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DocPate

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I remember buying a book in a used bookstore on Medieval modes. I taught myself to play in every one of the original church modes, & in every key, & that pretty much taught me where everything was on the fretboard, by relating everything to a tonic & a scale degree.
Scott Fraser
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I took classical piano lessons from 7-13. I hated every minute of it, but it did teach me to read.

 

At 14, my first guitar teacher taught me to read (Mel Bey Book One)in first position as well as the rudiments of reading TAB.

 

Not surprisingly, my Blues teacher, Philadelphia Jerry Ricks did not write anything down, insisting that I listen and emulate the sounds I was hearing.

 

I didn't read standard notation at all for about 35 years until my first Jazz teacher started me reading again.

If you play cool, you are cool.
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I never really learned the notes and as of today still have to think about where many of them are when I try to name them at random. I played by ear until I ran into my one and only teacher (which was a jazz standard guy that taught by having students copy his renditions of 5 or six songs and then you were to come up with your own rendition of each). This is where I started learning the notes and interval numbers for chord structure and patterns (some of which I already knew). I was only with him for about 3 or 4 months as I was moving out of the area, so I didn't really have much time to spend with him and learn a whole lot more. He told me he couldn't teach me to improvise as that had to come from within. He demonstrated his abilities to me and how they related to the songs I was copying him on. But, that one word stuck with me as I had heard him improvise to many songs and any pattern I could come up with. I knew that would be my quest from that day on...he did show me how to figure out any note on the fret board using the root tone on the 6th and 5th string. And apply it to the 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st string. I can always figure out any note on the board, I just don't have to think about them all that much LOL!

 

Anyway, long story short...I bought a book by David Lawrence "Teach Yourself Improvisation" and began my quest through all the scales, tonal centers, notes, intervals, modes, etc. It really helped me a ton, but I was still needing something I just couldn't put my finger on [pun intended]. So, I found another book titled "Teach Yourself Lead Guitar" which basically got me started throwing out notes using the Pentatonic blues scales. That was a big leap into the world of improvisation as my ear was stuck in that vibe. Later in life I started putting those other scale modes back in (especially the major and minor scales). Later than that, I started putting some melody lines back into my licks...now I just pick up the guitar and do what my teacher couldn't teach me...my own Improvisation and chord arrangements. I'm getting back into my rhythm guitar and improvising with my chords and strumming techniques as well. I have purchased DVD jazz and rockabilly lessons and also use free YouTube lessons a lot...

 

I still have to stop and think now and then to discover which notes and which chords I'm playing LOL! I'm just an eternal student and I can't thank my old friend and teacher enough... :cool:

 

Take care, Larryz
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Nice posts people. I was reminded that I did play cornet in the school band during 7th and 8th grades. I also play a little piano/keyboard so I can read music and improvise a bit. But didn't associate guitar to music theory etc. until much later in my guitar playing life.
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@Bro. Larry,

 

We are all eternal students. I think that's the best part of playing the guitar (or any musical instrument), there's alway more to learn. For me, it's the journey that matters - not the destination.

 

I can totally relate to your appreciation of your teacher. I am forever indebted to my four teachers and I feel privileged and humbled to have passed on their knowledge to my own students.

 

Have a Merry!

 

Bro. Fred

If you play cool, you are cool.
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Did anyone else learn like me?

 

I've never had formal Guitar lessons, nor any formal training in Music Theory. I started out learning songs by ear and rote practice. The first song I learned was The Animals' version of House of the Rising Sun, like a whole generation of Guitarists: I think I was 9? For the next few years, I learned songs from slightly older kids, who had little or no idea about Chords, Scales, or anything regarding Music Theory; they just tuned their Guitars, and tried to figure out some of the sounds they were hearing on the radio. I expect that, in our ignorance, most of us were playing horribly butchered, but sincere versions of the songs we loved.

 

Later on, I had some songbooks, and some chord books, but what really changed it for me was a chord book by Happy Traum, that had the Formulas/Equations for constructing Chords from the Major Scale (1-3-5, etc.). Here was the connection I'd been looking and listening for, and I dove in.

 

Sight reading, to the degree that I can do it, is something I taught myself, slowly and painfully. My skill level in that regard is much like someone with a passable knowledge of a foreign language, reading the daily newspaper in that language; some passages will still trip me up, but I keep trying.

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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@Bro. Larry,

 

We are all eternal students. I think that's the best part of playing the guitar (or any musical instrument), there's alway more to learn. For me, it's the journey that matters - not the destination.

 

I can totally relate to your appreciation of your teacher. I am forever indebted to my four teachers and I feel privileged and humbled to have passed on their knowledge to my own students.

 

Have a Merry!

 

Bro. Fred

 

While I always agree with you Brother Fred, here's something I heard from a wise old man, that may sound like a little different approach LOL!

 

It's not the journey through life that matters, it's the people you meet along the way...

 

A Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year to you and to all our fellow Forumites!

 

Sincerely, Larryz :cool:

 

ps. I started out on the Clarinet and played in the school bands from 1959 when I was 9 years old to about 1964. I still have fond memories of Mr. Tonini, my 1st real music teacher...

 

pss. I always feel guilty telling people I've played guitar for 50 years or so and some little 6 and 7 year old kids can dust me on YouTube LOL! Makes me want to throw all my guitars in a pile and burn them! Tommy Emmanuel does the same thing to me...just jealous I guess. One good thing about it though, I always have more to learn! :thu:

Take care, Larryz
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I've quoted this a few times over the years in this forum....

 

ANDRES SEGOVIA once, when asked how it feels to be the world's "greatest guitarist" told the interviewer, "You'll have to ask HIM. I'M still learning!" ;)

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Did anyone else learn like me?

 

 

Hard to say since it looks as though you edited out whatever that way was...

 

No, A String edited the link out.

 

Goodbye folks. I don't participate in any forum where censorship takes place.

:idk

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@DocPate,

 

Man, that link must have contained some hard core stuff. Sorry I missed it. Speaking of hard core, I'd really like to see Melania and Ivanka Trump in a hot lesbian scene. (I'm probably going to be punished by the Mods for that last sentence.)

If you play cool, you are cool.
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I may have over reacted. I'll give A String the benefit of the doubt.

 

Here are the words from the link that AString edited out.

 

Thinking back to when I first started playing guitar, I really didn't know the notes on the fretboard. I learned from a chord book and then from my cousin. I recall saying things like:

 

Third fret, second string. Didn't even know without thinking it was a B string much less the note was D

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Did anyone else learn like me?

 

 

Hard to say since it looks as though you edited out whatever that way was...

 

No, A String edited the link out.

 

Goodbye folks. I don't participate in any forum where censorship takes place.

:idk

 

Watch out kids, Doc seems to've misplaced his potential resignation inside his quoting of me---much as some might hope otherwise, I'm here for the duration.

d=halfnote
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