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How hard is jump?


J. Dan

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We joke about this, but I see stuff all the time looking for a jump patch. It's the most freaking basic double saw with no filter, env or anything, just straight double saw with a little chorus and reverb. Done.

 

It's always the preset junkies. It saddens me that people can't get the freaking Jump sound. It saddens me more that the presets that pretend to be jump include pitch EG's, just sayin.

 

It's just sad to me Thst people know so little about their gear that they can't make a freakin Jump patch, the most basic sawtooth period. Can anybody explain to me how a patch could be more simple?

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Because there are two types of keyboard players, those who understand synths and those who don't.

 

I have crossed over from the latter to the former but only just. I managed that mainly by dissecting presets in soft synths and paying attention to the synth threads and comments here, including yours Dan.

A misguided plumber attempting to entertain | MainStage 3 | Axiom 61 2nd Gen | Pianoteq | B5 | XK3c | EV ZLX 12P

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I am the preset musician who knows the basic stuff to make things sound better than what comes as presets.

However it surprises me how quickly people are satisfied with their results.

The Kronos 2 famous synth patches for instances, sound a kind of lifeless compared to how the originals sound.

And most of the 'jump' patches out there sound no where near the obx-a original.

Every rompler i have had contained a horrific attempt of a jump patch.

I was also curious how to get THAT sound from the original record.

The integra-7 was my first synth that was able to recreate an organic killer jump patch and not some lifeless sample playback synthsaw/ brass that pales in comparison with the original.

Of course you are right that many musicians (like me) know far to little about basic synth programming.

But i have extremely good ears and think that many attempts made by people who know how to programm and A brands still suck in capturing that vintage sound. Surely it is impossible on a rompler or even VA, but that is why preset players ask for a jump patch....... they hear what's severely lacking in the given placebo preset attempts. 'That does not sound like jump'......'anyone out there that knows how to create a jump patch ' ??

 

 

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Offering up a different perspective:

 

Why can't people do what took you years of study to gain the experience necessary for programming even a basic synth sound? I think you underestimate your skill set. Programming a synth (even a patch as simple as Jump) takes time to learn how to do. When people ask for a Jump sound they are looking for someone like yourself to help them along. In time, perhaps, through experienced instruction they will start to piece it together. Sometimes we forget how hard things are once we get really good at it. Try teaching a 5 year old boy how to tie his shoe and you'll quickly be reminded that it wasn't always so easy. 😁

 

Plus, some keyboardists are primarily players, not programmers. They just aren't wired to have much interest in programming synths. Different strokes for different folks. I'm too much of a lover of sound to be that way, but that's my cross to bear.

Live rig: Roland FA-08, Yamaha MOTIF ES 6, laptop for supplemental sounds.
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Because there are two types of keyboard players, those who understand synths and those who don't.

 

I don't envy anyone who came up with menu-based synths that require extensive menu diving to program. I played an ARP Odyssey throughout high-school in the 70's, and there's nothing like having dedicated controls to learn sound-shaping. Of course, the lack of presets meant that programming was inherently part of playing a synth. You either learned it or you didn't perform with 'em.

 

Sculpting sound was part of the sheer magic of the instrument back in the day, and I can't help feeling like the appearance of presets is one of the factors that converted us keyboardists from players of instruments to players of simulations. I can live without the weight (in fact, I can't handle it anymore!), but I'm looking for the complete playing experience, not just sounds, when I shop for instruments.

 

Back then, you had to program to cover a song with synth in it. This had the effect of filtering out the riff-raff. Either a band found a player who could handle synths, or they didn't play those kinds of tunes ( or left out key parts if they were lame). These days, it's a different world, but presets only can take you so far. And in sound-sculpting, lies magic.

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It's the most freaking basic double saw with no filter, env or anything, just straight double saw with a little chorus and reverb. Done.

 

Now do that on 5 different (of today´s) synths and it will sound all different,- and it won´t sound like it did/does on the OBX-a, in Eddies studio, w/ Eddies FX processing and printed to tape which adds tape compression in addition especially when driven into the red which was the common recording exercise in the past and when using tape,- maybe together w/ some analog compression and EQ while recording, or in the mix.

And the FX, may it be a simple chorus and/or reverb,- those were hardware in the past, stomp box or rackmount,- the modulation effect possibly pure analog,- they have a sound too and it´s not the same than today´s keyboard-onboard digital FX.

 

Also have in mind, when copying patches being used in famous recordings, the programmer is always listening to a sound being embedded in a MIX,- so you don´t know exactly how it sounds when being separated.

 

Today there might be occasions on youtube getting separated takes for comparisons, but also there, it´s already the digitized Youtube sound then.

 

Anyway ...

The audience won´t care if it´s the original sound or not since it is the original RIFF they want to hear,- so any plain double-saw chorused patch might do it.

 

A.C.

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I don't know, most keyboards come with a "Jump" preset and they generally sound fine to me, the ones I've tried at least...especially mono...you aren't going to get that same lush reverb sound from the album in mono no matter what the programming.

 

I've been diving into my DAW a lot recently for home recording, and unlike live where I'm in mono and usually minimize the effects (a lot of live rooms we play in), the effects make such a huge difference. Yesterday I was demoing a reverb plugin by Valhalla (killer) and so went in to turn off the patch effect on a nice synth sound. Wow, the thing sounded extremely thin and weird, which I guess is to be expected. A super-dry sound isn't something you normally hear unless you hang in certain studios and anechoic chambers....

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AC is strong in the force. He is right.

 

Yamaha and Korg digital Jump patches range from suck to just licks a little. This is one area Roland actually does pretty well at.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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I don't know, most keyboards come with a "Jump" preset and they generally sound fine to me, the ones I've tried at least...especially mono...you aren't going to get that same lush reverb sound from the album in mono no matter what the programming.

 

I've been diving into my DAW a lot recently for home recording, and unlike live where I'm in mono and usually minimize the effects (a lot of live rooms we play in), the effects make such a huge difference. Yesterday I was demoing a reverb plugin by Valhalla (killer) and so went in to turn off the patch effect on a nice synth sound. Wow, the thing sounded extremely thin and weird, which I guess is to be expected. A super-dry sound isn't something you normally hear unless you hang in certain studios and anechoic chambers....

 

The essence of my post above is:

 

When you nitpick,- it´s never the same.

 

When you just only want to get the job done,- take the preset available in your gear and play the tune.

 

Live, I don´t use any reverb b.t.w. and up to now I never used native plug-in software live.

 

And,- I don´t need a "Jump" patch at all because I don´t cover top 40 stuff may it be past or present.

 

A.C.

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It's just sad to me Thst people know so little about their gear that they can't make a freakin Jump patch...

 

Why would anyone want to? The song sucks.

'55 and '59 B3's; Leslies 147, 122, 21H; MODX 7+; NUMA Piano X 88; Motif XS7; Mellotrons M300 and M400’s; Wurlitzer 206; Gibson G101; Vox Continental; Mojo 61; Launchkey 88 Mk III; Korg Module; B3X; Model D6; Moog Model D

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Or they could, just buy Dave Smith and Tom Oberheim's OB-6, and recreate the sound.

Of course, one would also need a 61-note controller to more effectively play this song after said purchase. :poke:;)

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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We joke about this, but I see stuff all the time looking for a jump patch. It's the most freaking basic double saw with no filter, env or anything, just straight double saw with a little chorus and reverb. Done.

I also used to add a touch of polyphonic portamento on my OB-8 back in the day.

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I never play Jump because I don't play with bands that do it, but apropos of all this I'd like to think that there are others like me fairly well versed in synthesis theory but not having the time or inclination to tweak filters, envelopes, oscillator waveforms, etc., to "nail" a sound whose "nailing" will make little or no difference to the music being played or the enjoyment of said music. Certainly much less of a difference than the ability of a band to play well together would make.
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I could post the song on hear. To annoy ya! :crazy:

[video:youtube]

 

Hear the special out of tune effects....priceless :crazy:

 

it sounds really good when played on mini keys.... and if you are stoned out of your mind.

 

The shame of all this is that most of the audience could not tell the difference.

'55 and '59 B3's; Leslies 147, 122, 21H; MODX 7+; NUMA Piano X 88; Motif XS7; Mellotrons M300 and M400’s; Wurlitzer 206; Gibson G101; Vox Continental; Mojo 61; Launchkey 88 Mk III; Korg Module; B3X; Model D6; Moog Model D

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Can someone send me the patch settings for "Living on a Prayer"?

 

I'll tell you what gear I own later.

 

It's B-22 on one of your boards, midi'd to Bank 1, patch 12 on the second board. No, not that one, the other one. No, up an octave. Well then open the filter a little.

 

There you go.

 

You're welcome.

 

 

..
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No respect for rock lore... tsk tsk. You guys have changed :)

 

Jump set the world on fire, bow down to all of its glory. And Livin' took a ragtag gang of jersey boys around the world and over 100M album sales. RESPECT.

The baiting I do is purely for entertainment value. Please feel free to ignore it.
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