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Is this music?


Muad’Dib

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I have noticed with the increase in analog synths, and modular synthesizers. That there, are a lot of people who are musicians, but are only making bleep, bleep noises and, running the occasional sequencer, and turning a knob or plugging in a patch cord.

 

I can't listen too it, for too long. I am used to music, with harmony, and, melody.

 

Although far be it from me, to not create experimental music myself.

 

What are your thoughts?

 

I do have a lot more questions, but I did not want to start multiple threads.

 

Paul

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I guess it would depend on your taste of music. Musicians are very diverse people in general. The older I get the less synth music appeals to me unless it is the old bands such as Yes, ELP, etc. I like songs with a good melody also you stated above.

 

Music is in the ears of the beholder!

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Bleeps and blurps are for the twiddler not the listener. It can be a highly therapeutic and zen experience to patch and tweak things while hearing immediate results.

 

However, though I have enjoyed birthing many bleeps, I don't enjoy listening to somebody else's.

 

Alas others don't feel that way, and post their every endeavor.

Moe

---

 

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If it was me. I would say: C, B, and A. With A being the least, and C the best, but music is relative to the listener. What one person would call noise. Someone else would call it music.

 

It's, like comparing a Jackson Pollock to a Monet. Even in the art world, every thing is relative to how one interprets, art. Some will think, splattered paint is not art. Even though I have seen it. In, a Modern Art Museum.

 

I think I was being too harsh, with my original, question? I should not have said, they were claiming to be musicians. I guess, you don't, have too be skilled in playing an instruments, in order to create music.

 

This is just my opinion though.

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A "good musician" is also heavily debated term.

 

One who plays their instrument virtuosically to critical and/or audience acclaim?

One who plays many instruments virtuosically audience and/or critical acclaim?

One who plays their instrument to the sonic satisfaction of their fan base?

One who can sit in with the widest stylistic situations and play to their peers satisfaction?

One who plays one particular style exceptionally well to their peers, critics, and audience satisfaction?

One who knows not to over play and fits into the ensemble tastefully - defined by the musical style?

One who makes other people's most complex of musical machinations come to audible life?

Or must one compose (successfully) to be a good musician?

Are singer song writers the definition of a good musician?

Are song writers that can't sing good musicians?

 

The variety of skills is really wide. I would imagine we all have our own opinions based upon our heroes and those we desire to emulate the most - even if we ultimately fall short or succeed in a different direction.

 

 

Yamaha CP88, Casio PX-560

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A "good" muscian is someone who can draw an audience to listen to their music even if it is contemplative silence or, heaven forbid, all they own or can 'play' is a DAW.

A misguided plumber attempting to entertain | MainStage 3 | Axiom 61 2nd Gen | Pianoteq | B5 | XK3c | EV ZLX 12P

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I would differentiate good music from a good song. Something that sounds cool can be good music, but to be a good song means it has to be crafted into melody, harmony, some sort of structure and send a message or tell as story.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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The best music will stand the test of time.
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Moe's observation is a good one. But then again I've seen bands who were really into what they were doing onstage when most of the audience would rather have them just take a break. Charles Ives' music was rarely heard by anyone but himself during his lifetime. There's no law that says you shouldn't follow that path. Your music might end up being 1000 times more creative if you stop trying to please everyone and only please yourself.

 

I've tried to remain open to all types of music and sound. And to save judgement to when I really understand the music. There is music that I know and love, music I'm trying to better understand (more listening required) and some that I'm indifferent to because I haven't spent enough time with. And there is some I'm just bored with because I've heard it once too many times. But in general, it's just music/sound and it's not going to hurt you, so try to embrace if you can. I didn't get into this whole music thing thinking I would only play and listen to the music of my youth.

 

Busch.

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My standard poke in response to this:

 

Every instrument is technology. If we found a violin on an alien planet, instead of ours, we would conclude they were highly intelligent and incredibly advanced. A piano even more so--iron-casting, curved and mathematically exact wood-milling and shaping, an insanely nuanced relationship between a pedal on the ground and the physical resonance of strings inside a box, the key-to-hammer relationship itself. Again, if we found it in an alien world instead of our own, we would think they were smarter than us.

 

Not only that, but every instrument is a technological replacement for something more "musical" and organic prior to it. Drums are a modern technology designed to replace gourds. Trumpets are brass-forged updates of conch shells. Shakers are contemporary seed-pods. Flutes are fake bamboo shoots. And so on.

 

Each generation is convinced that the next one's technology is going to be the end of Art, Beauty, and All Things Holy. And each "next" generation marches on indifferent to the previous one's concerns, because, well, why wouldn't they?

 

Blips and bloops can be "music" (however you personally define that) the moment one stops noticing that it is a blip or bloop, and starts hearing it as a component in a larger expression. The challenge for most folks is hearing narrative in "new" sounds, to the same extent that they hear it in familiar ones. And similarly, there is a challenge, when using "new" sounds, to produce a viable narrative.

 

But every one of our familiar sounds, started as a blip or a bloop, no different to previous generations than, say, EDM is for many of those on this Forum. We have all, in our time, ended Art, Beauty, and All Things Holy. And so it should be, and so it shall continue to be, forever and ever amen.

Now out! "Mind the Gap," a 24-song album of new material.
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^^^

This is pretty fair. It's all music. The challenge of the adventurous music creator is to bring the listener along for the ride. Using some conventions or expectations in form, timbre, melody, harmony etc. to grasp at so the experienced listener can "get" it. The more aspects of your audience's music you purposefully diverge from, the more difficult it is for the listener to figure out wtf you're up to. And even then is it bad music? In the ear of the listener.

Yamaha CP88, Casio PX-560

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Classic music, with a melody and harmony are my vote; generating noise is not my bag.

 

If you can't play, you can make noise I guess...no different than the argument of regular music vs. rap, as in "it's easier to talk than sing".

 

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True!

 

Of course there are instruments and software that are built and designed to make you sound like a musician, without having to do a thing.

 

Somebody, had to break the rules at some point and say, I am going to come up with something totally different.

 

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