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Getting vinyl into a Mac


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Depending on the degree of chlorination, vinyl plastics begin to soften and flow between about 170 and 250 degrees F. There is no sharp melting point. You can expect chemical decomposition to begin about 400 degrees F, and some nasty gases (such as vinyl chloride) will be given off - use adequate ventilation!
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You need a RIAA amp. Denon, Creek, Pro-Ject, Musical Fidelity offer quality gear that does not cost a lot of money.

 

If you can get your hands on a used Linn LK-1 (they usually don't cost much), buy it! LK-1 is a hifi pre-amplifier that has a very good RIAA amp. A used Naim pre-amp is also an alternative, but they are getting quite rare.

 

Avoid really cheap RIAA amps, they are seldom good.

 

/Mats

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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It might, but the problem is that the pickup has a very low output and needs to be amplified.

 

If you need something temporarily, buy a used quality hifi preamp and sell it when you are done. There's always demand for good gear.

Listen to a Linn and you will want nothing else, ever.

 

/Mats

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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Well I was curious, so I found this attributed to Mike Rivers on RACP back in '97:

 

I'm surprised that this isn't a standard preset on DAW software, but in a way it's a good thing it isn't. Most magnetic phono cartridges have output levels on the order of that of microphones, but are

designed, for proper magnetic damping, to work into an impedance of 47-100 K ohms. Most mic preamps will overdamp them with their input impedance of 1-2 K ohms.

Sounds like he knows what he's talking about :)
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No, it's not that easy. It is also a matter of impedance curves. If you don't use a phono pre, the pickup will not sound very nice. You could compare it with plugging a electric guitar straight into the line input of a mixer and we all know how lame that sounds. A good phono-preamp will actually make the pickup sound better. The RIAA curve is only one part of the equation, the least tricky part.

 

/Mats

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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I'd say amplify, compress, and EQ to taste.

 

Myself, I have a Pioneer amp that works just fine. It has regular phono inputs, and a preamp out. I just run directly from the Pioneer's preamp into PT. Then use plug-ins to boost level, EQ, and limit. Sounds good to me, and I'm fairly picky.

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Gotcha, thanks Mats! :thu:

 

I actually have a good phono amp in my Denon, but no turntable. Even when I do get one it will be a direct drive because I'm a heathen who wants to fiddle with the record :D

 

DJ mixers also have phono amps in them.

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There are a couple of turntables out there with RIAA amps built in. Pro-Ject has a nice one that is not very expensive.

 

Avoid direct drive turntables at all cost. They soud terrible or worse. Belt drive is your only option. The difference is like night and day. Really.

 

/Mats

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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Originally posted by Mats Olsson.:

Avoid direct drive turntables at all cost. They soud terrible or worse. Belt drive is your only option. The difference is like night and day. Really.

I know but I can't help it, I must go wiki wiki with it :freak:

 

Maybe I need one for the studio and one for the listening room? Yeah that's it!

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Originally posted by Bunny.:

You think there's really that much difference, Mats? I've owned several of both, and I tend to like dd turntables because they can't slip. No old belts to replace.

It's all about the sound. There's only ONE reason to use DD: faster start. DJ's need that. The rest of us will benefit from a more relaxed & natural reproduction of sound. All DD turntables transmit (tiny) motor vibrations to the pickup, the effect is that you will not hear everything that is in the groove. Listen to a quality belt drive turntable, the difference is HUGE! Belt drives don't cost more money either. Rega & Pro-Ject offer decent turntables for little money. Believe me, it is worth it, big time.

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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The Xitel requires that you also use a RIAA amp. Still, it looks like a cool unit.

 

Steinberg have a cheap package with their Clean! software and a RIAA amp. I suspect that the amp is not that good but you also get the software that has some cool features for removing noise and clicks. This solution might be just what you are looking for.

 

/Mats

http://www.lexam.net/peter/carnut/man.gif

What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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I plug my turntable into any one of many old recievers that accept Phono and Tape or aux, send tape out into a MOTU 2408 and record into Peak. You could also go right into the mac and into Sound Manager. The receiver takes care of the curve.

I've even linked different receivers this way. I have Receiver in my middle room for my 400 CD changer and one in my living room mostly for AV. Receiver 1 tape out to Receiver 2 tape in. If I want to listen to the 400 CD's through my living room speakers, just monitor tape input on receiver 2. It thinks it's getting a tape return feed.

 

Paul M. Brown

The Music Collective

www.TheMusicCollective.com

Paul M. Brown

The Music Collective

www.TheMusicCollective.com

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I'm not sure what you're asking. I simply send my turntable through the stereo receiver, then through my Apogee converter to my DAW. Of course, doesn't *everyone* here use their stereo receiver for their monitoring system like I do? :D
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Originally posted by nursers:

Thanks again guys :thu:

 

Mats - what's an RIAA amp?

web page quote:

"LP's are engraved with reduced bass levels and increased treble levels.

For the same sound level, a low frequency requires a larger groove which gives two drawbacks:

- Less recording time

- Difficulties for the cartridge to follow it and thus, higher distorsion

 

At the other end of the spectrum, the contact between the stylus and the groove makes noise, a high frequency noise. By increasing the high frequencies level during recording we can obtain a better signal/noise ratio as the noise is reduced by the playback curve.

 

Several other curves did exist before the RIAA but it replaced them completely during the 60'."

 

The above quote does not cover all aspects, the RIAA curve is applied at the cutting stage and when playing back a record you have to reverse the RIAA curve and this is the number 2 task for your phono preamp. Number one is amplification.

 

http://www.beigebag.com/images/riaa/riaa_1_1.jpg

As you can see, 1kHz is the 0 dB reference point. Without reference tones on the master tape, the cutting engineer can not align the tape deck relative to the RIAA amp.

 

http://home5.swipnet.se/~w-50674/hifi_pics/hifi_100pr/qsxm3_riaa_diagram.gif

 

A good web page if you want to know more details: RIAA explained

 

I have a long time passion for these things and could easily write a whole lot more about vinyl transcription.

 

/Mats

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What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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Nurser, this is what I did.

 

I bought a Ozone portable keyboard, that has XLR and 1/4 inch inputs, Firewire outputs into a IMac running Garageband. I found that the XLR input is channel one and the 1/4 input translate to channel 2 in Garageband. I take the headphone output of my stereo and with the right connectors, plug it in and press record. It's not top of the line, and probably doesn't do justice to the records, but I get to listen to my records ( and can even save them as .mp3's - Yeah I know, it's blasphemy).

I'm trying to think but nuthin' happens....
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