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I just quit my job....


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I've been working for my current employer for the last 4 years. Pretty much since I started our company started to go down the toilet (through no fault of mine honest...)

 

For the last four years I've survived quarterly lay offs and just when we started to make a profit again and we were promised raises for the first time in 3 years, the powers that be decided to outsource what I do to another company.

 

So in the next 6 months I could be working for this new company or they could ship all the work out East and I'd be unemployeed.

 

Anyway, I've never had anything much of a pay raise in that time and currently I'm on the bottom rung of the ladder.

 

My contract though states that I have to give 3 months notice.

 

I've just been offered a job elsewhere and I've accepted it and given 1 months notice.

 

Some other guys quit about 2 months ago and gave 1 months notice and that was fine *but* when it's my turn to quit suddenly this 3 month notice thing is brought up and waved around.

 

Apparently the difference is that for the other guys quitting there were people to replace them....

For me there mightn't be - so they have to hire someone and try to get me to work the 3 months.

 

No idea where I stand legally but someone said that it was unlikely that they'd go to court for 50k expenses for someone earning less than 3k in 2 months.

 

Anyway - should be a happy day for me, but it's been blighted a bit...

 

Maybe I just care too much? :)

Chris Griffin: Yo, did y'all check me when that hottie was all up in my Kool-Aid? Yeah, I was looking to break off a little somethin' somethin' but my crew gave me the 411 on that skank and she's all about the bling-bling.
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Sorry to hear that you have a hard time.

 

I have a pretty strong feeling that the three months is when the employer is ending your employment but when you want to resign you only have to give a 1 month notice.

 

Check with the unemployment office or the labour union, they should know the rules.

 

Good luck!

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You may be able to strike some kind of deal.

 

My brother once left company before completing 6 months of employment. He would have had to reimburse them for the relocation costs (from Texas to Cali), which was about 4K.

 

He worked out with them a deal of working on a project on the side. He was real busy for a month or so at night on weekends, but it worked out.

 

Best of Luck.

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Wow, sounds a bit like where I work...

 

I don't think they can really enforce that 3 month thing. Sure, they could try to take you to court for it, but if they're on the verge of being broke then they can't really afford it either.

 

My employer has the same requirement, but elsewhere in the agreement they say that they can let me go with no notice. That's hardly fair - and to me, the agreement should basically be equal, and they know that I reserve the right to stop coming in to work should the situation warrant it.

 

If a break is amicable, then I would make a smooth transition with reasonable notice. But realistically, who would hire you if you could not come to work for 3 months? I think that 1 month should be quite adequate - the norm for most jobs is supposed to be 2 weeks, isn't it?

 

If they pushed it, I'd give them the choice: I can come in & work for the next month & we can make a transition, or I can stop coming in tomorrow & you can deal with everything I do for you. :D

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Screw them and their three months. if they bring it up again, please ask them directly how long they will guarantee your continued employement (under these circumstances). Then ask if they have a specific severance package put together for you. If they "umm" and "err" at that, tell them that you'll forego your severance if they'll forego the three month clause.

 

Of course, from my experience, unless you have a very specific gig literally waiting for you that won't be around later, it's generally better to wait until you do get laid off, and take the severance, and start your new gig with a nice amount of cash in pocket.

 

- Jeff

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Originally posted by alcohol_:

From what I understand, you can't be forced to work for someone if your an employee. If you're not an employee and an outside contractor that might be a different story.

Different states have slightly varying laws in this regard. in California where I live, it's an "at will employment" state. That means one can quit whenever one wants, and be fired with no notice or particular reason given. However, if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. signing bonuses, relocation costs, etc.), the company can try and recoup that money. On the other side, if the firing can be proved to be based on illegal reasons (discrimination based on race or age or gender, etc.), then the employee can sue the former employer, obviously.

 

The other thing that happens, usually in higher-level positions, is the signing of a non-compete clause in a work contract. Often that says that someone can't work for a competeing company for a period of a year after ending employment with the original employer. However, these are often thrown out if they come to courts, especially in situations where the former employee's ability to earn money is severely impinged as a result. That's the reason that many large severances are given. No one can sue based on this reason if the employer gives them a year salary to go away, for example.

 

- Jeff

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FnB's info says From:UK... So I'm assuming he lives in the UK?

 

If so, US labor laws won't be very "applicable". :eek:

 

I would review your contract carefully to understand what you signed. You may also seek advice from your own labor law attorney. Sometimes there are labor associations that provide labor law advice.

 

The fact that they let "others" leave with a 30 day notice, if they in fact signed the same 90 day notice as you is probably in your favor... In US law this would be seen as discriminatory.

 

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Originally posted by guitplayer:

FnB's info says From:UK... So I'm assuming he lives in the UK?

 

If so, US labor laws won't be very "applicable". :eek:

They call me Mister Observant. :rolleyes:

 

Sorry. Unless he was writing from the University of Kentucky, my observations are indeed pointless. And the UK does indeed have different laws in this regard that would make the 3-month notice more enforceable.

 

- Jeff

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