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OT: High Q Singing


PianoMan51

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That is exactly what she is doing. She creates a high resonance filter in her mouth cavity and has the muscle control to change the frequency of that peak independently from the frequency her vocal cords are vibrating.

 

Talk about an analog filter! :thu:

Moe

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I suppose it's an acquired taste, but I think it's cool as hell.

 

I first heard Tuvan throat-singing by Kongar-ol Ondar on Jeff Lorber's "Tuva" (West Side Stories album). Ondar turned up again on one of Bela Fleck's albums. It was great to hear in those contexts, although a whole album's worth? I'd probably have a hard time connecting to it, but then I used to listen to Balinese gamalan and monkey chants. (This probably comes off more "look at how hipster I am!" than I intend...)

 

Somewhere in there I watched the "Ghengis Blues" documentary. Worth a watch.

 

Then I got Omnisphere, which among several thousand other things has some great Tuvan throat-singing samples.

 

I make software noises.
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How do they teach the monkeys to chant??

Hammond: L111, M100, M3, BC, CV, Franken CV, A100, D152, C3, B3

Leslie: 710, 760, 51C, 147, 145, 122, 22H, 31H

Yamaha: CP4, DGX-620, DX7II-FD-E!, PF85, DX9

Roland: VR-09, RD-800

 

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The young lady has some nice sine waves.

 

Here is a saw wave oscillator.

 

[video:youtube]

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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Okay, I'm going into professor mode. Forgive me...

 

I'm not even close to being a mathematician, but let me give it a shot. The Greeks were big into ratios. Hence rationality. The overtones are the frequencies of the various ratios of a string or pipe or bar that can vibrate along with the fundamental.

 

Now consider that we tune a keyboard, starting with C, tuning up a perfect (perfect because you can perfectly tune it using your ears to hear the zero beat point) 5th to get to G. Then tune up another perfect 5th to get to D, and so on until we get back to C. Unfortunately, from the point of view of the Pythagoreans, the C that we started with doesn't equal the C we end up with. The difference between the starting C and the ending C is the musical comma, about a quarter-tone. God, the rational, gets really complicated. And that is why we play on equal tempered instruments, to adjust for the comma.

 

Pop quiz next week!

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Okay, I'm going into professor mode. Forgive me...

 

I'm not even close to being a mathematician, but let me give it a shot. The Greeks were big into ratios. Hence rationality. The overtones are the frequencies of the various ratios of a string or pipe or bar that can vibrate along with the fundamental.

 

Now consider that we tune a keyboard, starting with C, tuning up a perfect (perfect because you can perfectly tune it using your ears to hear the zero beat point) 5th to get to G. Then tune up another perfect 5th to get to D, and so on until we get back to C. Unfortunately, from the point of view of the Pythagoreans, the C that we started with doesn't equal the C we end up with. The difference between the starting C and the ending C is the musical comma, about a quarter-tone. God, the rational, gets really complicated. And that is why we play on equal tempered instruments, to adjust for the comma.

 

Pop quiz next week!

 

That is almost right, but not quite. The interval of fifths is the frequency ratio of 3/2. Going op in fifths (total of 12), as you described, gives (3/2)^12. But in the way we want to "divide" the tones in the system, this should be the same as going up 7 octaves. Octaves have a ratio of 2, so this would be 2^7. But this does not equal (3/2)^12. That difference is the Pythagorean comma.

 

BTW, it is cool a thing, but I won't call it polyphonic singing. The tones are much too related to be called polyphonic in my opinion.

Rudy

 

 

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Yup - in a nutshell, 7 octaves is slightly different to 12 "perfect" (harmonic) fifths - the difference is the comma.

 

I'm good on background harmonies but a high Q is way out of my range.

 

+1!

 

Reminds me of a comedian who did a routine with a guitar. He did a little song with a classic sequence at the end:

I

I7 first inversion

IV

#IVdim (etc)

And took that dim chord 3 semitones higher repeatedly. Got to somewhere around the 14th fret of his guitar, looked surprised and announced "that was P!"

 

Cheers, Mike.

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In overtone singing, it's the syntonic comma that is the one that makes the tuning more different from Equal Temperament than the Pythagorean comma. The syntonic comma is simply the difference between going up 4 fifths (C, G, D, A, E) and going up a major third (C - E). Up 4 fifths is 408 cents, while a pure major third (5/4) is 386 cents.

 

Pythagorean comma is roughly 23.5 cents, while the syntonic comma is roughly 21.5 cents.

 

But it's all a moot point when you're singing unaccompanied...

 

Stephen

 

 

 

 

.

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The first video...there's a spot at 3:38 that reminds of a 70s prog rock song or something...maybe by Kansas. Anybody know what I'm talking about?

 

As for the Siberian couple. The girl needs a high-pass filter at about 400Hz.

Hammond: L111, M100, M3, BC, CV, Franken CV, A100, D152, C3, B3

Leslie: 710, 760, 51C, 147, 145, 122, 22H, 31H

Yamaha: CP4, DGX-620, DX7II-FD-E!, PF85, DX9

Roland: VR-09, RD-800

 

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