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Dexibell Vivo S1 Stage Piano


Raymb1
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My understanding is it has the same engine and feature as the S3 and S7, but with 68 semi-weighted keys, optional battery operation, optional fancy sustain pedal emulation, and possibly some other differences.

 

It'd be nice to know how the action is, but I haven't seen any reports.

 

I tried out the S3 for a couple weeks before returning it. I liked it well enough. It has some great APs with a very good finger to sound connection, and the other sounds are definitely useable. If the synth capabilities had been better -- say even as rudimentarily adequate as a Roland VR09 -- the S3 might have been a keeper for me. The S3 is a good lightweight hammer action board for APs and other traditional sounds, but it's pricey for what it is.

 

The form factor makes the S1 very intriguing if the base soundset (and ability to add your own samples) would work for you. The S3 is 22.7 lbs with TP100 hammer action and the S1 is something like 18 lbs with semi-weighted. Losing 4 lbs but also losing hammer action (even if it's not a great one) is, to me, not an obvious gain.

 

Dexibell's promos for the S1 shows people riding bicycles through the countryside and playing their keyboard wherever inspiration strikes. It's a nice idea but you can have that without paying $1500.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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The optimal number of keys depends on your style, what you're trying to accomplish, and how adaptable you can be. For a keyboard I intend to move around a lot, I would pay more not to have keys I don't need.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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here is a not so informative review on the s1 . . .

 

https://www.keyboardmag.com/gear/review-dexibell-vivo-s1-stage-piano

 

i asked the uk rep about s1 action and he responded . . .

 

its pretty light - but enough to convey the depth of the piano sound and light enough for my synthy lead bits, so a good compromise

 

jeff

 

.... Jeff /// Yamaha P515 /// Roll Tide
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here is a not so informative review on the s1 . . .

 

https://www.keyboardmag.com/gear/review-dexibell-vivo-s1-stage-piano

 

The reviewer says it has hammer action, which it doesn't. I wonder if he even played it, the review reads like it was written by Dexibell's marketing dept.

s

I forgot to mention one curious omission from the S series: no wah effect! The clavs sound quite good with a nice key-off sample, but no wah-wah effect. Inexcusable omission, imo.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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I forgot to mention one curious omission from the S series: no wah effect! The clavs sound quite good with a nice key-off sample, but no wah-wah effect. Inexcusable omission, imo.

I guess you could just do it the way you did it on a real clav, and put it through a wah-wah pedal.

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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If you go to the piano forum you'll see some fairly positive reviews of the Vivo S's. I think this supports the conclusion that it can be a good choice for folks for whom acoustic piano is the primary focus.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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Actually, Cale Hawkins test drove the unit for a week at his studio in Brooklyn.

 

I organized a loaner for him from Dexibell.

 

Cale works with people like Quincy Jones. Hes a terrific player and programmer, and a touring pro.

 

He liked the unit a lot. To assume he is from Dexibells marketing department just because he had positive things to say would be a mistake.

 

Cheers.

 

Jon Regen

Editor

KEYBOARD

 

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If you go to the piano forum you'll see some fairly positive reviews of the Vivo S's. I think this supports the conclusion that it can be a good choice for folks for whom acoustic piano is the primary focus.

 

I agree it probably sounds fantastic. I'll know for sure in a few days when my P7 arrives. It seems a waste to have that extensive of a sound engine with such long samples in a board with only 68 notes.

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Actually, Cale Hawkins test drove the unit for a week at his studio in Brooklyn.

 

I organized a loaner for him from Dexibell.

 

Cale works with people like Quincy Jones. Hes a terrific player and programmer, and a touring pro.

 

He liked the unit a lot. To assume he is from Dexibells marketing department just because he had positive things to say would be a mistake.

 

Cheers.

 

Jon Regen

Editor

KEYBOARD

 

Saying someone writes as if they were in Dexibell marketing is different than alleging they are actually employed by Dexibell. The latter sounds like a conflict of interest, but the former is just a comment about a review being perhaps over the top in its praise. Saying a keyboard has hammer action when it doesn't is naturally going to make people wonder if the reviewer actually played it.

 

I like what Dexibell is doing, and as I said above the S1 is intriguing in a lot of ways. If it were hammer action it would be a pretty good choice for me.

 

 

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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FYI from Dexibell.

 

+++

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 25, 2018

 

 

DEXIBELL releases the portable VIVO S1 digital piano in North America

 

 

Los Angeles, CA (April 25, 2018). Today DEXIBELL announces the release of the VIVO S1 digital piano in North America.

 

The VIVO S1 is a professional quality 68-key digital piano with light-weighted hammer-action keyboard in a pure aluminum body. For musicians on-the-go, it has the capability to operate on plug-in power or standard AA batteries and is bluetooth-enabled, making this an extremely portable and versatile instrument. Weighing less than 19 lbs, it is the lightest professional quality digital stage piano on the market. The VIVO S1 keyboard packs the latest technology and features without sacrificing quality.

 

Keeping the serious musician in mind, the VIVO S1 includes DEXIBELLs patented T2L (True to Life) technologies including:

 

High definition tone (24-bit and 48KHz): cutting-edge, pure living sound featuring over 15 seconds of state of the art sampling produce an acoustic realism unlike anything heard before in a digital piano.

 

 

Modeling: every tones characteristics and behavior is recreated to perfection and fully customizable to the performers musical taste and touch.

 

 

Unlimited polyphony: with sympathetic resonance and full acoustic overtones, DEXIBELLs high-powered quad-core computer and 320 oscillators produce truly unlimited polyphony.

 

 

Seamless patch change: sounds and effects are designed for seamless transition during patch changes or memory recalls to avoid interruption.

 

 

Additionally, the VIVO S1 introduces:

 

Virtual Damper Pedal: allows the musician to perform by fully sustaining notes and passages without the use of a physical pedal.

 

 

AQUAVIVA OS: DEXIBELLs revolutionary operating system that allows audio and midi functionality to be transmitted through a single USB cable, eliminating the need for digital audio interfaces and giving the musician ultimate control over their music and gear.

 

 

Todays musician demands the highest quality gear, state of the art technology, maximum versatility, and complete portability, said Antonio Ferranti, President of DEXIBELL North America. The VIVO S1 delivers with new standard-setting tone, touch, and technology, all packed into the industrys lightest and most attractive keyboard instrument. From the studio to the stage, the VIVO S1 has it all.

 

 

View the official product video here:

 

 

For more information or to find a retailer near you, visit http://www.dexibell.com/

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This looks to me that it would be the ideal lower board for the Mojo61.

 

Almost the same width, a thousand miles better piano, depth could be easily modded to accept the Mojo sitting right on top with very little space in between.

 

Edit: 43" wide; Mojo61 is 36.5"

 

 

____________________________________
Rod

victoria bc

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The action is semi-weighted. Is it ok now to use the phrase "hammer action" in reference to semi-weighted keybeds? Does anyone know which action is used? Other Dexibell keyboards use fatar, so is there a Fatar semi-weighted hammer action keybed?

 

I'm happy to be wrong about this, if being wrong means I didn't understand the right terminology, but now I'd like to know whether there's right and wrong way to use the phrase "hammer action," or is it whatever anyone says it is/

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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This looks to me that it would be the ideal lower board for the Mojo61.

 

Almost the same width, a thousand miles better piano, depth could be easily modded to accept the Mojo sitting right on top with very little space in between.

 

Edit: 43" wide; Mojo61 is 36.5"

 

 

that's part of what I like about the form factor of the S1, it allows you to get a top keyboard very close without blocking controls. The RD64 is the same way. Compared to the S1 gives you more and far better sounds and 4 more keys up top. The RD is fully weighted.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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Even more interesting for some of us, you may be able to set the S1 on top of the Mojo and not need a second tier. Just eyeballing it, it looks like it could work, but can't be sure until it's tried.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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the battery option seems silly and inconvenient when you need 8 rechargeable AA type Ni-MH batteries that have to be removed and charged in an additional external charging unit.

can imagine how long that charge lasts . . .

 

jeff

.... Jeff /// Yamaha P515 /// Roll Tide
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  • 2 weeks later...
[Paging action experts: other boards with that action? The Studiologic Numa Compact/2/2x is TP/9PIANO, I believe.

Correct about the Numa. The 8 is used by Kurzweil in Artis7 and the 76 key versions of the PC3. Assuming Kurz and Dexibell are using the same stock version of it, it is more heavily sprung than the Numa Compact 2. With alternate springs, though, I like it.

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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I finally had a shot at the FA-07 recently in my local shop. I was disappointed with the action. Key size is better than the 06, but it is tight and springy and still doesnt trigger well when you go deep toward the back of the keys. It feels nothing like the VR-700, Jupiter-80, or even XP-80.

 

Trying to even fathom enjoying playing piano on a TP8/9 action. What is different about it if Fatar labels it Piano? I guess its not waterfall but rather diving board type key ends.

Yamaha CP88, Roland VR-700, Crumar Mojo, rebuilt 1910 Chickering 5'2", Fender Rhodes MKI 88k, Casio PX-560

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I finally had a shot at the FA-07 recently in my local shop. I was disappointed with the action. Key size is better than the 06, but it is tight and springy and still doesnt trigger well when you go deep toward the back of the keys. It feels nothing like the VR-700, Jupiter-80

Yup, yup, and yup. Not as good as the Jupiter 50, either. I never compared the sizes, but I agree, it is only a minor step up from the 06, which is not a high bar. That rear key resistance still cripples it for dynamics, especially piano expressivity. So to me, while it may be better than the 06, it wasn't better in the way that mattered most.

 

Trying to even fathom enjoying playing piano on a TP8/9 action. What is different about it if Fatar labels it Piano? I guess its not waterfall but rather diving board type key ends.

There is no waterfall TP9. The TP8/9 piano variants are neither diving board nor waterfall, they are piano-lipped. The TP9/P of the Numa Compact does not look or feel like the TP9 of the PC361, it plays much better for piano than that did. I'm not sure, but I think the throw may be longer, among other things.

 

 

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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Hey, Scott. So this is a TP/9P in the S1?

And it has a semi weight feel and is possibly a better compromise for weight action like the Numa Compact? Maybe the Numa Compact 2x is a better pick than the S1 given the variety of timbres and sound engines in the Numa.

 

I have a few NYC restaurant gigs coming up without convenient parking. Im debating just bringing my VR-09. Or borrowing a PX-560. On the other hand I wonder for needing to walk with it over my shoulder a few blocks - if the Compact 2x or something like the S1 would be tolerable.

 

Got to play Montage 6 recently as well. Sounds excellent with superior build quality and action. 33lbs 1oz (the 7 is 37lbs 8oz) Just so damn expensive. An Artis 7 or SP6 might be better $/Weight/Play compromise.

 

 

Yamaha CP88, Roland VR-700, Crumar Mojo, rebuilt 1910 Chickering 5'2", Fender Rhodes MKI 88k, Casio PX-560

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Hey, Scott. So this is a TP/9P in the S1?

TP/8P based on the info earlier in this thread.

 

As for NumaCompact vs S1 action... If the S1 is heavily sprung, I'd prefer the Numa. With the lighter springs, it might sway the other way.

 

I have a few NYC restaurant gigs coming up without convenient parking. Im debating just bringing my VR-09. Or borrowing a PX-560. On the other hand I wonder for needing to walk with it over my shoulder a few blocks - if the Compact 2x or something like the S1 would be tolerable.

Good time for a carry bag with wheels. Or a luggage cart.

 

Another lightweight board available with more than 61 keys and a possibly decent action for piano would be the Vox Continental. A bit heavier would be the Roland VR-730,and Nord Electro/Stage. Of course some of these options get pricey, though.

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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