Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Hey Joe


p90jr

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 34
  • Created
  • Last Reply

That song(by Hendrix) was VERY popular among the "hippies in training" in my town about 1967 or so, and I recall the local "underground" rock station WABX one day, in 1968, playing 24 different versions of the song back-to-back to illustrate how far BACK it went, and how well covered it was! Some of them were pretty cool!

 

I'm now wondering which song has more "covers"....

 

"Hey, Joe", or John D. Loudermilk's "Tobacco Road", which at last count was over 200!

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ P90, According to your Wiki The Leaves recorded it (1965) before Love (1966) which is different than your other thread post, so I'm not sure who did it 1st...but, many of the versions were very closely recorded at or near the same time, along with the Byrds (1966) and Jimi (1966) Wilson Pickett (1969), The Surfaris, etc. the list goes on and on...

 

I like Wilson and Jimi's versions who slowed the original song down...

 

<---like Roy Buchanan's slow version in '74...this is the studio version, but I liked his live in Austin Texas version the best with all the volume swells...

 

It was/is a great song recorded by just about everyone... :cool:

 

 

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

<---like Roy Buchanan's slow version in '74...this is the studio version, but I liked his live in Austin Texas version the best with all the volume swells.. :cool:

 

I saw Roy Buchanan Live at the release of his second album in Wildwood NJ one night. He introduced this (Hey Joe) song as one as done by his favorite guitar player Jimi Hendrix. Then he did a version of it with the Star Spangled Banner Hendrix style as the lead break. The room was slightly filled with local guitar players about 50 of us, no one ever heard of that guy before except guitar players. He stunned us that night with his guitar magic and that was one of the highlights. He also made that Telecaster talk in English without a single gizmo (Talk box). Just his brain, his fingers, and that Tele/Vibriolux combo. Just amazing and to this day I never saw a better concert........True Story!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ P90, According to your Wiki The Leaves recorded it (1965) before Love (1966) which is different than your other thread post, so I'm not sure who did it 1st...but, many of the versions were very closely recorded at or near the same time, along with the Byrds (1966) and Jimi (1966) Wilson Pickett (1969), The Surfaris, etc. the list goes on and on...

 

I like Wilson and Jimi's versions who slowed the original song down...

 

<---like Roy Buchanan's slow version in '74...this is the studio version, but I liked his live in Austin Texas version the best with all the volume swells...

 

It was/is a great song recorded by just about everyone... :cool:

 

 

Yeah, that's an interesting thing... Love got it from The Byrds through one of their guitarists who was a Byrds roadie, and Love claim their buddies The Leaves stole it from them, and that the lyric change of "where you going with that money in your hand" to "gun in your hand" happened when The Leaves asked Love for the lyrics and they changed that line to play a joke on them. The Byrds and Love version both have the original lyric, so that seems to prove true. So, The Leaves beat them all to recording it, but The Byrds popularized the song in L.A. in their live sets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ DBM, I special ordered a DVD of Roy's Live From Austin Tx (1976), it only has 5 songs including Hey Joe and I'm sure glad I have it...and just like you say DBM, there are no pedals or tricks, It's just him! :cool:

 

@ P90, yeah, I noticed that lyric change LOL! I like it better with "that gun in your hand"... :2thu:

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In LA the Leaves version was a top 40 hit, so that was the first version I heard.

I do think "gun in your hand" makes better sense lyrically, given the story line. That's how folk music works; one person learns a song from another & little changes creep into the DNA of the song. Eventually it turns into something else.

Scott Fraser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The weird thing about this song is that I guess I, like most people, thought it was a folk song from the early 20th Century... but it was written in 1962 and underwent its compressed time metamorphosis in the L.A. folk and coffee shop circuit then rock gigs.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't ever recall hearing it BEFORE Hendrix, and was informed soon after that it was some older tune. Same with "Louie, Louie".

 

Plus, Like Scott claimed, there've been songs I learned with some different lyrics than they had originally, but DAMN if I can recall them NOW!

 

Of course, "Hey, Joe" isn't the ONLY song to have experienced this sort of thing( yeah, I DID briefly mention "Louie, Louie" up there). Maybe one of the BETTER ones, though! :)

 

I'VE had some personal experience with "Move It On Over", if some might recall! :D

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It reminds me of House of the Rising Sun, I just thought it was an Animals song growing up (one of my favorite groups in those days). Turns out to be a very old folk song. According to Wiki, it was 1st recorded in 1934 by Tom Ashley and Gwen Foster. Tom said he learned it from his grandfather...I love playing it in E minor... :cool:

 

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It reminds me of House of the Rising Sun,

 

Larryz you made me do it, I just have to jump in here, House Of The Rising Sun is the very first song I learned on guitar, on my Stella acoustic no less. I did learn the single note version of Sunshine Of Your Love before that, which got me hooked on guitar, but House was my very first tune with full chords and all the way through the song. I probably could not play it today without Googling the chord progression, it has been that long since I played it, perhaps 48 years or so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's see... my mom would have those songbooks : "Biggest hits of 1977!" and she'd play the songs on the piano and sing along. I think she had every year going back to when she was a kid in the 50s, so there was a stack of them... and when I started playing guitar I dug back through them for cool stuff. They'd have simple chord diagrams above the piano sheet music. Whatever year that was ('64, '65) had "House of The Rising Sun," so that was one I learned... then a few pages later was "For Your Love," which was in a different key but I recognized that it was based on the same progression for the first couple of bars of the verse... that was a step for me learning that there's just patterns in music you can decipher.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lotta people don't realize how well-covered a number of songs are.

 

First one comes to my mind is "Unchained Melody". Song was done like 15 times in 1955 alone, every version of which cracked the top 40 in its respective country, nearly a decade before the Righteous Brothers got hold of it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lotta people don't realize how well-covered a number of songs are.

 

:facepalm::rolleyes: :smirk: You're not kiddin'! :D

 

A selected, though probably incomplete and not fully unabridged, list of recorded versions of "Me and Bobby McGee": (Mebeh I'll hafta come up with my own sick oscillating-echo-laden Reggae/Dub version to add to the foam-jawed fray... :crazy: )

 

1969 Roger Miller on the album Roger Miller

 

1969 Kenny Rogers & The First Edition on the album Ruby, Don't

Take Your Love to Town

 

1970 Ramblin' Jack Elliott on the album Bull Durham Sacks & Railroad Tracks

 

1970 The Statler Brothers on the album Bed of Rose's

 

1970 Gordon Lightfoot on the album Sit Down Young Stranger

 

1970 Kris Kristofferson on his debut album Kristofferson (Kristofferson's version also appears in the film Two-Lane Blacktop)

 

1970 Bill Haley & His Comets on the album Rock Around the Country. (According to the biography Bill Haley by John Swenson, Kristofferson gave Haley's version his seal of approval.)

 

1970 Sam The Sham from the Atlantic single "Me And Bobby McGee/Key To The Highway" (Atlantic #2757)

 

1971 John Mogensen single release (And on the 1973 album "John" (Danish lyrics: Carsten Levin)

 

1971 Janis Joplin U.S. number-one single, and on the album Pearl

 

1971 & 1972 Jerry Lee Lewis (single, flip side to "Would You Take Another Chance on Me") and on the album The Killer Rocks On

 

1971 Dottie West on the album Have You Heard...

 

1971 The Grateful Dead on the album Skull & Roses, and numerous other live recordings

 

1971 Loretta Lynn on the album I Wanna Be Free

 

1971 Lalla Hansson recorded the song in Swedish on his debut album Upp till Ragvaldsträsk as "Anna & mej".[5][6] scoring a Tio i topp hit.

 

1972 Johnny Cash on the live På Österåker

 

1972 Jeannie C. Riley on her album Give Myself a Party

 

1973 Waylon Jennings on the album Lonesome, On'ry and Mean

 

1973 Chet Atkins on the album Alone

 

1973 Thelma Houston on Thelma Houston

 

1973 Olivia Newton-John on the album Let Me Be There

 

1974 Cornelis Vreeswijk on the album Getinghonung (Swedish

lyrics: Jag och Bosse Lidén)

 

1975 Lonnie Donegan

 

1979 Gianna Nannini (Io e Bobby McGee) on the album California

 

1984 Joan Baez included a live version of the song on her Live Europe '83 album; Baez also performed the song with the Boston Pops in 1985.

 

1994 Blind Melon records the song in the studio during a session in The Netherlands, appears on their B-sides collection.

 

1994 Melissa Etheridge on the album Acoustic

 

1997 Loquillo on the album Compañeros de viaje

 

1999 LeAnn Rimes on the album LeAnn Rimes

 

1999 Barb Jungr on the album Bare

 

2002 Anne Murray on the album Country Croonin'

 

2002 Jennifer Love Hewitt on the album Bare Naked

 

2002 Waterloo & Robinson (Ich und BobbyMcGee) on the album Marianne

 

2003 Jerry Jeff Walker on the album Too Old To Change

 

2004 Pink on the album Live in Europe

 

2005 Allison Crowe on the double-album Live at Wood Hall

 

2005 Dolly Parton on the album Those Were The Days

 

2005 Arlo Guthrie on the album Live In Sydney

 

2005 Tori Amos live in Hartford 4 Oct 2005

 

2007 Angela Kalule on the soundtrack of The Last King of Scotland

 

2007 Caroline af Ugglas on the album Joplin på Svenska

 

2008 Amanda Strydom on the album kerse teen die donker

 

2010 Crystal Bowersox on American Idol iTunes release of studio version from Top 11 week, and Final 2 week, of season 9

 

2013 Grace Askew recorded a studio version on the fourth season of The Voice USA after defeating Trevor Davis in the Battle Round performing the same song.

 

Other artists:

 

Amanda Overmyer

 

Joan Baez

 

Arlo Guthrie

 

Loretta Lynn

 

Willie Nelson

 

Dave Dudley

 

The Statler Brothers

 

Aaron Lewis

 

John Doe (Listen)

 

Charley Pride

 

Taylor Horn

 

Kenny Rogers

 

Brian McKnight

 

Celinda Pink

 

The Platters

 

Impotent Sea Snakes

 

Bobbie Gentry

 

Buck Owens

 

Roy Clark

 

Hank Snow

 

Lee Conway

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there are a ton of songs written in the 60's that have been covered to death in the last 40 years.

 

I was thinking more along the lines of stuff like "Just a Gigolo", of which the most famous version (in this case, David Lee Roth's rendition) was just one on top of a huge pile of pre-existing performances.

 

That song dates all the way back to the 20's, and while Roth's version was truest to the original, he also drew a great deal of melodic inspiration from the Village People's stab at it, for example.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, let's not stop there...

 

"Mack The Knife" goes WAY back before Bobby Darin ever got ahold of it.

 

Every old timer here who's "cut his teeth" on folk music knows "Wildwood Flower" has long been in the "public domain"

 

Same with "Man of Constant Sorrow". Dylan did a version on HIS debut album, LONG before "O Brother, Where Art Thou" brought attention to it again!( There's a guy in that movie playing a guy named "Tommy" who's an actual blues singer/guitarist whose name I've never learned!

I already mentioned "Tobacco Road", which was written and first recorded by John D. Loudermilk, and as we know, also done by The Nashvile Teens, Edgar Winter and White Trash. But also done by Lou Rawls, and even The JEFFERSON AIRPLANE, and last count, by nearly 200 other artists on three other continents! There's even legend that The Jackson Five recorded a demo of it for an audition of some kind, but the tape is long gone...

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ Fang, according to Wiki, long before Dylan did a version Man of Constant Sorrow was 1st recorded by Dick Burnett and dates back to his song book in 1913. It was an old folk song known as Farewell Song. It was also recorded in 1928 by Emry Arthur...

It's right up there as a hit tune like House and Hey Joe and is another great example of old folk songs making it big again...

 

@ P90, I love researching and bringing back old songs. For a pattern comparison, try doing House of the Rising Sun and then do Little Red Riding Hood by Sam The Sham using the same chords LOL!

 

@ Scott, :2thu:

 

@ DBM, Try Am C D F Am C E, Am C D F Am E Am or better yet,

Em G A C Em G B7, Em G A C Em B7 Em

the Em key really works for my baritone voice and gets me more in tune with the older folkie version...everyone I know plays it in Am though LOL!

 

@ Caevan, I would say Kris Kristopherson's version is the real thing as he wrote Me and Bobby McGee with Fred Foster...it's a great song. I know he gave or sold the song away and it was recorded a year before he did his version by Roger Miller. A similar fate for:

Willie Nelson who wrote Crazy recorded by Patsy Cline

Merle Travis who wrote 16 Tons recorded by Tennessee Earnie Ford

and Bobby Troup who wrote Route 66, 1st recorded by Nat King Cole...You know these guys have kicked themselves in the ass for a long time, but they still laugh all the way to the bank LOL!

 

@ Griff, Just a Gigolo is a cool song and one of my favorites by David Lee Roth. According to Wiki it dates back to 1924. Like P90 researching old songs, some tunes I do in addition to House from 1934 and before, would be Summertime 1932 and Scotch and Soda 1932. Now I'll have to start working on being a Gigolo LOL!

 

ps.

<---here's Satchmo's version, he doesn't sing until about half way through..

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hands-down, the very finest and definitive, tour de force examples of "Mack The Knife" ever performed were laid down by Louis Armstrong. No argument will be tolerated. :smirk:

 

...the Village People's stab at it, for example.

 

:freak::laugh::D:thu:

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ DBM, Try Am C D F Am C E, Am C D F Am E Am or better yet,

Em G A C Em G B7, Em G A C Em B7 Em

the Em key really works for my baritone voice and gets me more in tune with the older folkie version...everyone I know plays it in Am though LOL!

 

I think I played it in Am back in the day. When I sang A-Capella in the background, I did the baritone harmony part, so I am sure you are correct, the EM would do better, as I write a lot of my stuff in the keys of EMaj and Emin.

 

Thanks....... I saved the suggestion on the changes to a text file. I may just do an electrified version for my covers CD which I have partially finished.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me know how it comes out DBM in Eminor...the lower range really helped me keep from straining my voice and it inspired me to come up with some new vocal interpretations of the song (a little more bluesy!) :cool:
Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hands-down, the very finest and definitive, tour de force examples of "Mack The Knife" ever performed were laid down by Louis Armstrong. No argument will be tolerated. :smirk:

 

...the Village People's stab at it, for example.

 

<--- +1... :cool:

 

 

 

:freak::laugh::D:thu:

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hands-down, the very finest and definitive, tour de force examples of "Mack The Knife" ever performed were laid down by Louis Armstrong. No argument will be tolerated. :smirk:

 

...the Village People's stab at it, for example.

 

:freak::laugh::D:thu:

 

<--- +1... :cool:

 

Much agreed.

 

Say, I wonder- whatever became of Mac, and Joe? Did they meet? Punch each others' dance-cards, put out both their lights... ?

 

:idk :crazy::laugh::D

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe they were both done in by "Hard Hearted Hannah"! :D

Whitefang

@ Caevan, My money's on Joe... "never take a knife to a gun fight" LOL! :cool:

 

Yeah, but Joe was an impulsive murderer on the run, while our boy Mack was a stone pro...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...