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OT ? The Case For Being A Weekend Warrior


Song80s

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I am not a week end warrior. When I saw this article, I thought of many on KC that are.

 

You might not agree with some of the assertions. I think disagreement is cool since 2 opposing statements can be equally true:

 

https://medium.com/swlh/the-case-for-being-a-weekend-warrior-dee5bcec483

 

Working on your passion, side-hustle, hobby, etc has its limitations.

My passion is blogging and Im a weekend warrior.

 

A weekend warrior is someone who has a normal job and then works on their passion over the weekend.

 

In this article, Im going to change that meaning slightly and say that a weekend warrior is someone that has a normal job and works on their passion outside work hours. I thought about the advantages of being a weekend warrior.

 

Sometimes the restrictions you have are your greatest advantage.

For a lot us, we just want to get home from work to pursue our passion.

We tell ourselves the lie that if we could only find a way to do it full-time wed be set.

Trialing a passion full-time

 

I tried it with my blogging. I did it full-time. I thought it was the answer to all my dreams.

 

You know what happened?

 

I sat at home and didnt write. I watched movies, read books and told myself You got all the time in the world pal to blog, so take it easy.

I always had another thing to do before I could write.

 

Some days it was meditation, the gym and then helping my girlfriend with something because I love her very much. All that full-time blogging didnt look so great.

The output was less.

 

Acting out of desperation kills the art

The reason most of us work a 95 is obvious: money.

When you are forced to monetize your passion the desperation to make a living often kills all your creativity, drive and passion.

 

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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You end up taking shortcuts because you have to make money from your passion. I found that working 4 days a week at a normal job I liked and doing three days of blogging as a weekend warrior was the right balance for me.

 

The balance for you will be different. The equation is made up of making money, passion, art and time.

 

Passion needs room to breathe and suffocating it with desperation will not work. Ive tried many times.

 

A day job compounds your after-hours activity

 

The very fact I have to go to work is what helps my passion for blogging.

You might be thinking How the heck can an office job possibly help me work on my one and only passion?

 

I thought that way too. What I realized is that on the days I go to my 95, I come home with a sense of hunger.

 

I have all this energy built up inside of me that is just waiting to get out of me. Its this energy that has helped me write many viral blog posts.

 

At work, I experience lots of things which I then blog about when I get home. My day job taught me leadership and I could never write about that topic if it wasnt for my 95.

Life is very boring when all you have is never-ending space in front of you that you can piss up against the wall and take for granted.

 

If you do it full-time and youre burning out, whats the point

 

Speak to any musician who has played to thousands of people as their day job and theyll tell you that doing their art full-time burns them out.

 

Even when you do what you love full-time, you will get bored and theres a chance you will burn out. If all you do is burn out and end up hating your passion, whats the point?

 

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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Weekend warriors get to take breaks from their passion and embrace a forced distraction called a career.

 

This career becomes an acceptable excuse for being distracted which then helps reduce the chance of burnout.

 

You cant see your passion the same

When I started blogging, it changed me.

 

I can no longer read something without thinking about writing my own point of view. I find it hard to read because my busy mind starts thinking about what I can write myself.

Ask travel writers what its like to go on a holiday.

 

Theyll tell you that when they go on holiday, they are stuck in their critiquing mode and cant actually be present and aware of the holiday they are supposed to be having.

You end up spending so much time living your passion that you cant enjoy it or think with a clear head about how to create the work youre so passionate about.

 

Removing the blocks is the key

 

Weekend warriors have the obstacles they encounter temporarily removed because of their day job.

 

By being away from your passion, you can think about the obstacles you encounter with an objective mind. The solutions to the obstacles youll encounter in your passion often stem from stuff you see at work.

 

I found this to be the case when I was trying to write better and heard a story at work from a customer about how they approach the creative side of their business. They described their flower shop Instagram page to me and how its supposed to make the person viewing their page feel a certain way.

 

I realized that this was the same thing I was trying to do with my blogging.

 

This customer, by the way, was someone that was swearing at me and wanting a refund.

I thought this situation would be the last place in the world that I would find the solution to an obstacle I was encountering with my blogging.

 

Dont disregard how valuable unrelated work experiences are to pursuing your passion.

Its scratching an itch.

 

The weekend warrior like me has something that the full-time hobbyist doesnt have; were scratching an itch and choosing to follow our curiosity.

The outcome we weekend warriors are looking for is not defined, has no boundaries, can take as long as it needs to and is not a primary source of income.

Curiosity is our north star.

 

 

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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Summary

Your passion is supposed to be fun. Dont ruin it by trying to do it full-time unless youve tried it and found a way forward that works.

Im yet to find a way to do my passion of blogging full-time and theres something special about the way I currently do it that I dont want to mess with.

Its like when people ask Tim Ferriss why he wont revise his book The 4-Hour Workweek because he doesnt want to kill the magic it created for millions of people.

 

Messing with your passion when its working can be dangerous.

 

Theres nothing wrong with being a weekend warrior and there are plenty of advantages to it.

For some, being a weekend warrior is a way of life that makes their passion work in relation to the rest of their life.

Im proud to be a weekend warrior.

Try it.

 

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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So.....are you going to provide a link to your blog?

 

err, I think you are poking fun. I will pimp my originals in a heartbeat.

 

But I don't write articles. But I like to read creative stuff- and pass it along if it has some merit.

 

Should I be more clear in my opening 2 sentences ?

I am opposed to stupid spam , for sure.

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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I have been a "weekend warrior" (though as you point out, the war actually extends throughout the whole week!) for 35+ years and have always found for me it's the way to go. My day job gives me financial security and a lifestyle that I probably would not be able to have if I were dependent on music to make my living, and the freedom to pick and choose gigs and projects on the basis of how much I really want to do them and how much enjoyment and satisfaction they'll yield, there's never a sense of urgency or desperation about finding one. If I get stiffed on a gig, it's unpleasant but really not a major crisis, doesn't add that much stress to my life. I do hustle but not as hard as I'd have to. On the other hand it's likely that if I worked at this truly full-time I'd probably be a lot better, more polished and versatile as a musician, than I am, but then many full-time cats who are way more proficient, advanced and knowledgeable than I am, still struggle really hard and have to hustle constantly, take *any* money-making opportunity that comes up, in order to consistently have income. Maybe I'm soft, but for me, this way works better. I do look forward and aspire to one day being able to do music more like full-time, but that would be because I'd saved enough money to retire from my day-job career, so the earnings from playing still wouldn't be a necessity (and I'd probably still qualify as an amateur and hobbyist).

Rich Forman

Yamaha MOXF8, Korg Kronos 2-61, Roland Fantom X7, Ferrofish B4000+ organ module, Roland VR-09, EV ZLX12P, K&M Spider Pro stand,

Yamaha S80, Korg Trinity Plus

 

 

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It goes beyond when you spend your time and how much time you spend.

 

Even if you are very successful playing music, there are typically no guarantees of a lifelong reliable income. You can achieve a level where you can live off of the income, but when it dries up, you don't get early retirement or a pension plan.

 

I built a career in my industry (day job) based on my degree, experience, etc, and know that even if I need to change companies, I can always, until retirement, rely on a pay check and benefits. But it's also more than that. It's something that I have spent my life building that I enjoy.

 

I had a "Weekend Warrior" project that earned me enough income that I, with maybe some supplemental income, could have lived off of it at the time. Other band members WERE living off of it. It lasted about 7 years before, after my divorce and the hectic schedule balancing work and custody schedule with the kids, it started affecting my job. At that point you have to choose. Pick the stable job with guaranteed income and benefits, or pick the risky fun job that is great now, but no future guarantees. Well I made the right choice and have continued to advance my career and still have opportunities to scratch my musical itch.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I have been a "weekend warrior" (though as you point out, the war actually extends throughout the whole week!) for 35+ years and have always found for me it's the way to go. My day job gives me financial security and a lifestyle that I probably would not be able to have if I were dependent on music to make my living, and the freedom to pick and choose gigs and projects on the basis of how much I really want to do them and how much enjoyment and satisfaction they'll yield, there's never a sense of urgency or desperation about finding one. If I get stiffed on a gig, it's unpleasant but really not a major crisis, doesn't add that much stress to my life. I do hustle but not as hard as I'd have to. On the other hand it's likely that if I worked at this truly full-time I'd probably be a lot better, more polished and versatile as a musician, than I am, but then many full-time cats who are way more proficient, advanced and knowledgeable than I am, still struggle really hard and have to hustle constantly, take *any* money-making opportunity that comes up, in order to consistently have income. Maybe I'm soft, but for me, this way works better. I do look forward and aspire to one day being able to do music more like full-time, but that would be because I'd saved enough money to retire from my day-job career, so the earnings from playing still wouldn't be a necessity (and I'd probably still qualify as an amateur and hobbyist).

 

I agree 100% with you- except you are not soft at all, you are planning.

 

My bumpy road business career timeline and retirement:

- corporate wage slave, age 22-46

- independant business consultant, age 47-53

- business owner/sole proprietorship, age 54-62

-full retirement (few side hustles] age 63 thru today

 

Yes, I was biased on income security , family stuff for some decades and a goal of reaching retirement/total freedom ASAP.

 

I do not have the skill [ and the nerve] and energy to play in bands like you,

J Dan and many others.

My priority was to get serious about my music goals

at 63. Which is when I had the luxury of time and financial security to be free

to do as I please.

 

At some point, I realized, having more time is more important than having more money.

This is a personal balancing act- everyone is different. Call me idealistic,

I think we have to work our priorities and analyze carefully and plan.

 

I think its cool how our experience/thinking progresses beyond the article, o/p

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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My weekend warriorizing started last night this week, a rare Thurs night show. For me its a non-decision - I had started my family and had a 30 yr successful career in full swing before i returned to playing after a 30 yr sebatical from the decadent 80s. I love my career, actually, im doing important things for our world in the medical device field - making products that help people live better lives. My job is to make sure they are safe and effective, i take great pride in it. I am very comfortable, with upper middle class problems and perks - my family is spoiled way beyond anything I ever had growing up in a broken home. Nothing is more important to me than being able to give them the security and advantages I never had. Ill never trade that away for my personal affliction for music.

 

I get a rush playing live music - its why i restarted - to scratch the itch. Its not the money - i only want to be paid to confirm what im Doing is worthy of being on stage, really. Now 7 yrs in, i can say im a modestly able journeyman that nails my assignments and am a positive addition to every band i play with. Though lacking in top shelf chops, thats ok with me, i dont have the time to become top shelf and perhaps wouldnt get there even if i dedicated to it full time. Matters not - my life path decision above is set, i wont trade it.

 

Most of that article - meh ... his entire alrticle fails to persuade me as anything more than an individual anecdote that applies to just him vs a universal truth. His inability to do full time what he thought he wanted to do over-extends and biases the entirety of his article imo - its an interesting story for him but I dont think it goes far beyond him. I get no enhancement from my day job that carries into music, and i dont find my full time pro music friends to be any more or less satisfied or disastisfied than anyone else in any other job. Just to pick two parts of his hypothesis. blogging is too far removed from music is my first take - he thinks of part time blogging as a weekend warrior and i just ... dont. I think he blogs at home as a side hobby, like any other hobby. He could paint at home, doesnt make him a weekend warrior artist imo. Many of us here are musical weekend warriors - and my experience of it is it is much different than his. We fit our bits into and around our day life with constant study, prep, mid-week rehearsal (ok, i dont do bands that need to rehearse very much lol), etc. We rearrange work and family schedules at times to meet a band need or gig. We dont just go sit at our keyboard on Saturday and knock out a few tunes alone.

 

We are doing all the things small and large to pull our weight and be worthy of standing on stage next to our full time musical pals and delight audiences as if we are full time professional musicians. That we pull it off is proof were doing far more than sitting at a keyboard on Saturday writing up notes of what we saw during the week.

 

But .. interesting take from a completely different field. His perceptions dont match what i see in musicians.

The baiting I do is purely for entertainment value. Please feel free to ignore it.
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. Just to pick two parts of his hypothesis. blogging is too far removed from music is my first take - he thinks of part time blogging as a weekend warrior and i just ... dont. I think he blogs at home as a side hobby, like any other hobby. He could paint at home, doesnt make him a weekend warrior artist imo. Many of us here are musical weekend warriors - and my experience of it is it is much different than his. We fit our bits into and around our day life with constant study, prep, mid-week rehearsal (ok, i dont do bands that need to rehearse very much lol), etc. We rearrange work and family schedules at times to meet a band need or gig. We dont just go sit at our keyboard on Saturday and knock out a few tunes alone.

 

But .. interesting take from a completely different field. His perceptions dont match what i see in musicians.

 

I know, the author doesn't have decades of life experience. How could he ? My guess he is 30 yrs old. Its amusing almost. A young grasshopper writing a blog on creative passion/work life balance. In the comfort of his apartment office.

 

I already called him out on his musician comment, so he did not slide on that one

 

He had a few decent points. And the subject was worth kicking around.

 

KC and all of you true week end warriors are the real deal, IMO

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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I remember when back in music school my improv teacher talk about similar situation. My teacher said some of the best improvers he's heard are weekend warriors, he said since they don't have to pay their bills with music, they can explore and take changes that working musicians will hesitate doing in order to keep a gig.

 

So in some ways being a weekend warrior you have more freedom because you have a safety net of a day gig.

 

Now if you are going to do your thing full time create a work schedule and try to stick to it. I know from my time as a telecommuter that not having a schedule to keep the division between I'm working and persona time blurred together and it felt like all I did was work. Putting together a schedule helped with separating work from persona time.

 

Back in the day I was a recording 2nd engineer for a few years and I worked on a Elton John album. In talked with Gus Dudgeon Elton's great producer we got on the topic of Bernie Taupin who was sti Elton lyric writer. Gus told us Bernie treats lyric writing like a day job, he has and office in back of his house and he go "to work" at 8am and will work till about 4pm and call it a day. He said Elton just tells Bernie how many songs he needs lyrics for, brief description of topic of the song and music style and Bernie give him a timeframe for when they should be done and very business like. He said Bernie types all lyrics up (pre-computer days) and use that cheap brown paper like used in elementary school. Gus pulled out the lyric sheet for one of the tunes on the album we were working to show us. So having a schule can make turning on and off and controlling the creative juices much easier.

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I'm going back a few years now, but I've done both fully pro and weekend warrior and everything in between. Fully pro didn't allow me the opportunity to do much jazz work as with a young family, I couldn't afford to lose that job and we were working seven nights and one afternoon a week! However, it did allow me time to go out fishing with one of my bandmates that had a boat during the day, and if we drank a few beers on those trips, we were fully sober by the time of the evening engagement.

 

But weekend warrior+ was more relaxing and allowed to me to be part of a jazz club houseband and play with many topline guests, even if the money wasn't brilliant.

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I was at a crossroads during college - music or engineering? That was the early 80s and I had learned how bad the music industry was getting after I read the book Platinum Rainbow.

 

I finished my engineering degree, and my day job pays for my music hobby. I never wanted to be anything more than a weekend warrior playing local gigs. As time went on it got a lot harder for pro musicians to earn a living.

 

Maybe I could never have a professional career in music, but at least I could contribute by sharing my knowledge on restoring and maintaining vintage gear.

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I was at a crossroads during college - music or engineering? That was the early 80s and I had learned how bad the music industry was getting after I read the book Platinum Rainbow.

 

I finished my engineering degree, and my day job pays for my music hobby. I never wanted to be anything more than a weekend warrior playing local gigs. As time went on it got a lot harder for pro musicians to earn a living.

 

Maybe I could never have a professional career in music, but at least I could contribute by sharing my knowledge on restoring and maintaining vintage gear.

 

I agree, I think there are several us who gave the ' business' a pass at an early age.

I bagged it at 22. Similar to you, I had my business career to develop which was a priority.

Then marriage, family stuff.

 

These days I have total freedom to pursue my music passion.

 

It all works out. Lots of places to apply our interests and have fun doing so.

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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I'm grateful that I get to be a weekend warrior at my age. I have a main band that's really good. We gig once or twice a month, sometimes more, sometimes less. I've had several 2nd bands and recently left one that had a once-a-month steady gig. I play in a weekly jam with some top pro players. There are several other jams that I could play in if I had the time and inclination. I'm not a great player but I'm good enough so that other players know what I can do and that I can fit in and contribute to the overall sound, be easy to get along with, and not an egotistical jerk. I'm fortunate that I don't need to make a living - I'm semi-retired but still maintain a consulting business. I'm also grateful that I can afford the gear I need to do my weekend warrior thang. It's "the best of all possible worlds" - Candide
These are only my opinions, not supported by any actual knowledge, experience, or expertise.
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