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Hank Williams's tribute to Prince Rogers Nelson.


d  halfnote

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Stunningly Mr Wms. seems to've anticipated early 21st C events in the arts in a way few would've expected.

 

This song has some truly heart-rending qualities but the last verse [ 2:20 onward] has given me pause.

 

[video:youtube]

d=halfnote
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Oy..........

 

That bit about the "purple sky".

 

That's stretching things a bit. Next, some dink will try to claim that Sheb Wooley's "Purple People Eater" was a prediction of Prince becoming an avenging angel.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Hank might have got the idea from when that Deep Purple falls over sleepy garden walls and the stars begin to twinkle in the sky...and came up with the silence of a falling star lights up a purple sky...then Prince might have caught the deep purple idea for Purple Rain and Jimi came up with Purple Haze and then comes smoke on the water from Deep Purple...etc. :cool:
Take care, Larryz
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Stunningly Mr Wms. seems to've anticipated early 21st C events in the arts in a way few would've expected.

 

This song has some truly heart-rending qualities but the last verse [ 2:20 onward] has given me pause.

 

[video:youtube]

 

Nice. I see (hear) what you mean, half'.

 

This thread would make more intuitive/automatic sense to everyone if it were over beers, sodas, 'n' drinks after-hours in a dimly lit haunt... after which everybody would note that they loved the sound of that train in the distance, everybody would believe that it's true...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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This thread would make more intuitive/automatic sense to everyone if it were over beers, sodas, 'n' drinks after-hours in a dimly lit haunt... after which everybody would note that they loved the sound of that train in the distance, everybody would believe that it's true...

 

And the more beers, sodas & drinks, the more sense it will all make. I'll have a double, please, no rocks.

Scott Fraser
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This thread would make more intuitive/automatic sense to everyone if it were over beers, sodas, 'n' drinks after-hours in a dimly lit haunt... after which everybody would note that they loved the sound of that train in the distance, everybody would believe that it's true...

 

And the more beers, sodas & drinks, the more sense it will all make. I'll have a double, please, no rocks.

 

:wave::D:cool::2thu:

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Read his post again, then listen to the last verse...

 

I still say how can anyone equate Hank to Prince, as if it was some sort of "prophetic thing" foreseeing the death of a rock and roller 67 years later. Come on guys he wrote the word purple sky in a song 68 years before Prince died. No connection really. No offense, but that is a stretch of the imagination at very best.

 

However that song is one killer sad song. Very well done as a song of his time and feeling. One of the very best cryin and weepin country tunes ever done. Hank was a genius....

 

Hank died on January 1, 1953,

 

According to Colin Escott's 2004 book Hank Williams: A Biography, Williams was inspired to write the song when he found it on a schedule of upcoming MGM releases. The song was recorded on August 30, 1949 at Herzog Studio in Cincinnati, Ohio. Williams is backed by members of the Pleasant Valley Boys - Zeke Turner (lead guitar), Jerry Byrd (steel guitar), and Louis Innis (rhythm guitar) - as well as Tommy Jackson (fiddle) and Ernie Newton (bass).[3] As Escott observes, the plaintive despair in Williams' voice on the recording is echoed by the backing of the musicians:

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Bob Dylan recalls, "Even at a young age, I identified with him. I didn't have to experience anything that Hank did to know what he was singing about. I'd never heard a robin weep, but could imagine it and it made me sad."

 

During his Aloha from Hawaii TV-special, Elvis Presley introduced it by saying, "I'd like to sing a song that's...probably the saddest song I've ever heard."

 

The Road to Nashville, singer k.d. lang states, "I think 'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry' is one of the most classic American songs ever written, truly. Beautiful song."

 

"Hear that lonesome whip-poor-will/He sounds too blue to fly,"

 

The above clips and quotes are courtesy of Wikipedia...A great and classic song to be sure. :cry:

 

+1 I'll have me another bartender, neat, and make it a double...

Take care, Larryz
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@Larry:

 

"Bartender" is one word. Otherwise, it sounds as if you want the BAR to be tender. ;)

 

But + tons on that song being a true classic, and the idea of Hank being a genius.

 

aside: 'Round here, hippies were BIG on purple as a color. Likely due to the fact that here in Detroit, OUR version of HAIGHT-ASHBURY was a street named PLUM. Yeah, spent many a day and night hangin' out on Plum St., and I bet if I dig deep enough, I might find one of my old medallions, or that necklace made from apple seeds. :D

 

As far as "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" goes, CASSANDRA WILSON does a mighty tasty cover of it. You can find it on her "New Moon Daughter" CD.

Whitefang

 

PS: On that CD she also does a fine cover of "Last Train To Clarksville". :)

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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@ Fang, Hey BarTender thanks for the Spelling Bee info...

 

I was reading about the Navajo Code talkers last night and came across the Japanese calling their secret code in WWII, the Purple Code. Then I started thinking about the Romans dressing Jesus in the royal color to mock him...and then Purple Haze all in my brain came to mind! Somehow I managed to doze off...

 

The Monkees will be singing The Last Train To Clarksville again on their 2016 tour! Who would have seen that coming? And, AC/DC are on tour too this year, WOW! You can tell I'm just waking up with my 1st cup of coffee... :cool:

 

 

 

 

Take care, Larryz
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The Monkees will be singing The Last Train To Clarksville again on their 2016 tour!

 

Somehow the idea of the Monkees without Davy Jones just seems kind of sad, the oldies but goodies version.

 

And, AC/DC are on tour too this year, WOW! You can tell I'm just waking up with my 1st cup of coffee...

 

But with Axl Rose on vocals, & no Malcolm.

Scott Fraser
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+1 Scott, one of my favorite bands was the Marshall Tucker Band. I went to see them a couple of years ago and without Toy and Tommy Caldwell on vocals it just wasn't the same. My musical friends wanted me to go see CCR without John Fogerty, and I declined...I will go see him live if I get the chance! :cool:
Take care, Larryz
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Yeah, it doesn't always work. But YES with Rabin instead of Howe worked OK, so did KANSAS with that little dude replacing Walsh was OK too. And so is JOURNEY with that Korean kid replacing Perry.

 

Somehow, CCR without Fogerty would seem like some third rate tribute band.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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+1 Scott and Fang! For me, CCR without Fogerty would be like going to see The Rolling Stones without Mick Jagger... :crazy:

 

Ps. back to Hank, I do like some of the duets I have seen like Natalie Cole singing with her dad on video and Hank Williams Jr. singing with his...

Take care, Larryz
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^We did a lot of Sr. and Jr. material in my old country rock band along with other outlaw country from Nelson, Daniels, Jennings, Cash, etc. One Jr. song I still like to do today is Family Tradition. Jr. sings about his father: "I am very proud, of my daddy's name, although his kind of music, and mine, ain't exactly the same"...always loved that line.

 

I like a lot of Jr's greatest hits and I think he's done a great job in following in his dads' footsteps. Quite a successful singer songwriter...

 

My daughter hates it if I play There's a Tear in my Beer as heard in the video, and so I dedicate the song to her as a joke when we get together for a cabin jam LOL! I only play it for her if she's in the audience at home. Her husband plays it with me and gets a kick out of it too! It reminds me of when I hated to listen to Sr. and other country station crap when I was a kid and my dad would play it on the way to and from our fishing hole a couple hours away! I was into rock and roll and he wouldn't allow me to change the station! Later in life I found a place in my heart for Hank Sr. and Jr. and many many others... :cool:

Take care, Larryz
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I too, don't have the "out of hand" dismissive attitude towards country music that many of my contemporaries do and did. Growing up, there's be a smattering of country artists' songs played on the same radio stations that predominately played rock'n'roll.

 

Songs like(and going back to) "Abelline", "Help Me I'm Falling", "El Paso", "I Walk The Line", "King of The Road", "Saginaw Michigan", "Hillbilly Heaven".

 

And you gotta remember. In the very early days of rock'n'roll you often had to search through the "Country/Western" bins at the RECORD STORE( remember THOSE?) to find platters of some of your favorite rock'n'roll artists. The Everly Brothers are a prime example of this.

 

Even as late as the latter 1960's the AM "rock'n'roll" stations played "Harper Valley P.T.A." a lot, and IT was a huge country hit.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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It didn't go the other way around. Those Country snobs would not allow rock and roll on their stations. Elvis was turned down on the Grand Old Opry with his rendition of Blue Moon of Kentucky. He did a whole country album, none of which got played on the country stations...now days, I can't tell the difference between new country and a rock station. I guess I'm going back to my deja vu boycotting of the new country stations again LOL! :steve:
Take care, Larryz
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Growing up in 50s & 60s Los Angeles, there were 2 Top 40 radio stations, & they both covered the entire range of popular music; rock, soul, r & b, elements of folk, as well as occasional country. The genres were not hard & fast categories then & the marketing was much less focused on demographic distinctions. There was a lot of schlock then too, but it was much more open minded than anything we've heard in the last 30 years or so.
Scott Fraser
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Growing up in 50s & 60s Los Angeles, there were 2 Top 40 radio stations, & they both covered the entire range of popular music; rock, soul, r & b, elements of folk, as well as occasional country. The genres were not hard & fast categories then & the marketing was much less focused on demographic distinctions. There was a lot of schlock then too, but it was much more open minded than anything we've heard in the last 30 years or so.

 

+1 Scott. The New York stations were doing the same thing. You could hear, Cream, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, The Cowsills, Paul Mariat, Jose Feliciano, Mason Williams, Sly & The Family Stone, B. J. Thomas, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, and Roger Miller (King Of The Road), all in the same hour of programming.

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

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Growing up in 50s & 60s Los Angeles, there were 2 Top 40 radio stations, & they both covered the entire range of popular music; rock, soul, r & b, elements of folk, as well as occasional country. The genres were not hard & fast categories then & the marketing was much less focused on demographic distinctions. There was a lot of schlock then too, but it was much more open minded than anything we've heard in the last 30 years or so.

 

+1 Scott. The New York stations were doing the same thing. You could hear, Cream, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, The Cowsills, Paul Mariat, Jose Feliciano, Mason Williams, Sly & The Family Stone, B. J. Thomas, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, and Roger Miller (King Of The Road), all in the same hour of programming.

 

Along with Tiny Tim, Mrs Miller, the Ramsey Lewis Trio, Ian Whitcomb, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles, Richard Harris, Dionne Warwick, etc. A very wide range of artists & styles.

Scott Fraser
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+2 In the days of AM radio there were fewer stations to choose from, so they had to cram as much into one station as they could. I appreciated the variety in the programming of rock and roll, jazz standards, soul, pop, country, etc. That's what I play today LOL! :cool:
Take care, Larryz
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+2 In the days of AM radio there were fewer stations to choose from, so they had to cram as much into one station as they could. I appreciated the variety in the programming of rock and roll, jazz standards, soul, pop, country, etc. That's what I play today LOL! :cool:

 

And, I daresay, as a result, our musical world view must be considerably wider than that available to kids growing up on today's radio.

Scott Fraser
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^You're right on Target Scott! The kids don't even listen to the radio anymore...they go to Pandora and Spotify and down load their favorite genre specific songs. Pretty soon the FM stations will just fade away like the AM stations did. Pretty soon there will be empty DJ mics and turntables with spider webs all over their booths, like the empty Blockbuster video stores... :cry:
Take care, Larryz
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Well, I listen to the radio regularly, and you can still find a wide variety of music there, but YES, it IS more genre specific these days.

And I remember back to free form FM radio in the late 60s - early 70s; I was exposed to a lot of great stuff there. Though the DJs sounded rather stoned sometimes - of course, back then I usually was, too, LOL.

I think there are still kids out there who are curious about what's out there beyond the pop format (I sure HOPE so!), and today with YouTube, they can explore endlessly and at little or no cost. Hopefully this will lead to them supporting the ARTISTS, but that's a well beaten horse.

 

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Well, I listen to the radio regularly, and you can still find a wide variety of music there, but YES, it IS more genre specific these days.

And I remember back to free form FM radio in the late 60s - early 70s; I was exposed to a lot of great stuff there. Though the DJs sounded rather stoned sometimes - of course, back then I usually was, too, LOL.

I think there are still kids out there who are curious about what's out there beyond the pop format (I sure HOPE so!), and today with YouTube, they can explore endlessly and at little or no cost. Hopefully this will lead to them supporting the ARTISTS, but that's a well beaten horse.

 

I don't listen to the radio at all, given my musical interest in 30's-60's Jazz and Blues.

 

I do agree wholeheartedly that YouTube is an incredible resource. I've mentioned in previous posts that I am placing some energy behind getting my Travis and Piedmont style acoustic chops back. Recently, I was trying to remember how to play Blind Boy Fuller's Step It Up and Go (a really fun tune to play). This is a pretty obscure piece of music. Signed on to YouTube and there it was. Fuller playing the tune. Here it is.

 

 

A few days ago, I was in the mood to listen to some Dusty Springfield (one of my favorite 60's pop vocalists). No problem. Opened up YouTube and just about her entire catalog was available for free! I don't buy music anymore. YouTube and Pandora are wonderful free resources.

 

When studying a new Chord Melody solo, I often listen to several different versions of the piece by many different artists on various instruments to see if I can steal any cool ideas. Again, YouTube is an invaluable resource in this research.

 

I am indebted to Brother Larryz for turning me on to it a few years ago.

If you play cool, you are cool.
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