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Greenwitch Village The Music That Defined A Generation


desertbluesman

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I watched Greenwitch Village The Music That Defined A Generation on Netflix a few nights ago. It was basically a history of the folk scene that exploded in Greenwitch Village in the early 60's.

 

Quite interesting, considering the debate we had here a few weeks back. It went from pre 60's folkies like Woody Guthrie, to Pete Seegar and the Weavers, to Pete Seegar, and then the new groups/individuals including Dylan, Phil Ochs, Peter Paul and Mary, Buffy St Marie, Joni Mitchell, Judy Collins, Odetta, and quite a lot of folks I never heard of or had forgotten existed.

 

I remember the days very well and the show actually had me revisit the times for a few hours. I was very impressed with the completeness of the film and how well documented it was. I highly recommend it (that is if you subscribe to Netflix which is where I came across it).

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I remember the days, though I was only 10 years old in 1963 - mostly from the radio. Later on I heard the songs and appreciated them from a more mature perspective.

Yes, I remember "hootennanies" and all that, LOL.

I like the coffeehouse sense of humor, which I first heard as a kid.

Some of those "folk singers" were quite talented.

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I'm not a fan of folk so I'll pass. I do appreciate what was done in the genre and thought a lot of Dylan and Guthrie, I also like Peter Paul and Mary and The Kingston Trio.

 

I was also a Donovan fan as folk was petering out and preferred Dylan, when he went electric. I also liked what The Mamas and Poppas came up with later along with The Fifth Dimension, Simon and Garfunkle, Carole King, James Taylor and Jim Croce (to name a few that we discussed in the prior folkie thread). Even though these artists were not really folk IMHO, I liked their music much better than the folk of my early days. Like Eric, I was 13 in 1963, but I was more into Elvis, Beach Boys, Rolling Stones and The Beatles during that period and later in 68 I was more into CCR...then came Cream, Steppenwolf, etc. So Folk music was more of a lost art for me. :cool:

 

In 1969 one of my buddies (I grew up with playing guitar & still do as we get together playing our old Venture music from our 1965 - 1968 High School Dayz), and I visited Greenwitch Village at the Bleaker Street Bar, as I was in search of the perfect Zombie... :crazy:

Take care, Larryz
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From what I understand about Greenwich Village back then, if you WENT there back then, you'd have seen a STREETfull of "zombies" :D

 

My daughter subscribes to Netflix, and often "burns" certain movies for me( and of course, herself), I might ask HER to "cache" it and burn me a copy. Sounds like my kind of stuff, DBM. Thanks for the tip.

 

I HAD heard of the doc, but have failed in other venues to ever see it. I also wonder if there's a soundtrack available?

 

I too, remember the events, AND also the TV SHOW "Hootenanny" and hootenannies as well.

 

And how many remember that actor THEODORE BIKEL was ALSO considered a "folk singer", and ever also saw HIM on "Hootenanny"? (Some might recall BIKEL played the sheriff

that was chasing TONY CURTIS and SIDNEY POITIER all through "The Defiant Ones"....or was the crackpot in the "Twighlight Zone" episode who wound up shrinking down to TWO INCHES TALL at the end?) Good actor. Also a good player AND singer!

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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From what I understand about Greenwich Village back then, if you WENT there back then, you'd have seen a STREETfull of "zombies" :D

 

That is what happens for me whenever I visit any city. (says transplanted Philly to country boy with big grin on face)

 

 

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What I did not know was Momma Cass was in a real folk band before Mommas and Poppas. The thing is; there was only part performances, it was more of a "this is what happened in those days" than complete performances. Lots of the old folks talking about how it came about and the feelings in the air at the time. It was a good watch truthfully, and I really liked much of the stuff as done by those folks as it was coming out.

 

I lived on a resort Island 90 miles south of NYC, and quite a few New Yorkers showed up between Labor and Memorial days for the summer, and a lot of that Village stuff drifted down with those "shoobees" (which is what we locals called the tourists or summer visitors). Those transplants included some of those folks at the local venues, and as summer residents and of course there was lots of acoustic music going on in the hang outs and private homes. And there were all kinds of musical jams all over the place in the warm months.

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Yes, Washington Square Park was famous for its jam sessions.

And people STILL play there sometimes, with their bands or just dragging their instruments to play with whoever's there who's in the mood. I've been known to do it my own self, since I live in Queens and it's not that long to get there on the subway.

Still plenty of live music in NYC, but I don't think it's as vibrant scene as back then; but I don't get out enough to know that for SURE..... LOL

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@DBM:

 

The MAMAS and THE POPPAS WERE once a folk group known as THE MUGWUMPS (well, MOST of them, at ONE time or another) along with JOHN SEBASTIAN and ZAL, that oddball guitarist from The Lovin' Spoonful who played that THUNDERBIRD that looked so COOL to us back in the late '60's! I think ROGER MCGUINN and BARRY MCGUIRE were in there at one point, too.

 

I think( but not really sure) that the only member of The Mamas and The Poppas that WASN'T a Mugwump, was MICHELLE PHILIPS.

 

Anyway, they mentioned it all in their song, CREEQUE ALLEY

Whitefang

 

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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@Whitefang. I googled it and this comes from wikipedia, I was thinking the group Cass was in on that show was not anyone I recognized.

 

While working as a cloakroom attendant at The Showplace in Greenwich Village in New York, Elliot would sometimes sing, but it wasn't until she returned to the Washington D.C. area, to attend American University (not Swarthmore College as mentioned in the biographical song Creeque Alley) that she began to pursue a singing career. As America's folk music scene was on the rise, Elliot met banjoist and singer Tim Rose and singer John Brown, and the three began performing as The Triumvirate. In 1963, James Hendricks replaced Brown and the trio was renamed The Big 3. Elliot's first recording with The Big 3 was Winkin', Blinkin' and Nod, released by FM Records in 1963. In 1964, the group appeared on an "open mike" night at The Bitter End in Greenwich Village, billed as "Cass Elliot and the Big 3", followed onstage by folksinger Jim Fosso and bluegrass banjoist Eric Weissberg (who would become famous eight years later for performing "Dueling Banjos" on the soundtrack for Deliverance in 1972).

 

When Tim Rose left The Big 3 in 1964, Elliot and Hendricks teamed with Canadians Zal Yanovsky and Denny Doherty to form The Mugwumps. This group lasted eight months, after which Cass performed as a solo act for a while. In the meantime, Yanovsky and John Sebastian co-founded The Lovin' Spoonful, while Doherty joined The New Journeymen, a group that also included John Phillips and his wife, Michelle. In 1965, Doherty persuaded Phillips that Elliot should join the group, which she did while she and the group members were vacationing in the Virgin Islands.

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Kinda makes you wonder how they managed to keep The Mamas and The Poppas together as long as they did!

 

And don't forget---Cass was once again pursuing, and seemingly successfully too, a solo career at the time of her too soon death.

 

Seems that the only guy(whom oddly wasn't mentioned ANYwhere in any of this)who STAYED out of the "folk-Rock" fray was old Sebastian and Yanovsky pal DAVE BLOOMBERG, another fine "folkie" from those times.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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