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Finally came up with a glove solution I can live with


Josh Paxton

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For gigs in chilly conditions, I discovered something that seems so obvious I can't believe it took me this long to think of it. I've tried fingerless gloves, and I've tried full gloves that were thin enough to play in, and I didn't like either option. But not until last week did it occur to me to try both at the same time thin gloves underneath fingerless gloves. Turns out that works like a charm for me.

 

I first tried it with some super cheap dollar-store gloves underneath the fingerless ones. That worked well enough, but the cheap gloves were green (originally bought for a Dr. Teeth costume), and I wanted something less goofy looking. So I ended up getting some black thermal glove liners (which I didn't previously know were a thing) from Amazon, and they work great. I wouldn't want to try to play Rachmaninoff in suck a getup, but it lets me get around the keys well enough for pretty much any band gig while keeping my hands nice and toasty.

 

File under "things I wish I could go back and tell my 20-year-old self"...

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the cheap gloves were green (originally bought for a Dr. Teeth costume), and I wanted something less goofy looking.
I'm sorry, what town do you live in? :poke:;)

 

Cool tip, thanks!

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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A bass player Scott Devine uses a silk glove in his fretboard hand. He doesn't use the glove to keep warm, there is some kind of medical condition behind it. But, if that works for him it might work with keyboards too. Here's a video of him playing with the glove:

 

 

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Scott Devine has Focal Dystonia. Your brain sends distorted signals to your fingers and it causes involuntary movement and contractions. The gloves causes the brain to send different waves and stops the movement. I also have it and I get a lot of cramping with it and loss of function.
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http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_YmthGF1-eRM/TROQ5LZUgQI/AAAAAAAAANs/ceFGrEfgss8/s1600/80s-george-michael.jpg

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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the cheap gloves were green (originally bought for a Dr. Teeth costume), and I wanted something less goofy looking.
I'm sorry, what town do you live in? :poke:;)

 

Cool tip, thanks!

 

Obviously Josh, Bobby, and others play on the road in chillier places, but I couldn't help but chuckle. :poke:;)

:D Though I was giving him a hard time about being goofy looking in New Orleans...

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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When I was playing outdoors in Plymouth MA in the winter, this was a thing. One gig I played was 22 degrees F with a strong breeze. Froze my *ss off.

 

Now I'm in Florida, not so much of a thing :) Hey, sometimes it gets down to 50 degrees here.

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

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playing outdoors in 20 degree weather ... barbaric! coldest i ever played was about 40 degrees. my fingers were so cold it affected my playing alot.

 

my playing wasnt good enough to take a step down :)

The baiting I do is purely for entertainment value. Please feel free to ignore it.
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