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Joey D. continues to impress .....


Delaware Dave

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Mixing pop, jazz, blues and gospel and watching him maneuver the Hammond drawbars and switches, quite impressive. Also, the drummer is spot on and the guitar inflects the proper rhythm at just the right time in addition to his killer leads..

 

 

 

57 Hammond B3; 69 Hammond L100P; 68 Leslie 122; Kurzweil PC3; M-Audio Code 61; Voce V5+; Neo Vent; EV ELX112P; GSI Gemini & Burn

Delaware Dave

Exit 93 Band

 

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What I love about this guy - is that he has spent so much time on that organ now, it's just an extension of himself and every timbre/tone in his inner voice is speaking, singing, screaming, crying, whispering out of an electronic piece of musical machinery. So good. He also has never stopped musically stretching himself, there was a time when he was very committed to the jazz licks and tricks - but what organ style is he not touching on in this clip? Heck, his gospel sound is so very good in this clip! Too much? Is he overdoing it? Hell no, not for me at least. Loved it. The trio is so relaxed and groovy together... and it helps that 100 ways is just a great tune to begin with.

:like:

Yamaha CP88, Roland VR-700, Crumar Mojo, rebuilt 1910 Chickering 5'2", Fender Rhodes MKI 88k, Casio PX-560

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Does he still weigh about 700 lbs.? Dropping a few of those will help his legacy go on much longer...

 

My brother, this is NOT directed at you, but this topic comes up almost every time a Joey D thread comes up. Let it go.

 

Amen to this!! It pisses me off every time.

Endorsing Artist/Ambassador for MAG Organs and Motion Sound Amplifiers, Organ player for SRT - www.srtgroove.com

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I've been fortunate enough to see him twice, once with David Sanborn, and once with his own group. This particular video was done at a club literally just down the road. His guitar player is from Akron. Somehow I missed this gig. A mistake I hope not to repeat. Joey D is quite simply the B3 encyclopedia.
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Two comments:

1. Saw Joey D sitting in at a club with a larger group that had several other solo instruments. He seemed just as happy, and was just as good, when comping for other soloists as he is when playing a big solo. He just caresses other soloists.

2. Saw Dan Wilson just a week ago with the Christian McBride trio (that includes the young piano virtuoso Emmett Cohen) and Wilson killed it.

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I've watched this countless times over the past year. A while ago, I started something I rarely do: transcribe it.

 

My plan was to transcribe the melody, bass line and solo (except the gospel ending of course). I only scratched the surface before getting distracted with other things. But it really is a clinic.

 

I have to add one comment: I especially love his bass lines during the start of the tune.

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Thanks for posting. I saw them on this tour, but in Ontario. It was extra special because it was in an 80 seat recording studio. It was filmed as well. They seemed a bit tired that night though, and I think they mentioned having travel issues. Still a great show though.
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Joey is a master of the craft. I took his online class and thought he was a really cool (and warm) guy. He's very clear thinking, hard working, practical, open minded, and down to earth. All wonderful qualities in a person.

 

He said some things that didn't surprise me (I'm paraphrasing):

- Learn to be a great blues player because the blues is the mother of all music.

- Learn anything that appeals to you. All the stuff you learn goes into a funnel and out the bottom comes you.

- Hard work and patience is required.

 

And some that did surprise me:

- He could take apart and put back together a Hammond by the time he was 10 years old.

- He doesn't like the term clone. He thinks it's disrespectful. He said many of the portable organs are excellent and wishes we just called them organs because that's what they are.

- While he's learned how to decipher the notes on a page he can't actually read music.

- He's self-taught. So it took him a while to come up to speed on the terminology that's used to describe the sounds (e.g., scales) he had already learned so well by ear. When he played with Miles Davis, Miles was using musical terms that Joey didn't know to describe things Joey was already playing.

- To improve phrasing on the organ breath in and out like you're playing a horn. Let your breathing guide your phrasing (i.e., stop your phrase before you run out of air).

 

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Joey is a master of the craft. I took his online class and thought he was a really cool (and warm) guy. He's very clear thinking, hard working, practical, open minded, and down to earth. All wonderful qualities in a person.

 

He said some things that didn't surprise me (I'm paraphrasing):

- Learn to be a great blues player because the blues is the mother of all music.

- Learn anything that appeals to you. All the stuff you learn goes into a funnel and out the bottom comes you.

- Hard work and patience is required.

 

And some that did surprise me:

- He could take apart and put back together a Hammond by the time he was 10 years old.

- He doesn't like the term clone. He thinks it's disrespectful. He said many of the portable organs are excellent and wishes we just called them organs because that's what they are.

- While he's learned how to decipher the notes on a page he can't actually read music.

- He's self-taught. So it took him a while to come up to speed on the terminology that's used to describe the sounds (e.g., scales) he had already learned so well by ear. When he played with Miles Davis, Miles was using musical terms that Joey didn't know to describe things Joey was already playing.

- To improve phrasing on the organ breath in and out like you're playing a horn. Let your breathing guide your phrasing (i.e., stop your phrase before you run out of air).

 

Some interesting and helpful stuff there, especially the bold stuff.

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