Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Were exp. pedals more common before velocity sensitivity?


Sundown

Recommended Posts

 

Don't get me wrong, they are pretty common now, but if every note came out at the same volume, I would think that would get pretty obnoxious. My first home keyboard didn't have velocity sensitive keys, but my first pro board did.

 

So in the days of the mighty Oberheims, Jupiters, and Memorymoogs, were expression pedals just a given?

Sundown

 

Just finished: The Jupiter Bluff

Working on: Driven Away

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 5
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Well, given that analog synths are the "next generation" beyond electronic organs, and were meant to serve a similar purpose (replacing an orchestra or band), it's not surprising that the early days saw expression pedals as the main modifier.

Eugenio Upright, 60th Anniversary P-Bass, USA Geddy Lee J-Bass, Yamaha BBP35, D'angelico SS Bari, EXL1,

Select Strat, 70th Anniversary Esquire, LP 57, Eastman T486, T64, Ibanez PM2, Hammond XK4, Moog Voyager

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back in the 1970s, polyphony was a tough nut to crack. Velocity sensing was even tougher.

 

Even the original MIDI committee had doubts about velocity sensing. They didn't believe it was important. By 1982, the two synths that were velocity sensitive - CS-80 and Polymoog - were no longer in production. Phil Dodds, project leader of the Rhodes Chroma which had just risen from the ashes of ARP by 1982, pressed hard for implementation of MIDI velocity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...