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Herbie Hancock at Robert Glasper's birthday party


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I'll type it again, I'm glad Herbie Hancock is still in the land of the living and we should cherish him.

 

I think it is awesome that Herbie is accessible to other musicians regardless of what they do musically. He always seem to have a blast when he's playing. :thu::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I'll type it again, I'm glad Herbie Hancock is still in the land of the living and we should cherish him.

 

I think it is awesome that Herbie is accessible to other musicians regardless of what they do musically. He always seem to have a blast when he's playing. :thu::cool:

 

I've heard the same said about Bill Murray.

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By the way, is that a Crumar Seven I see?

 

To bring it back to the Seven thread, why isn't Herbie playing Chick's Mark V on the Motif when he decides to get all tinkly in the pants?

 

Food for thought. But it's quite obvious that Herbie subscribes to the Modeling > Sampling doctrine put forth by Guido and the boys.

 

 

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It is so strange I have never heard what I heard Herbie do at the Blue Note again. Not a single person can confirm it. He played the most musically challenging yet still musically exciting music, I HAVE EVER HEARD.

I heard him 5 nights in a row. And he did NOT play on that level every night or every song,

but when he did ( a minority of times ) it was absolutely genius level music.

I have described before.. and will again.

Charles Ives has a composition where while one theme is playing, he introduces another completely unrelated theme at the same time. For analogy sake.. like 19th century romantic theme, and suddenly a marching band as a counterpoint to the romantic theme.

Got that in you head?

 

Now imagine Herbie doing that same idea of two seemingly unrelated themes happening t the same time.. That means melody, rhythmically AND harmony.

Do you have any idea just how conceptually difficult that feat is?

I can hardly type this in terms of description.

 

I have never heard a recording of this by Herbie . So I cannot provide an example.

But when witnessing it. my inner voice and joy, informed me I was in the presence of true genius. That word is over used, and if you were ever exposed to it... what can I say.

 

Can anyone in the jazz sub category here.. provide a recording of a modern jazz pianist that has these qualities?

 

I have never heard the icons of jazz, do this.. Mc Coy, Chick, Keith, etc.

It took 5 nights of listening to yield this magical pearl... Since I have never listened to a top jazz pianist for 5 days in a row... maybe one of you have?

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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It is so strange I have never heard what I heard Herbie do at the Blue Note again. Not a single person can confirm it. He played the most musically challenging yet still musically exciting music, I HAVE EVER HEARD.

 

I heard him 5 nights in a row. And he did NOT play on that level every night or every song, but when he did ( a minority of times ) it was absolutely genius level music.

 

Now imagine Herbie doing that same idea of two seemingly unrelated themes happening t the same time.. That means melody, rhythmically AND harmony.

 

I have never heard a recording of this by Herbie . So I cannot provide an example.

 

But when witnessing it. my inner voice and joy, informed me I was in the presence of true genius. That word is over used, and if you were ever exposed to it... what can I say.

 

Can anyone in the jazz sub category here.. provide a recording of a modern jazz pianist that has these qualities?

 

I have never heard the icons of jazz, do this...

First and foremost, Herbie is a certified genius and living legend as a pianist especially Jazz.

 

IMO, one beauty of genius is being able to deliver a mesmerizing performance that "you had to be there" to witness. As a result, the listeners will be hanging on to every performance waiting to hear that magic again.

 

Also IMO, one of the downsides to recorded music is that it often times creates an expectation among the listeners. The recording becomes the definitive version of the music sometimes leaving the performer little or no room to improvise.

 

I believe recordings should he limited to a) showcasing new ideas/music and b) letting listeners know the artist is still in the game.

 

But, the real magic should be reserved for live performances. If it just so happens to get recorded, so be it. Otherwise, give the listeners just enough to keep wanting more.

 

In that regard, I think Herbie did it right. At some point elsewhere, I'm sure he has revisited those concepts he delivered at the Blue Note. But again, you had to be there. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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For me the story of this clip is the conversations Herbie has with the drummer (Ronald Bruner Jr., aka Thundercat's brother) throughout. That disco-nightmare-stravaganza they settle into after the 5:00 is straight-up demonic.

 

Everything I've loved about Herbie Hancock involves his deeply internal relationship with time and groove, and to me this "reads" almost as a long, melodic drum solo spread out over two or three or four instruments.

 

Thanks for posting.

"
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It is so strange I have never heard what I heard Herbie do at the Blue Note again. Not a single person can confirm it. He played the most musically challenging yet still musically exciting music, I HAVE EVER HEARD.

 

I heard him 5 nights in a row. And he did NOT play on that level every night or every song, but when he did ( a minority of times ) it was absolutely genius level music.

 

Now imagine Herbie doing that same idea of two seemingly unrelated themes happening t the same time.. That means melody, rhythmically AND harmony.

 

I have never heard a recording of this by Herbie . So I cannot provide an example.

 

But when witnessing it. my inner voice and joy, informed me I was in the presence of true genius. That word is over used, and if you were ever exposed to it... what can I say.

 

Can anyone in the jazz sub category here.. provide a recording of a modern jazz pianist that has these qualities?

 

I have never heard the icons of jazz, do this...

First and foremost, Herbie is a certified genius and living legend as a pianist especially Jazz.

 

IMO, one beauty of genius is being able to deliver a mesmerizing performance that "you had to be there" to witness. As a result, the listeners will be hanging on to every performance waiting to hear that magic again.

 

Also IMO, one of the downsides to recorded music is that it often times creates an expectation among the listeners. The recording becomes the definitive version of the music sometimes leaving the performer little or no room to improvise.

 

I believe recordings should he limited to a) showcasing new ideas/music and b) letting listeners know the artist is still in the game.

 

But, the real magic should be reserved for live performances. If it just so happens to get recorded, so be it. Otherwise, give the listeners just enough to keep wanting more.

 

In that regard, I think Herbie did it right. At some point elsewhere, I'm sure he has revisited those concepts he delivered at the Blue Note. But again, you had to be there. :cool:

 

All true// But I have never heard anyone attempt to play two themes at the same time.

I am not talking about the too common, playing a quote of a song, while playing a solo on another song.

Aside from the incredible beauty of what Herbie did maybe once among the five nights.. the extreme difficulty involved.. just blows my mind.

To hold two different ideas in mind at the same time, not just melodically,, is awe inspiring.

I have never heard this again. And with all of the youtube Herbie things that are out there.. I am going to start listening , to see if he ever touches that nearly unplayable level again.

BTW Herbie, in his humble candor, said over the PA, that he got lost while playing in this extraordinary manner. And no wonder. I think generations to come, when musicians lift to whole new levels, will perhaps reach into these spheres.

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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Tristano and Melhdau are into that fugue stuff. I once listened to an unknown student of Tristano play build up to playing 10 themes at once. It Was impressive, technically, but nothing I would enjoy listening to

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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I play and teach that style. You could call it choir style: Bass Tenor Alto and Soprano (melody) maintained at all times with consistent voice leading...All my students are required to play all the standard jazz ballads using that system before we solo, add syncopated stride, and arpeggios in the left hand. Becomes quite effortless after a few months, adding a fifth and sixth layer is not hard once you can play 4 part jazz ballads. At That point I like to call it bill over bud.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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I play and teach that style. You could call it choir style: Bass Tenor Alto and Soprano (melody) maintained at all times with consistent voice leading...All my students are required to play all the standard jazz ballads using that system before we solo, add syncopated stride, and arpeggios in the left hand. Becomes quite effortless after a few months, adding a fifth and sixth layer is not hard once you can play 4 part jazz ballads. At That point I like to call it bill over bud.

 

Is this what IMRT was describing? I thought he was referring to independent linear, melodic lines. Sounds like you're just describing corresponding harmonies. I'm probably misinterpreting one (or both) of you.

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Tristano and Melhdau are into that fugue stuff. I once listened to an unknown student of Tristano play build up to playing 10 themes at once. It Was impressive, technically, but nothing I would enjoy listening to

 

Me, Tee, A chump, making his case for a man he idolizes.

 

Technically? No, conceptually. But I cannot be sure whether these two respected jazz pianists did what Herbie did on one isolated piece... one time, across five nights of hearing him...

but my sense is no way.

 

The reason I call Herbie a true genius is precisely because he is capable ( not so much technically - but conceptually ) of hearing that degree of complexity WHILE at the same time making it incredibly musical.

 

That is where anyone less than a true genius, does not quite cut it.

I tend to find Tristano a bit overly intellectual. ( Herbie, in his humble wisdom, would likely chastise me for saying this about Tristano or Brad)

And I recall Herbie self reflecting, saying he was going through a period where he indeed, DID feel his music was intellectual. Shortly after which we heard his movement away from it and we heard Headhunters etc.

 

The other thing is... It was NOT just two melodic ideas, ( aka a watered down fugue ) but it felt or seemed to me ( in my astonished state of joy ) that Herbie was doing something impossibility difficult - two different streams of musical ideas, or compositions , seemingly unrelated , that he MADE related: simply put- beautiful.

 

That defines genius for me. As it was happening before my eyes, I said to myself, this is a genius. Mind you, I heard him five days in a row... so I was already bathed in his overflowing ability, but this one song, was even beyond that.

This is frustrating because I have never heard this again.. no one knows to what I refer. Yet it was beyond belief when I heard it.

 

Back to birthday party sit in: If you listen to how Herbie first plays some phrases on the Motif EF ... right away you hear his mind is already way beyond whatever the song suggested to a normal pianist! I think it was Butterfly , right?

Herbie blew their minds precisely because Herbies head was so far from Butterfly as a normal talented pianist might open up his solo with. They were elated not only by his stature / status, but by his genius.

 

Herbie's opening playing: But that is Herbie in first gear ( playing an unfamiliar instrument ) , but as a genius he has more gears.. more levels of incomprehensible genius.

 

I idolized Coltrane from teens, over everyone else in jazz. I took 4 lessons with Tranes main teacher. That teacher turned me off because he tried to turn me into a Jehovah witness. But that teacher as great as he may have been, had a strong intellectual vibe about him. And that is the good news and in the hands of anyone less than Trane or Herbie, intellectuality is the enemy of beauty in music IMO. And beauty and groove, are the two elements that I value over all others. Esp if beauty also includes the divine..

Mind you Herbie is a devout Buddhist and Trane had a devout quality about him.

As did my ultimate hero Bach.

 

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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I play and teach that style. You could call it choir style: Bass Tenor Alto and Soprano (melody) maintained at all times with consistent voice leading...All my students are required to play all the standard jazz ballads using that system before we solo, add syncopated stride, and arpeggios in the left hand. Becomes quite effortless after a few months, adding a fifth and sixth layer is not hard once you can play 4 part jazz ballads. At That point I like to call it bill over bud.

 

Is this what IMRT was describing? I thought he was referring to independent linear, melodic lines. Sounds like you're just describing corresponding harmonies. I'm probably misinterpreting one (or both) of you.

 

You are on the right track but just much much more than you might think. Herbie is beyond we mortals. Sorry Maestro Hancock, that is my opinion and I do not think Herbie would appreciate my saying that. Talk about paradox. But Herbie operates on a higher level, partly thanks to his Buddhist practice, ditto for Wayne. In that metaphysical space, there is no I ness. As Dizzy said, the Music invites you in. It is the Music Itself that takes over the musician. My analysis of that performance, and of Herbie as a genius, unfortunately is marred by my ego.

The less ego, including intellectuality, the more the music can shine through the musician. But at earlier stages of development, we use the intellect to learn how to eventually play without intellect. paradox anyone?

 

Reviewing my memory of the video... when Herbie first appears.. Robert G, hugs him

then Herbie is seated, and immediately plays on shall I call it, the more sophisticated side, of Butterfly.. ( I do not recall if the bass player had already segued away from Butterfly or not, just prior to Herbie ) or perhaps a chord that announced "we are not playing pretty Butterfly any longer " . That opening chord structure opened up where Herbie lives... in incredible openness to new music.

The second Herbie played his first chord, you will see Robert checking out the voicing. Butterfly is a delicious use of minor seventh ( basically ) sonorities, as crafted by a genius. So Herbie immediately played I believe a Dominant tritons structure, that normally would not be associated with the minorish Butterfly.

 

[video:youtube]

 

I have not spent much time listening to Herbie, my ultimate favorite modern pianist, musician.

Listening now.. I am reminded how his playing invites that kind of multi dimensional playing, that makes it possible to play two thematic ideas at the same time, if not likely, given how difficult it is. (To me, that requires superhuman focus)

It leads the way for 21st century musicians for a long time to come.

Herbie is number one ( for me ) , because he is has the most "beautiful lines" while he is delving into the most unlikely places.

 

The big issue with playing outside, is how can outside playing be outside yet have degrees of beauty reminiscent of 18- 19th century music.

For me, Herbie is the pinnacle of that music challenge/ question ....I realize the bass is sticking around one tonality... so in that sense it is not atonal... but anyway those are some thoughts about someone most of us admire.

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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