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synth lovers - bad ass playing


Delaware Dave

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I'll see your Kool and raise you a Cory:

 

[video:youtube]

 

Jaw dropping action begins at 4:20, but you know you want to listen to the whole thing...

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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Jaw dropping action begins at 4:20, but you know you want to listen to the whole thing...

 

Fuck it...I'm going back to playing bass and guitar. I ain't never gonna play keys like that.

 

(Loved it.)

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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No bad ass playing thread would be complete without Belinda...

 

When she threw her leg over the keytar, I wasn't sure whether she was going to make love to it or start playing it with her toes...

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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Scored one of these a few years ago from a pawnshop that thought it was a mini-arranger keyboard with non-working internal speakers.

One must remember that it is a mono-synth and internally only plays "leads" but it is also makes for a very nice controller.

(PS: Prophecy can very quickly piss off bass players via it's monstrous bass patches and articulations.)

 

 

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I've always used fingers instead of thumb as well.

 

Z1 was basically a polyphonic Prophecy. Monstrous synth at the time, but with setbacks.

 

 

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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I've always used fingers instead of thumb as well.

 

Z1 was basically a polyphonic Prophecy. Monstrous synth at the time, but with setbacks.

 

 

Well, that's not completely accurate. It was based on the Prophecy, but those models were improved, and more were added (7 became 13).

 

Jerry

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Say what you will about this, but I surely can appreciate:

 

-The ability to play a solo over a modal vamp and actually build and build to a climax

 

-The fuckin showmanship. As silly as it is, the audience loves it.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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-The fuckin showmanship. As silly as it is, the audience loves it.

 

I've always been very aware of the precise wording of the phrase, "I'm going to see a band."

 

Operative word: See.

 

The audience can listen to you anytime, anywhere, but if they pay their hard-earned money to come see you, give 'em something to watch. Don't stand there like you've been Super Glued to the floor. MOVE, DAMMIT! Make eye contact with them once in a while. (This is easier when they're pretty girls, but in the absence thereof, at least pretend to look at the audience.) Nothing brands a band as a bunch of amateurs faster than for them to stand rooted to the floor, staring myopically at their guitar necks or keyboards the whole night.

 

Ian Anderson, Jimi Hendrix, and Jimmy Page were masters at this. Make big gestures. Move your entire body. You're playing to the back row. You're the size of their fingernail and they can't see you twitch your eyebrow like some blasted movie star.

 

I'm old school: They paid for a show. Give 'em one. Don't shine a bunch of stage lights in their eyes and call it entertainment. That's a lame trick to cover up for a band that's lacking. What 'cha gonna do if you're playing an outdoor gig in the blazing sun? The lights won't dazzle 'em then. It's up to you to make it worth their while to come out.

 

I thought the guy did just fine. Two thumbs up.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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-The fuckin showmanship. As silly as it is, the audience loves it.

 

I've always been very aware of the precise wording of the phrase, "I'm going to see a band."

 

Operative word: See.

 

The audience can listen to you anytime, anywhere, but if they pay their hard-earned money to come see you, give 'em something to watch. Don't stand there like you've been Super Glued to the floor. MOVE, DAMMIT! Make eye contact with them once in a while. (This is easier when they're pretty girls, but in the absence thereof, at least pretend to look at the audience.) Nothing brands a band as a bunch of amateurs faster than for them to stand rooted to the floor, staring myopically at their guitar necks or keyboards the whole night.

 

Ian Anderson, Jimi Hendrix, and Jimmy Page were masters at this. Make big gestures. Move your entire body. You're playing to the back row. You're the size of their fingernail and they can't see you twitch your eyebrow like some blasted movie star.

 

I'm old school: They paid for a show. Give 'em one. Don't shine a bunch of stage lights in their eyes and call it entertainment. That's a lame trick to cover up for a band that's lacking. What 'cha gonna do if you're playing an outdoor gig in the blazing sun? The lights won't dazzle 'em then. It's up to you to make it worth their while to come out.

 

I thought the guy did just fine. Two thumbs up.

 

Grey

 

Depends. If the keyboardist is the lead then yeah. Otherwise I much prefer watching a keyboardist that's all about focusing on his craft and leaving the stage show to the lead singer, guitarist or do-wop girls. I think too many band members trying to be "watch worthy" comes off looking lame.

 

Tony Banks comes to mind as one of the more boring keyboardist I love to watch.

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If all the members of the band are too active simultaneously, then yeah, sometimes it can be too much of a good thing.

 

Hendrix was always the center of attention--I'm not sure that anyone would care to compete with him for showmanship.

 

Ian Anderson was always the most active member of Tull, but John Evan also did his share and the various bass players were always in motion. Martin Barre less so. They managed to make it work well, indeed. I've always given Tull credit as being the best live act I ever saw, bar none. All the craziness, and yet tight as you could ask for musically.

 

Jimmy Page and Robert Plant were a good pair, both good at what they did and both working the audience. John Paul Jones was pretty much a perfect stick. Bonzo was a wild man, but was tied to his drum kit, so that limited him to some extent.

 

An unspoken assumption on my part is that the players who can't play are weeded out before the band hits the stage. They should never have been there in the first place.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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I think too many band members trying to be "watch worthy" comes off looking lame.

 

Heh. Ladies and Gentlemen, Vanilla Fudge.

 

[video:youtube]

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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Heh. Ladies and Gentlemen, Vanilla Fudge.

 

All that and whirly celestial lights, too.

 

That's old school. You had to entertain the audience without lasers, without holograms, and without shining lights in their eyes.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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I think too many band members trying to be "watch worthy" comes off looking lame.

 

Heh. Ladies and Gentlemen, Vanilla Fudge.

Excellent! I'm amazed the organist didn't dislocate something.

 

I've always been a fan of the subtle-but-sexy-shoulder-shrug so wonderfully demonstrated here at 2:33.

 

[video:youtube]

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I saw Genesis at their peak (Trick of the Tail) and was blown away by Tony Banks massively heavy, uber low Moog Taurus bass pedals. You get a pass on dancing around if you're using all 4 (or was it 5) limbs to make music.

 

Regarding Vanilla Fudge, the left hand playing is optional and available for waving around akimbo if you happen to have Tim Bogert on bass.

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You get a pass on dancing around if you're using all 4 (or was it 5) limbs to make music.

 

I'm not sure I want to know about that fifth limb.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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One of those synchronicity moments:

 

Victor Wooten on showmanship

 

Suddenly, an interview pops up that pertains to showmanship.

 

I know there aren't a lot of bass players here, but I think what he says in the third video is applicable, no matter what instrument you play. He's talking about engaging a jazz audience--that jazz audiences have dwindled because (and I'm paraphrasing here) the performers have gotten boring...they've got chops, but they're boring to watch.

 

Curiously, he says almost verbatim what I said earlier: That people come to see a band.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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Excellent! I'm amazed the organist didn't dislocate something.

 

Yeah, and I sometimes wonder the same thing about how this guy avoided migraine headaches while performing (Vince Crane from Atomic Rooster, check him out at 1:00 and 4:05 in this video):

 

[video:youtube]W_nD2Ki598E

 

Okay, so he committed suicide 18 years later... Easy to see why Carl Palmer bailed out on him to join ELP. Beware of semi-suicidal organ players! :keys2:

Kurzweil PC3, Yamaha MOX8, Alesis Ion, Kawai K3M
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Whatever you do, I say it's better when it's a team effort (and everyone plays along):

 

[video:youtube]kW00e_fQIRU

 

I think that applies whether it's an "energetic" performance, or something more focused:

 

[video:youtube]-CtgAgTqx0w

 

I can appreciate both of those styles (from among many other options). I think some consideration should be made about whether or not the performance fits the vibe of the song.

My music http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/Pk12

 

My Soundware (Kurzweil PC3)http://pksoundware.blogspot.com/

 

My Kurzweil PC3 Tutorials http://www.youtube.com/user/poserp.

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