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Way OT: Keurig Machine Question


Synthoid

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I received a Keurig coffeemaker as a gift about a year ago. I ended up buying the reusable cup accessory so I could make my own blend... as strong as I like. Anyway, after using the coffeemaker for several months, it seemed the amount of liquid in my cup was lower. (I always use the maximum water setting as I have large mugs).

 

The decrease didn't really bother me until this morning when I noticed the machine was working slower and producing a thinner stream of coffee. It stopped filling without even reaching the 3/4 level in my coffee cup.

 

So I'm curious... is this thing nearing the end of its life cycle already? Anyone else have experience with Keurig machines with some input/suggestions here?

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I use a Nespresso (they have a collection depot for recycling their aluminum pods) but they say to run a cleaning solution every few months. I've used white vinager - which works, then run a few cycles of plain water before brewing a cup. YouTube it.

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Rod

victoria bc

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I also tried that reusable plastic accessory. I was not satisfied with the result. There could be some debris on that nozzle

 

Maybe try a few regular Keurig cups to see if your machine is still not generating a full cup.

 

Could be something simple- as in you are not putting enough water in the canister.

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

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I'll try descaling it... should be easy enough.

 

I went to their website this morning for more info about working with reuseabe cups. It said no finely ground coffee, don't fill cups to the top, and no packing it down. I violated all three of those this morning.

 

I have to have a time out.

 

:(

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I'll try descaling it... should be easy enough.

 

I went to their website this morning for more info about working with reuseabe cups. It said no finely ground coffee, don't fill cups to the top, and no packing it down. I violated all three of those this morning.

 

I have to have a time out.

 

:(

 

But not until you've had your coffee. :)

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

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As long as we're talking about Keurigs, has anyone actually been able to get a decent cup of coffee out of their machine?

 

I've tried a variety of brands/blends of K-cups, and I've used the "Strong" setting on my machine, but the coffee still seems watery and weak. Curious whether others have managed better results or whether bad coffee is just the price you pay for Keurig convenience?

 

Noah

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Not to drive an off topic even further off topic, but I've discovered that the reusable coffee filters make a really good infuser for loose tea.

 

Just sayin'

 

Incidentally, just because it's spring water doesn't mean it doesn't have minerals dissolved in it. Just ask the whiskey makers in Tennessee and Kentucky. Their water is loaded with calcium/magnesium carbonate/phosphate, etc. Scotch whisky is made with water that's (generally) taken from quartzite or various igneous (e.g. basalt, etc.) rocks--totally different dissolved mineral load. Much less in quantity, but far more difficult to remove than carbonates, which respond well to common acids.

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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As long as we're talking about Keurigs, has anyone actually been able to get a decent cup of coffee out of their machine?

 

I've tried a variety of brands/blends of K-cups, and I've used the "Strong" setting on my machine, but the coffee still seems watery and weak.

 

Yes... that's why I bought the reuseable cup/filter thingy. You can use any coffee you like and make it nice and strong. Just follow directions.

 

http://coffee.germar.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/MKCUP_exploded.jpg

 

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I also tried that reusable plastic accessory. I was not satisfied with the result. There could be some debris on that nozzle

 

That was my experience, as well. At first the lid on the reusable pod would screw on nice and snug. But after many uses it seemed like it wasn't closing as snugly, causing water and grounds to seep out while the machine was trying to push the water through.

 

I wasn't cleaning the pod thoroughly after each use, just rinsing it out, so the lid was collecting a thin layer of residue that seemed to interfere with the lid's ability to create a snug seal. Of course, it might alao be that it just gets a bit loose after repeated use, but be sure to keep the pod clean, especially the underside of the lid and the holes at the bottom of the pod where the coffee squirts out.

 

Also, be sure to keep the little filter cup as clean as possible, especially if you're using finely-ground coffee, because the mesh tends to become clogged with coffee bean powder over time, making it harder for the machine to push the water through as easily, which further contributes to the coffee seeping out from under the lid.

Michael Rideout
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be sure to keep the little filter cup as clean as possible, especially if you're using finely-ground coffee, because the mesh tends to become clogged with coffee bean powder over time, making it harder for the machine to push the water through as easily

 

You can also buy replacement filters. :cofee:

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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As long as we're talking about Keurigs, has anyone actually been able to get a decent cup of coffee out of their machine?

 

I've tried a variety of brands/blends of K-cups, and I've used the "Strong" setting on my machine, but the coffee still seems watery and weak. Curious whether others have managed better results or whether bad coffee is just the price you pay for Keurig convenience?

 

Noah

 

There's a "strong" setting? I guess I bought an el-cheapo model that lacks that feature.

 

I like my coffee strong, and I could never get a satisfactory cup when using the reusable pod, so I searched the internet for advice and was surprised to read that coarsely-ground coffee works better than finely-ground coffee! Naturally, I was buying bags of espresso coffee because I wanted strong coffee, but it was a fine grind, so presumably the coffee wouldn't have been as watery and weak if I'd used something else. Also, a fine grind tends to clog up the mesh of the filter cup much more quickly.

 

I've given up trying to use my own coffee grounds in the reusable pod, because it never tastes as strong as when I buy the K-cups, so I just try to buy less expensive K-cups, and generally use the Keurig only for quick cups of coffee-- otherwise, I brew a pot with our Mr. Coffee that takes longer but makes a nice, strong coffee. But as far as K-cups, I usually buy Kroger Guatemalan, or Starbucks French Roast in the bulk size if it's on sale.

Michael Rideout
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You can also buy replacement filters. :cofee:

Or a real coffee maker.

 

:poke:

 

Or an expensive espresso machine operated by an Italian or Turkish* butler who makes the world's best espresso.

 

* Mmmm, Turkish coffee! Except those tiny little cups are way too small!

Michael Rideout
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I'm a life-long coffee snob. I buy recently roasted beans (<3 weeks, sometimes I get lucky and get 'em the day after roasting), grind them at the moment of brewing, and brew via pourover into a Chemex pot. Mmmm.

 

Some K-cups are not as bad as better than others; generally, anything found in a grocery store is old, and anything pre-ground started going stale when it was ground. So if you can find a K- vendor who is a roaster (I know of one), you might be able to get something reasonably fresh.

-Tom Williams

{First Name} {at} AirNetworking {dot} com

PC4-7, PX-5S, AX-Edge, PC361

 

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I'm a life-long coffee snob. I buy recently roasted beans (<3 weeks, sometimes I get lucky and get 'em the day after roasting), grind them at the moment of brewing, and brew via pourover into a Chemex pot. Mmmm.

 

Tom, you might consider wading into the water of roasting your own beans. I get greens (unfrosted) from Sweet Maria's in Oakland, a local biz committed to home roasting. He's a international coffee cupper, and their site has everything you'd ever want to know about roasting your own, choosing from their wide selection of amazing beans from around the world, etc.

 

I went off the deep end years ago and roast my own whenever I can. Roasting a pound only takes 15 minutes or so, and you cannot find a fresher roast. It has also helped me appreciate the commercially available beans from roasters that really care - Blue Bottle here in Oakland is a great source for freshly roasted beans of different varietals.

..
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I'm a life-long coffee snob. I buy recently roasted beans (<3 weeks, sometimes I get lucky and get 'em the day after roasting), grind them at the moment of brewing, and brew via pourover into a Chemex pot. Mmmm.

 

Tom, you might consider wading into the water of roasting your own beans. I get greens (unfrosted) from Sweet Maria's in Oakland, a local biz committed to home roasting. He's a international coffee cupper, and their site has everything you'd ever want to know about roasting your own, choosing from their wide selection of amazing beans from around the world, etc.

 

I went off the deep end years ago and roast my own whenever I can. Roasting a pound only takes 15 minutes or so, and you cannot find a fresher roast. It has also helped me appreciate the commercially available beans from roasters that really care - Blue Bottle here in Oakland is a great source for freshly roasted beans of different varietals.

Another home roaster here. Considerably less expensive to roast verses buying pre-roasted beans and you get a superior cup of coffee. Just dont try roasting inside your house unless you have a nearly airtight ventilation system (or arent married). I also get my beans from Sweet Marias. Purchased my air roaster from them, as well.

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I am Italian, with an Italian wife coming not too far form Naples.

 

She wouldn't drink a coffee made by any machine more modern than this one:

http://coffeegeek.com/images/5603/200x200/lapvonieuro.jpg

 

Positive side: coffee is great, the machine was expensive but it has been running (with some maintenance) for 26 years.

 

Maurizio

OB-6, Modx 7, Rameau upright. Too many Arturia, NI and AAS plugins.

http://www.barbogio.org/

 

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