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Synthesizer Presets--No Patch Names


ProfD
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Inspired by the clonewheel thread :laugh:

 

My Prophet 6 (P6) has 500 user and 500 permanent presets. But, look ma, this bad boy doesnt have fancy patch names. They are numeric. Thats right, it is 1978 again. :D

 

So, in the first 48 hours, er, the 1st 44 sounds of bank 0 I have programmed to complement the SV-1 presets when Im in a layering mood/mode.

 

Its great. I call up a sound on the SV-1 and it changes the P6 accordingly. Bada bing, bada boom.

 

Well, that still leaves me with a whopping 456 preset sound locations.

 

Surely, I could try to remember the sound in each location but there has to be a better way. Guess I could create a cheat sheet too.

 

In looking at my 1st world situation, Im curious to read about the systems my KC brethren use to memorize their numeric sound banks.

 

Full disclosureI really do not have to rely on presets. The P6 is so much fun and easy to program that I can get the sound I want in a matter of seconds.

 

But, thats not what this particular hokey pokey is all about. I might as well play Cee-lo and put something in the 456 locations. :laugh::cool:

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Even with names, I try to group related sounds (brass, lead, pad, string) in particular number ranges.

 

I'll even make copies of go-to sounds in the first 10 slots so I can quickly pull up something that works in many cases.

 

When I have neural overload, I can at least remember "20s are leads, 40s are pads, 60s are brass, etc."

 

 

I make software noises.
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Even with names, I try to group related sounds (brass, lead, pad, string) in particular number ranges.

 

I'll even make copies of go-to sounds in the first 10 slots so I can quickly pull up something that works in many cases.

 

When I have neural overload, I can at least remember "20s are leads, 40s are pads, 60s are brass, etc."

 

 

Grouping is my modus operandi too.

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I'll even make copies of go-to sounds in the first 10 slots so I can quickly pull up something that works in many cases.

 

When I have neural overload, I can at least remember "20s are leads, 40s are pads, 60s are brass, etc."

 

Grouping is my modus operandi too.

Yep. I'm working along the same lines. Trying to decide whether I'm going to work in groups of 10s or challenge myself with single digit groupings i.e. basses on 14, 24, 34, 44, 54...:laugh::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Yes I tend to have flexible patches that I can use in a pinch. That was one reason I loved my virus so much--I had maybe 20 different patches I used, but I could tweak them so quickly it was no limitation at all. Actually was rather fun :) I doubt I sounded the same at any two gigs...
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I've always tried to use one board to switch everything for a song even dating back to the days of my Alesis data disk/A70/sound canvas/Jupiter 6 days. So even when not layering, one keyboard would send patch changes to everything. Of course that requires they all be set to different midi channels if you DONT want it layered. May not be ideal for your situation. Maybe something like setlist maker - you could still give them patch names, just not stored in the P6.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I'll even make copies of go-to sounds in the first 10 slots so I can quickly pull up something that works in many cases.

 

When I have neural overload, I can at least remember "20s are leads, 40s are pads, 60s are brass, etc."

 

Grouping is my modus operandi too.

Yep. I'm working along the same lines. Trying to decide whether I'm going to work in groups of 10s or challenge myself with single digit groupings i.e. basses on 14, 24, 34, 44, 54...:laugh::cool:

 

That's actually the convention I use for Memorymoog, OBX, and others. x0 for FX, x1 for strings, x2 for horns, x3 for pads, etc. I can remember it across multiple boards. It also works for the OB-centric patches such as A1, B1, C1, D1, AB1, BC1, CD1, ABC1, etc...

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