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OT: What's cooking?


Dave Bryce

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YMMV, of course.

 

dB

 

Yeah, it does: I never find it to taste as good. And, as 60 rapidly approaches, I haven't died yet from eating it that way, so I figure I'll live dangerously, and stuff it inside.

 

..Joe

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
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Took a few days vacation and did a lot of cooking, including 12 batches of chocolate candy icing. Went back to work and handed out containers of cookies, candy and brownies that I made from scratch. For Christmas dinner I only had to make mac and cheese, from scratch, using a roux that turns into a cheese sauce. For a pre-Christmas family gathering I made sausage balls, onion dip (it is hard to find good sweet onions this time of year), and my first attempt at gluten free cupcakes. The cousin that hosted our extended family gathering this year is on a gluten free diet and I was not going to walk into her house without something special for her.

This post edited for speling.

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Never been a great or trained cook. But 10 years of bachelorhood and necessity is the mother of invention.

 

I made Christmas dinner was nine. Rib eye roast (with mushrooms and horseradish), three ducklings (with orange glaze), sweet potatoes, bacon-stir fried green beans.

 

First time making duck - man, that's a fatty bird.

 

I have found the Joy of Cooking a priceless resource and guide, and my digital meat probe a good companion.

..
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If you like to cook, I highly recommend a top-flight instant read thermometer. The Thermoworks Thermapen is the standard in competition BBQ. You'll get a reading in 2 seconds, and the sensor is in the tip.

 

I have no connection to the company, but my Thermapen took my cooking game to a whole new level. Steak has never been the same. They are about a hundred bucks, and I got my whole family the less expensive Thermapop for Christmas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sundown

 

Just finished: The Jupiter Bluff

Working on: Driven Away, Gateway, Eighties Crime Thriller

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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Yup, the Thermapen is what I have (in black).

 

A few years ago I made a lamb roast that ended up a little more done than intended. Two weeks later a box arrived anonymously on my doorstep. Inside was a Termapen.

 

Ends up after my roast, my sister bought and shipped it quietly, without any fanfare. She's an ex-research scientist turned middle school science teacher. Gotta love my sister.

 

 

..
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Yup, the Thermapen is what I have (in black).

 

Yep. They are awesome... A bit pricey, but I can't tell you how many cheap thermometers I threw away. It's a great investment. :thu:

Sundown

 

Just finished: The Jupiter Bluff

Working on: Driven Away, Gateway, Eighties Crime Thriller

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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YMMV, of course.

 

dB

 

Yeah, it does: I never find it to taste as good.

 

Really? Because I add drippings from the pan before I bake it, I find it to taste exactly the same - just a lot less soggy. Man, I hate soggy stuffing....and I adore stuffing with a nice crust on it. :thu:

 

In general, I'm not a fan of soggy food. Just a personal preference thing. :idk:

 

And, as 60 rapidly approaches, I haven't died yet from eating it that way

Wait - I didn't realize that was a possible outcome.... :eek::D

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I stuff the bird, then when I pull the bird, I scoop it into a Pyrex dish, add drippings, and bake while the turkey cools and gets sliced. Allows me to get the perfect moisture level along with a crispy top.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I stuff the bird, then when I pull the bird, I scoop it into a Pyrex dish, add drippings, and bake while the turkey cools and gets sliced. Allows me to get the perfect moisture level along with a crispy top.

Tried that - it was still a bit too soggy for my taste...

 

...and for me, the revelation of putting the tangerines, pearl onions and garlic cloves into the bird instead and what that did to the taste of the bird and the drippings is just awesome. That's a factor as well. :cool:

 

For the record - I will happily eat stuffing that was cooked inside the bird. We're definitely talking shades of gray here....or, more accurately, brown in this case... :D

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I think I probably prefer it more soggy than you do because of how Mom used to make it :love:

 

But still, the crispy parts are the best....dipped in drippings. Ok, now my mouth is watering.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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The major (Dutch) city I come from isn't known for it's exquisite cooking habits. But I cook, and when (if) life is ok or great it would be rather fun at times, but I find that getting a ham cheese sandwich made that is well balanced, tasty to an at least mildly intellectual human being, and devoid of: grain that's hard to digest, emulsifiers I prefer out of the coming 7 years of mitosis of my body cells, cheese rennet that's not poisonous, and ham salt without nitrites, and on top of that is made from organically grown components is a ideological, financial and logistic challenge of at least the second order...

 

So, getting your hands on food components that do not smell like the various poisons in use in agriculture and average meat farming, and actually have taste, and preferably such that eggs don't taste like wheat, beans don't feel like asparagus, tomatoes that naturally combine with, well just about anything that nice and moderate sweet tomatoes should compare wth, and then, on top of that finding components that allow for that subtle and balanced extra that make for interesting cooking experiments, is hard, pretty hard.

 

Luckily as a kid I was blessed with sufficient nature knowledge to know what good carrots and lettuce tasted like before the industrial food revolution deemed necessary to apparently feed the babyboom, as well as more than sufficient discipline not to fall for the obvious, but still: only after a long time I think tasty foods at a higher level are a bit possible on the agenda, and I must say at the moment I don't like much industrially made food anymore, not that I wouldn't survive on it, but still.

 

So a pre-made, frozen pizza with organic components, some properly crispy special kind of lettuce, maybe with fitting organic herbs, and some well enough produces salmon filet and on another part tasty ham pieces is cool with me. A nasi goreng with organic components and fried banana is, too, but I have more demands: I prefer well working ceramic pans, and can take quite a while to prepare when I want (sulfur free and organic) wine and herbs to properly be used, and that fine oil for the right temperature, etc.

 

So, sometimes I get to make stuff that's beyond what I'm perfectly fine with: traditional dutch dished like cooked potatoes with beets and a well tasting, only midly expensive, hamburger and some ketchup and mustard. Organic, though.

 

Hey, I've gotten through the food names in this thread with very little translation help, I had not anticipated that.

 

T.

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If you like to cook, I highly recommend a top-flight instant read thermometer. The Thermoworks Thermapen is the standard in competition BBQ. You'll get a reading in 2 seconds, and the sensor is in the tip.

 

I have no connection to the company, but my Thermapen took my cooking game to a whole new level. Steak has never been the same. They are about a hundred bucks, and I got my whole family the less expensive Thermapop for Christmas.

Well there's another hundred bucks I can rack up to forum GAS! Yeah, I ordered one...

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Well there's another hundred bucks I can rack up to forum GAS! Yeah, I ordered one...

 

Ha! :thu: You won't regret it. They are an awesome device.

 

They are reasonably splash-proof, but don't submerge it in water... Just clean the probe end and keep the body of the unit dry.

 

Enjoy!

Sundown

 

Just finished: The Jupiter Bluff

Working on: Driven Away, Gateway, Eighties Crime Thriller

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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I'm famous for my spaghetti sauce.

 

When I was married, she showed me how to make the family spaghetti sauce that her mother brought over from Sicily.

 

Fast forward to post-divorce, move to new town with no good italian restaurants so I dug out the recipe and made the sauce again.

 

I tweaked it with real fresh herbs and really hit on a winning recipe. Even my uncle from mom's side - who NEVER liked italian food - liked my sauce. My dad grew up in an italian family but their sauce wasn't as good as mine.

 

Every year I go camping with college friends. Everybody makes something different for the saturday community dinner, but my sauce & meatballs are a staple. People go back for thirds, the ten quart pot is almost empty. Every time I make them for the company holiday party they are cleaned out.

 

I also make very good chicken speidies.

 

Didn't really starting cooking at home until I was about 40, and I really enjoy it.

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And, as 60 rapidly approaches, I haven't died yet from eating it that way

Wait - I didn't realize that was a possible outcome.... :eek::D

 

dB

 

Yeah. Aside from the personal preference as to how you like to eat it, there's been a groundswell over the last 15 years or so about not cooking it in the bird because of the danger that deep in the chest, the bird doesn't reach proper temperature, and bacteria from the juices can form in the stuffing.

 

..Joe

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
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And, as 60 rapidly approaches, I haven't died yet from eating it that way

Wait - I didn't realize that was a possible outcome.... :eek::D

 

dB

 

Yeah. Aside from the personal preference as to how you like to eat it, there's been a groundswell over the last 15 years or so about not cooking it in the bird because of the danger that deep in the chest, the bird doesn't reach proper temperature, and bacteria from the juices can form in the stuffing.

Yeah, sure, if you pack the stuffing in there...but that's just folks doing it wrong. :D

 

That's the other problem with the stuffing inside the bird - not enough room in under 20 pounders unless you pack it in. A nice 13 x 9 x 2, though...and all that crust... :thu:

 

dB

 

 

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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KC brethren never cease to amaze me. You cats are into everything in addition to KBs and music i.e. photography, bikes, running and cooking. :thu::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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KC brethren never cease to amaze me. You cats are into everything in addition to KBs and music i.e. photography, bikes, running and cooking. :thu::cool:

 

Hey, man - gotta eat, right? So why not take the time and effort to try and make sure that you can have the food you want whenever you want (pretty much) the way that you want it prepared? :idk:

 

Besides, cooking really is generally pretty easy - mostly common sense combined with giving yourself permission to trust your instincts and creativity...

 

...and then there's the side benefit that the cook frequently gets out of the after meal cleanup. :D

 

Coq au vin (after sitting in sauce in the fridge for two days) sandwich on Dutch Crunch roll by way of panini press. Serious win. :2thu:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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...and then there's the side benefit that the cook frequently gets out of the after meal cleanup. :D

 

^^^ This.

 

If I had to clean up, we'd be eating out of a can every night. I'll gladly cook.

Sundown

 

Just finished: The Jupiter Bluff

Working on: Driven Away, Gateway, Eighties Crime Thriller

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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Yeah. Aside from the personal preference as to how you like to eat it, there's been a groundswell over the last 15 years or so about not cooking it in the bird because of the danger that deep in the chest, the bird doesn't reach proper temperature, and bacteria from the juices can form in the stuffing.

Yeah, sure, if you pack the stuffing in there...but that's just folks doing it wrong. :D

 

That's the other problem with the stuffing inside the bird - not enough room in under 20 pounders unless you pack it in. A nice 13 x 9 x 2, though...and all that crust... :thu:

 

dB

 

 

Usually if anything, the problem people have is the breast drying out before the thighs are done, thus the tent. I like to cook at a lower temp for a longer time which helps ensure more consistent temp throughout, plus pulling out the stuffing and baking a bit longer ensures it's thoroughly cooked and creates those awesome crispies.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Usually if anything, the problem people have is the breast drying out before the thighs are done, thus the tent.

Fully agreed on the tent - maximizes control over skin doneness as well. :thu:

 

dB

 

 

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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...and then there's the side benefit that the cook frequently gets out of the after meal cleanup. :D

 

^^^ This.

 

If I had to clean up, we'd be eating out of a can every night. I'll gladly cook.

The solution to that, that seemingly few home cooks get, is to clean up as you go. There's nothing so depressing - and unnecessary - as to be faced with a mountain of pots and pans with caked on and baked on food that has dried and turned into concrete after a nice meal. My girlfriend and I cook a lot for ourselves and guests, and by the time we are ready to serve, everything has at least been rinsed off and is ready for or already in the dishwasher. The only thing left to deal with after the meal are the serving dishes, plates, silverware and glasses, which I typically like to at least mini clean immediately also while everything is still water soluble. Nothing to it once you get in the habit.

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

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Fifteen years ago I became more conscious of healthy eating and started eliminating nasty stuff like transfats and HFCS.

 

You can avoid them largely by cutting back on eating out. Razor slim profit margins have forced many restaurants and fast food places (ESPECIALLY the national chains) to use a lot of junk. I was in the cafeteria at work one day and there was a jug of "butter flavoring" on a tray. A quick peek at the ingredients listed transfats at the top. There's a REASON why national chains have been resisting the push to list nutrition tables on their menus...

 

You still see TF and HFCS in a lot of grocery items so a lot of people stopped buying them. The suppliers noticed and many now have dumped the junk and put prominent "no TF" or "no HFCS" labels on the packaging. But the corn syrup industry has been lobbying to rename HFCS...

 

When I was doing free weight training, it did not go unnoticed that I never saw a muscular person eating at a fast food place.

 

I'll gladly make my own meals. Picking up dishes never stopped me, and it's nothing once you get into the habit.

 

At events like the NAMM show it's hard to avoid eating out. The cafes at the convention hall are very expensive ("captive audience"...). I usually stay at the Hampton Inn because I can get a good breakfast there. After breakfast I would grab a couple of slices of bread and packs of PB and jelly from the buffet, pack the bread in sandwich bags I brought on the trip, and make a PB&J sandwich for lunch at the show.

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The solution to that, that seemingly few home cooks get, is to clean up as you go. There's nothing so depressing - and unnecessary - as to be faced with a mountain of pots and pans with caked on and baked on food that has dried and turned into concrete after a nice meal. My girlfriend and I cook a lot for ourselves and guests, and by the time we are ready to serve, everything has at least been rinsed off and is ready for or already in the dishwasher. The only thing left to deal with after the meal are the serving dishes, plates, silverware and glasses, which I typically like to at least mini clean immediately also while everything is still water soluble. Nothing to it once you get in the habit.

 

There's no room for a dishwasher where I live and I learned quickly that "clean as you go" is the easiest way to cook.

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...and then there's the side benefit that the cook frequently gets out of the after meal cleanup. :D

 

^^^ This.

 

If I had to clean up, we'd be eating out of a can every night. I'll gladly cook.

The solution to that, that seemingly few home cooks get, is to clean up as you go. There's nothing so depressing - and unnecessary - as to be faced with a mountain of pots and pans with caked on and baked on food that has dried and turned into concrete after a nice meal. My girlfriend and I cook a lot for ourselves and guests, and by the time we are ready to serve, everything has at least been rinsed off and is ready for or already in the dishwasher.

Oh, I'm totally with you there. When I said after meal cleanup I was only talking about the dishes, glasses, cutlery etc that was on the table.

 

I always clean as I go - don't dig cooking in a messy kitchen. When my turkey goes in the oven, the only sign that I've been in the kitchen is the foil covered 13 x 9 x 2 with stuffing in it sitting in the counter awaiting it's turn in the oven.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Hey, man - gotta eat, right? So why not take the time and effort to try and make sure that you can have the food you want whenever you want (pretty much) the way that you want it prepared? :idk:

 

Besides, cooking really is generally pretty easy - mostly common sense combined with giving yourself permission to trust your instincts and creativity... dB

I agree 100%. :thu:

 

Yet, it never ceases to amaze me to meet so many people who cannot cook. You don't even want them to boil water. :laugh:

 

I've always loved to eat so it was imperative that I learned how to cook. Hanging out in the kitchen with my mom helped. :)

 

While I still eat out too, it can get expensive. Cheaper to buy groceries and make it happen. It also goes over well with them... ;)

 

I also clean up as I go. I do not want to deal with a mountain of dirty dishes. The kitchen has to be right at all times. :cool:

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I'm famous for my spaghetti sauce.

 

When I was married, she showed me how to make the family spaghetti sauce that her mother brought over from Sicily.

 

Fast forward to post-divorce, move to new town with no good italian restaurants so I dug out the recipe and made the sauce again.

 

I tweaked it with real fresh herbs and really hit on a winning recipe. Even my uncle from mom's side - who NEVER liked italian food - liked my sauce. My dad grew up in an italian family but their sauce wasn't as good as mine.

 

Every year I go camping with college friends. Everybody makes something different for the saturday community dinner, but my sauce & meatballs are a staple. People go back for thirds, the ten quart pot is almost empty. Every time I make them for the company holiday party they are cleaned out.

 

I also make very good chicken speidies.

 

Didn't really starting cooking at home until I was about 40, and I really enjoy it.

Well how 'bout a recipe big guy?

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We're throwing down recipes?

 

Alrighty then. Here's a fave that's handy to have around after the turkey dinner:

 

TURKEY TETRAZZINI

 

1/2 c. butter

1/2 c. flour

1 1/2 tsp. salt

¼ tsp nutmeg

¼ tsp cayenne

2 c. milk

1 can (12 oz.) chicken broth

2 egg yolks

1/2 c. light cream

1/3 c. dry sherry

1 pkg. (16 oz.) spaghetti

4 c. cooked turkey, in large pieces

1 can sliced mushrooms

1/2 cup celery

½ cup diced onion

1 c. grated sharp cheddar cheese

Parmesan cheese

Bread crumbs

 

Make sauce: Melt butter in saucepan stir in flour, salt, nutmeg and cayenne pepper until smooth. Gradually stir in milk and chicken broth; bring to boil, stirring constantly. Boil gently, 2 minutes or until mixture is slightly thickened.

 

In small bowl beat yolks with cream. Gently beat in a little of the hot mixture. Return to saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until sauce is hot do not boil. Remove from heat and add sherry.

 

Cook spaghetti as to package directions; drain. Add 2 cups sauce to drained spaghetti and toss until well blended. Add turkey, celery and mushrooms to remaining sauce.

Turn spaghetti into 12 x 8 x 2 inch baking dish. Spoon turkey mixture over top. Sprinkle with cheddar cheese, then cover top with Parmesan cheese and bread crumbs.

 

Bake in preheated 325 degree oven covered 25 minutes; uncover and bake 10 minutes more or until piping hot.

 

:drool:

 

==

 

dB

 

 

 

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I'm famous for my spaghetti sauce.

 

When I was married, she showed me how to make the family spaghetti sauce that her mother brought over from Sicily.

 

Fast forward to post-divorce, move to new town with no good italian restaurants so I dug out the recipe and made the sauce again.

 

I tweaked it with real fresh herbs and really hit on a winning recipe. Even my uncle from mom's side - who NEVER liked italian food - liked my sauce. My dad grew up in an italian family but their sauce wasn't as good as mine.

 

Every year I go camping with college friends. Everybody makes something different for the saturday community dinner, but my sauce & meatballs are a staple. People go back for thirds, the ten quart pot is almost empty. Every time I make them for the company holiday party they are cleaned out.

 

I also make very good chicken speidies.

 

Didn't really starting cooking at home until I was about 40, and I really enjoy it.

Well how 'bout a recipe big guy?

 

Two cans of crushed tomatoes

One garlic bulb

Olive Oil

One carrot

1/4 onion (or onion salt)

Fresh basil

Fresh oregano

Italian style meatballs

 

1) peel and chop 6-7 cloves of garlic

2) cook chopped garlic in layer of olive oil in ten quart pot on medium fire. Cook until garlic is light yellow (not brown).

3) add crushed tomatoes, stir

4) add chopped carrots, stir

5) add chopped onions (or onion salt), stir

6) add shredded basil (about fifteen leaves), stir

7) add shredded oregano (about fifteen leaves), stir

8) add meatballs

9) stir occasionally on medium low fire at least twenty minutes

 

Feeds four, preparation time ~one hour

 

Don't make the fire too hot or it will burn the sauce and change the flavor. You want the sauce in the pot to bubble mildly but not splatter too much. I prefer gas stove as the fire is easier to control. Electric stoves can get too hot.

 

Don't fret over the carrots, there's really no "carrot" taste in the sauce. Chop them tiny enough and you'll never notice them. They absorb tomato acid & sweeten the sauce - no sugar needed. That's how Sicilians make their sauce.

 

Tomato puree does not taste the same.

 

The secret is the fresh herbs. As you cut the leaves, note that the cut edges are wet - this is the juice that adds flavor as it cooks. Dried herbs don't have the juice. Few restaurants go to the trouble of adding herbs in sauce.

 

Fresh basil/oregano can be hard to find. The packaged leaves will work fine as long as the leaves are still on the branches. If you're lucky enough to find potted herbs, keep them on a windowsill that gets plenty of sunlight and keep them watered.

 

Good enough, big guy? :laugh:

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