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Precision Bass Pickups


rimmry

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Well, it all depends on what kind of sound you're going for. Different pickups are going to yield different tones. And it's also worth asking about the bass that you're considering for this pickup swap. Is there something about the tone of that bass that isn't doing it for you?

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"My concern is, and I have to, uh, check with my accountant, that this might bump me into a higher, uh, tax..."

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No, the bass is fine. Just trying to achieve a different sound. About the sound I want to get, I usually play Alternative Rock/ Punk Rock/ Metal with my bands, but also do allot of funky soloing and complex speed playing on my own (solo shows). So i'm guessing I want a punchy, mid rangy and bright tone.
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If it ain't broken don't fix it.

You can get a lot of different sounds by altering your playing and adjusting the knobs. Unless you are totally disappointed, leave it alone. Many people have changed their pickups only to say either it didn't make a difference or "What happened to my sound? My life is over. I will resign myself to dying kittens muted grey for the rest of my existence!!!"

 

Even if you radically change your tone and are totally satisfied by the change, only you and maybe one other person in the world that is not a bass player will notice.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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You may want to consider swapping the Precision for a Jazz or other two pickup bass. "Bright" is not ordinarily a sound associated with Precision basses.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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I'd experiment with different caps before PUs. Something as simple as a cap change can totally revoice the sound coming from the bass.

Fwiw, my P bass has an "unusual" cap, and it's pretty bright.

Ya know, for a P bass. ;)

 

Cheaper than PUs too.

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound P pickup is definitely one of the more brash sounding Precision pickups. I've also heard some good things about Fender's '58 Precision pickup, too. That is, if you're going for something a little more agro from a P-Bass pickup.

 

When I did my own P-Bass build? I went with the Seymour Duncan Antiquity II Precision pickup. That's got more of a deep and beefy tone, though. And I suspect that may not be quite the direction you want to go in.

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"Punchy, mid-rangey and bright" indeed sounds like a Quarter Pounder might be worth investigating.

However (beating a dead horse deader), you could get a handful of caps, all different, for well under 20 bucks. Each would likely have a different sound, each would be easily replaced for a "pick your flavor" approach, and all are reversible someday if you need to sell, easy to go back to stock.

 

Assuming you can/would solder competently, many hours of fun lay ahead...

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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A little twiddlin' with the knobs on the amp can do wonders as well. If your band members are scooping all the mids out of their sound, you may want to dial in yours to fill that void which may give you the punch you need.

 

Lower value caps may give you a little more control if your tone knob is set between 7-9, at 10 the cap is disengaged. Myself personally, I went the other direction, I like playing in the mud but after a certain value higher it seemed like there's a point where it's all or nothing.

 

If you do change the pickup, try not to destroy it or cut the wires too short so it can be used again and maybe included if you ever sell the thing.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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"Caps"? Huh? I should probably know what this is, but I am not ashamed to parade my ignorance for all the world to see.

 

So there.

 

Capacitor. Your tone pot is just a variable resistor and a capacitor, making a low-pass filter (meaning it filters out the high frequencies). When you turn the pot, you adjust the frequency above which, frequencies are filtered (at a rate of 6dB per octave above the cutoff frequency).

 

And no, that's not like the Flux Capacitor, which is what makes time travel possible.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I'd experiment with different caps before PUs. Something as simple as a cap change can totally revoice the sound coming from the bass.

Fwiw, my P bass has an "unusual" cap, and it's pretty bright.

Ya know, for a P bass. ;)

 

Cheaper than PUs too.

 

Hmmm... OK...

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I'd experiment with different caps before PUs. Something as simple as a cap change can totally revoice the sound coming from the bass.

Fwiw, my P bass has an "unusual" cap, and it's pretty bright.

Ya know, for a P bass. ;)

 

Cheaper than PUs too.

And what cap do you have mate?

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I agree that you might want to mess with amp settings, hand placement, speaker cabs, etc. as well. Many options await you...

 

 

The P bass capacitor for "vintage" wiring is usually either a .047µF or 0.1µF, while the "modern" voicing is typically a .05µF. A "brighter, punchier" cap value, for one, is .033µF.

 

The cap in mine is .02µF. It supposedly takes off the top end and leaves the upper mids, which is good because this bass is plenty bright already.

 

Interesting article on this here:

Seymour Duncan page

 

Much more technical info here:

Capacitor info page

 

And a Wikipedia page on farads and caps

wikipedia farad page:

 

Happy reading!

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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before you mod your instrument you might want to try EQ settings. one trick that helps a bass sound bright is to cut the low mids -- the "body" of the sound. think like a mid-scoop, but narrow and centered lower in the frequency range. this is easier with a graphic or parametric EQ. you won't be able to get the EQ i'm describing with a simple 3-band EQ.
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I like my SPB-3 pick ups in my 69 p bass, overall a great pick up for the music you are playing. Just go for it, never look back.

 

Lok

1997 PRS CE24, 1981 Greco MSV 850, 1991 Greco V 900, 2 2006 Dean Inferno Flying Vs, 1987 Gibson Flying V, 2000s Jackson Dinky/Soloist, 1992 Gibson Les Paul Studio,

 

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Even if you radically change your tone and are totally satisfied by the change, only you and maybe one other person in the world that is not a bass player will notice.

 

Sounds pretty reasonable to me. In fact, most bass players won't notice either.

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