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Pranked my guitar player last night.


MuzikTeechur

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Someone posted this idea for a prank on FB a few weeks back.

We were returning from a motorcycle tour of the Canadian Maritimes last night and I happened to glance at the clock (we trailered the bikes and were in my truck) 8:43 - no time like the present!

So, I texted my guitarist....

http://i65.tinypic.com/2u7t6c9.png

Muzikteechur is Lonnie, in Kittery, Maine.

 

HS music teacher: Concert Band, Marching Band, Jazz Band, Chorus, Music Theory, AP Music Theory, History of Rock, Musical Theatre, Piano, Guitar, Drama.

 

 

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Well, actually my response to "Are you serious?" was about 20 minutes later. I'm pretty sure he double-checked his calendar in the meantime.

Muzikteechur is Lonnie, in Kittery, Maine.

 

HS music teacher: Concert Band, Marching Band, Jazz Band, Chorus, Music Theory, AP Music Theory, History of Rock, Musical Theatre, Piano, Guitar, Drama.

 

 

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My favourite prank (I'm ashamed to admit) was to our singer. He was having trouble finding his note coming into the bridge. He asked me to give him his starting note.

 

Which I did.

 

Only it was a semitone flat...

 

A few dirty looks, and a few laughs, then ensued.

 

Cheers, Mike.

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this is gold. As others have said though, just wait for the payback. :P

 

I've occasionally given a bass player a cheeky Eb or F when they've asked for an E for tuning. The look on their face when they think they're further out of tune than they were expecting...

Viscount Legend, Leslie 142, Nord Stage 3 HA88, Rhodes MK1 1977, Moog Sub 37, Dave Smith Rev2, Juno 106, DX7
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I've occasionally given a bass player a cheeky Eb or F when they've asked for an E for tuning.

 

I start with an E and then pitch-bend it a bit. Their facial expressions are priceless. :)

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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We were practicing REO Speedwagon "Keep On Loving You". It opens with piano. The song is in F, so as a prank I played the piano opening in E then when the whole band played the big bang F chord they all looked at each other as in WTF...?
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For some reason the text isn't showing when I load this thread. Nor is my avatar...

 

Muzikteechur is Lonnie, in Kittery, Maine.

 

HS music teacher: Concert Band, Marching Band, Jazz Band, Chorus, Music Theory, AP Music Theory, History of Rock, Musical Theatre, Piano, Guitar, Drama.

 

 

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Haha...good stuff. A couple spring to mind for me:

 

1) our drummer had this riser he took everywhere with him. one night as he was rolling his road cases out to his van, we stood the entire riser behind the curtain at the back of the stage. it took him forever to find it.

 

2) i started jump in c# and the band followed without a hitch. our singer knew something wasn't right. he kept looking around like "wtf?"

Korg Kronos 61 (2); Kurzweil PC4, Roland Fantom-06, Casio PX-350M; 2015 Macbook Pro and 2012 Mac Mini (Logic Pro X and Mainstage), GigPerformer 4.

 

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I've tuned horn players a half-step out before too, a lot of fun. :laugh::evil: You play the chord, hold the sustain pedal and then silently bring down the right keys so it looks like you're tuning them properly, but little do they know... Hehehehehe.

 

The horn players in your band actually tune before a gig?! :o

'57 Hammond B-3, '60 Hammond A100, Leslie 251, Leslie 330, Leslie 770, Leslie 145, Hammond PR-40

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One of my ongoing pranks has become a band tradition.

 

I get a nice, extended solo in the middle of "Ain't No Sunshine". After getting bored with the usual piano/organ stuff, one night I pulled out a cello chorus and cranked it. A huge, reverberating sound took over an otherwise boring song.

 

Everyone's head swiveled as in "WTF is that?"

 

Next time, they were expecting it again. Sorry, bagpipes this time. Time after that, ethnic flute. And then a warbly Moog lead. Followed by a choir. Followed by harpsichord. Tuba. And so on.

 

Now it's become the norm -- what will we hear this time? So I go back to playing the usual piano/organ just to keep them on their toes.

 

Makes an otherwise grindy tune fun for everyone.

Want to make your band better?  Check out "A Guide To Starting (Or Improving!) Your Own Local Band"

 

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I had a similar one once, only it was for real!

 

The drummer called: "Hi, Carlo, where are you?"

"Why, I'm home."

"Are you crazy? We're doing soundcheck at the rock festival."

"What are you talking about, the concert is tomorrow!"

"Wrong... the concert is today ,starting in an hour"!

 

Luckily, the concert was in town. I frantically loaded my keyboards in the car, drove like a kamikaze, and made the concert start just a few minutes late. No soundcheck for me that time!

 

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Btw I have played a couple of classic ones myself. Once I arranged a song one half-step higher than requested - you should have seen the singer's face... :D

 

A more elaborate one was to record a sequence on my Kurzweil K2000 and play it very quietly during soundchecks. It consisted of very sparse, very subtle and very strange noises coming at the most asymmetrical moments, interposed with long pauses. I used to just start it and walk away, so nobody looked at me as the culprit, for a while at least. The sound man went absolutely crazy! :evil:

 

After a few gigs, I couldn't hold my laughs anymore.... While the poor sound man was trying to take apart the guitar player's equipment, I exploded in hysterical laughter, apologized and said, "Sorry, it's me" - and raised the output on the Kurz to show everybody where those crazy interferences came from.

 

For some reason, the sound man didn't strangle me right away.... but I bought dinner for him that night. :)

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very sparse, very subtle and very strange noises coming at the most asymmetrical moments, interposed with long pauses.

 

No way - that just ain't fair!

 

Although... why didn't the sound man just mute *everything* and check for silence? Then bring each channel in one by one: "OK so it's the keys". Plug in a signal generator at the stage end of the cable: "my PA's fine, your keyboard's f***ed, end of".

 

Cheers, Mike.

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very sparse, very subtle and very strange noises coming at the most asymmetrical moments, interposed with long pauses.

 

why didn't the sound man just mute *everything* and check for silence? Then bring each channel in one by one: "OK so it's the keys".

 

Our sound guy has a habit of over-muting channels to avoid feedback when we are setting up. Of course no matter what I say, he hasn't grasped the fact that an electronic keyboard doesn't ever cause feedback.

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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Our sound guy has a habit of over-muting channels to avoid feedback when we are setting up. Of course no matter what I say, he hasn't grasped the fact that an electronic keyboard doesn't ever cause feedback.

 

Perhaps he does this to avoid pops and crackles as leads get plugged/unplugged? And maybe he calls that "feedback"? (I got very little here, work with me...)

 

Cheers, Mike.

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A long time ago, probably early 90s, we were practicing and the guitar player just brought a processor and ran direct, so it was coming out of the same PA as the keys. I pulled up a guitar fret noise patch and watched his hands. Every time he moved his had I'd trigger the sound, trying to change it up appropriately based on how far and fast his hand was changing positions. It was pretty convincing. I could see him really starting to get frustrated and then he looked over at me and figured it out and busted up laughing.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Our sound guy has a habit of over-muting channels to avoid feedback when we are setting up. Of course no matter what I say, he hasn't grasped the fact that an electronic keyboard doesn't ever cause feedback.

 

Perhaps he does this to avoid pops and crackles as leads get plugged/unplugged? And maybe he calls that "feedback"? (I got very little here, work with me...)

 

No problem. :laugh:

 

Thing is, even after everyone has plugged in, he's a bit slow with un-muting. But what I was trying to say is, while a mic or acoustic guitar pickup can feedback during the pastor's message, the keyboard can't.

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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