Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Another post about the CP4


16251

Recommended Posts

The Yamaha CP4 has been discussed ad nauseam, but after playing Roland FP4 for many years and then deciding that the NP2 was the next board for me, only to realize that I couldn't connect with it's sounds (no disrespect to people who use and love Nord products.) I ended up buying a CP4.

 

I've been playing the CP4 at home now more than a week and what strikes me is how wonderful the action is. This is the first DP I've owned that I could use as my only piano. It feels dense and the sounds react like it's mechanical. I still love my AG/N2, but if times were tough, I feel I could sell it knowing I would still had a viable instrument.

 

The acoustic pianos on the Nord IMO all sounded the same, but with the CP4, I feel I have three usable samples that have their strengths and weaknesses, but at least I hear the difference.

 

The Rhodes sounds are the best I've ever played. Great dynamic range and can be spanked, only if you want. I've owned previous Yamahas and those reached highest velocity without much pressure, which made them difficult to control. I'm also jazzed that there are many different sound pallets to choose from and my favorite feature, the stereo vibrato kills the Nord's version of this effect. I can't add new effects as easy as Nord, but there is a nice feature called effect buttons, which allows you to add, remove, tweak, or change an effect without having to go into multiple windows.

 

I still have to master all the performance features, but so far I'm full of positive GAS.

 

Some of you who have read my posts, know I bought a Lucas Nano 300. That turned out to be a bust. Didn't sound good with either Nord or Yamaha. (Don't feel bad - bought for $450; sold for $500.) My 20+ year old GK keyboard amps sound very good. I'm playing only jazz gigs that pay sh*t, so spending big bucks for 1000 watt powered speakers with 8/10" speakers is not on radar/GAS yet. I'm old school and prefer 12" speakers, but those cabs are too big. The GK have to be the smallest footprint for a 12" speaker.

 

I can't wait to play out tonight first time with CP4!

AvantGrand N2 | ES520 | Gallien-Krueger MK & MP | https://soundcloud.com/pete36251

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 82
  • Created
  • Last Reply
I was impressed by the CP4 action and the presence of the Piano 1 when I did a side by side with the Roland RD800. To my surprise I much preferred the CP4.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm headed out to Huntington hospital in Pasadena in about a half hour for my hernia surgery, but wanted to do a quick copy & paste from yesterday's post on PW.

 

"I just spent my first half hour comparing the NP2 and CP4. Listening with my RCF TT08As on speaker stands going through my APB Dyna Sonics ProSpec 2U6M2S mixer.

 

Initial thoughts - Wow NO comparison ! The CP4 is so much richer and easier to be expressive on , especially for jazz. The Yamaha inspires you (or me) to play, where the Nord makes me wanna go and take a nap. :laugh:

 

Even my wife said, yes the CP4 sounds richer, fuller and more like a piano. She did say she could see how the Nord would sound good out front in the audience. I said ..yeah, that's were they get ya. ;)

 

She added...you've been unhappy with that Nord for 3 years now. Get what inspires you to play your best in spite of what it sounds like out front.

 

I said right, it should be more about me - Al Franken. :D

 

More thoughts to come when I get some more time to spend on the CP4".

 

To add, the only negative I've found is that when I use my K&M 18880 stand, because there's a slight lip underneath the CP4, it makes it sit about a 1/2- 3/4 of an inch too high. I had this issue with the CP300. I pulled out my Quik-Lok WS-550 from the attic and it's the right sitting height on that...except after using the sleek K&M with the Nord the past 2 years, the 550 looks kinda ugly to me. So need to find another stand. Someone on PW mentioned the K&M Omega goes to the same height at its lowest setting, so maybe one of the other table stands from K&M goes lower.

 

But yeah, really digging it. It sounds even better when I ran though my JMK Audio JM-110 di/pre. More clarity. And again, night & day difference from playing the Nord.

 

Other drag is- I'll probably be under Doc's orders not to lift anything for awhile, so already had to cancel two gigs next week I was planning on using it on. :(

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

 

NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday, due to work being done at the house, it was easier for me to practice using the CP4 (vs. my Kawai acoustic), and I was reminded again how much I enjoy playing it.

For me, the CP4 is the smoothest transition between a digital and acoustic piano. For practicing and stage it's very transparent in that it doesn't get in the way, or exaggerate the pianistic elements. It simply does a great job of emulating three, well mic'd acoustic grands. And if I need to alter those tones to fit a particular 'sound', there are several solid editing tools to do so.

 

Also the Rhodes tones are stellar, and uber-playable; Wurli's are just about as good. The rest is a capable mix of Motif X_ ROMpler tones, but with some effect and basic, patch editing I've been able to get some very gig-worthy sounds: the usual pop brass/saxes, strings, pads, synth comps/leads, guitars; the not-so-usual - and surprisingly good - bagpipes, accordions, harmonicas, and an electric violin that seems a little stronger than the original, Motif XS Voice. I worked some on the Hammond tones, but they're just passable for cover gigging. Still, this machine could do a first class job on single keyboard gig.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd add this: that the CP4/40 are the best sounding DPs I've come across in mono. No phasey crap, no ridiculously compressed sound. The other day I accidentally dialled up my tweaked gigging mono CF sound in the studio and happily improvised for about half an hour before I realised I wasn't using the stereo patch.

Yamaha P515 | Yamaha CP4 | Yamaha MODX 8 | Casio PX S1000 | Nord Electro 5D | Moog Sub 37 | Korg Monologue | Native Instruments Maschine MK3 | Novation Circuit Tracks | Plug-ins Agogo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wondering about the motif sounds on the CP4..... Are they watered down versions? It seems to be marketed as a stage piano covering all the usual based, acoustic piano, elec piano clav etc with a few bonus Motif sounds thrown in. Don't have access to one in Ireland and am keen to try it out but curious about the quality of the other bread and butter sounds on the board.
Yamaha MODX8, Legend Live.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They're useable but emphatically not as impressive as the Motif sounds. Obviously there's a lack of after touch but there doesn't seem to be much of the 'super articulation' present in the Motif voices which really boosts their realism.

Yamaha P515 | Yamaha CP4 | Yamaha MODX 8 | Casio PX S1000 | Nord Electro 5D | Moog Sub 37 | Korg Monologue | Native Instruments Maschine MK3 | Novation Circuit Tracks | Plug-ins Agogo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Overall the bread and butter sounds are usable, and will get you through a single keyboard gig just fine. With a little programming, many of the factory sounds can become higher caliber patches; and, the editing learning curve is much simpler than the Motif X_.

I wouldn't consider the additional, Motif-based sounds as 'watered down'; the core ROMpler technology is identical for that portion of the instrument. But, as Aidan pointed out, they aren't quite as impressive. This is likely due to the detailing 'limits' in place, programming-wise; there just aren't quite as many fine-design tools in the box. Still I've managed to coax some Motif XS grade alternate sounds out of the CP4.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, this is the happiest I've been with DP . . . the most enjoyable to play. I like the RD800 just as much, maybe a wee bit more, but the weight is a big step up from the CP4.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a Yamaha grand in my workplace (a radio station) and the CP4 is the closest digital to it in terms of action.

 

My technique has never been better since I began practising in earnest on the CP4 about a two months ago...I find the transition from the digital to acoustic the least jarring of all the dp's I've owned so far.

 

The weight is also a real boon. I was searching for a piano that could double for home and stage use and this is it.

 

The additional sounds are very useable to me...standard ROMpler fare, comparable to the Korg M50 which I also use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the OP ...previous Yamaha Rhodes patches barked way too fast for me ( ala Motif). It's good to hear they have changed that.

 

I haven't hopped on the CP4 train quite yet. I am still somewhat satisfied with the Roland RD300 GX Superior Grand sample - similar to the Roland FP4.

 

There were some tones in the CFX sample ( lower bass notes)that I was a little unsure about. It kind of reminded me of what was happening with the S90XS. But I haven't spent enough time to be absolutely sure about this, so please CP4 users, don't be alarmed.

 

What I really liked about the CP4 was the sonic clarity. By the way, this was one of the strong points of the CP33 also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm another disgruntled Nord (Piano 88) user who just got a CP4. As much as I loved the look, feel, and solid construction of the Nord, I could never, despite endless tweaking, get an AP sound out of it that I liked. As a jazz player, I'm all about the AP, almost exclusively.

 

I'm liking the CP4 much more than the Nord. Through my paired EV ZXA1's, the APs on the CP4 sound really good. My all-time favorite digital AP sound still comes from my GEM Promega 3, which stays at home because it's just too damn heavy for gigging. I also might like the APs on my Roland RD-800SX a bit more than those on the CP4, but that stays in the dance studio where I work because it, too, is too heavy to gig.

 

I agree with those who've admired the keyboard feel on the CP4. Unlike other Yammy's I've owned and played in the past, this one is not too heavy and not to light. Deliciously playable.

 

I'm happy using untweaked presets right out of the box, so I haven't dug deeply into

the hidden guts of the machine. I like having the 4 band equalizer right there on the dashboard. I'm annoyed that the locations of the back panel controls and inputs/outputs aren't labeled on the dash. The plastic box that houses the thing feels cheesy but looks good.

 

I bought mine from a dealer on Ebay as an open box unit, thus saving about $500 on what seems to be the current street price to a brand new one. I'd have to say that, even at the reduced price I paid for it, the thing seems overpriced by a few hundred dollars (although, compared to the insane pricing on Nord products, it's a tremendous bargain). I'm wishing it came, like the Nord, with all the silly stuff stripped away -- like all those synthy sounds and cheesy pads and GM percussion sets and effects that most people probably never use. I'm glad I didn't pay full price for it.

 

Overall, I think this is going to work for me. Still, I wish that GEM was still in business, making a lighter version of the Promega, or that the RD800 weighed about 10 pounds less and was priced around what I paid for the CP4.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't tried a CP4, but I did have a CP5 for quite a while. It played and sounded great when I was on my own, but as part of an electric band it would get washed out by the other instruments.

 

I tried all sorts of things: EQ, compression, better amplification, etc. -- nothing worked well. When I switched to the Nord Piano 2, no such problem any more.

 

My opinion would be that the piano voices don't have the textured richness of the CP5 that you could hear in a solo situation, but it had all the punch I needed to be clearly heard in a band setting. And I do like the fact that I've got all sorts of piano samples to fool around with. I also like the string resonance on some of the pieces I play.

 

Since I have real acoustic pianos to bang on at home, the CP5 ended up having no real role -- and it was gawd-awful heavy -- so I sold it to a singer/songwriter lady who tells me she still loves it.

 

So, here's the question: any of you CP4 lovers care to comment on how well it does as part of an electric blues band or similar? Do the APs and EPs have the balls to cut through the din?

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They have a CP4 and RD800 side-by-side at the local GC but I was in a rush and didn't have time to ask for headphones (they weren't hooked up for sound). I'm hoping to get that chance in a half hour on the way to a gig today.

 

When playing silently, the RD800 keybed (there, it happened again; the forum editing tool removed the "b" so I had to re-force it!) felt 10x better to me, in terms of overall feel and bounce, but even without sound I got the impression its escapement isn't as fast as the CP4's. That will be the main thing I compare today; I'll use this to drive Pianoteq so the sound is less important to me (I hope to buy an acoustic upright soon).

Eugenio Upright, 60th P-Bass, Geddy Lee J-Bass, Hofner HCT-500/7, Yamaha BBP35, Viking Bari

Select Strat, Select Tele, Am Pro JM, LP 57 Gold, G5422DC-12, T486, ES295, PM2, EXL1

XK1c, Voyager, Prophet XL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is the CP4 better than the CP5 action and AP sound?

 

I've had the CP4 for a little over a week now and have been playing it everyday in my studio. Due to this hernia thing , it'll be awhile before I can make some comments on how it works live.

 

But continued thoughts on just playing it in the studio - I play the new CFX sample all the time , I can't see anything being better (at this point in time) for a jazz player then this. It gives you all of what you need for straight ahead acoustic contexts.

 

I've often posted on how the CP5 CF Grand sample would wash out in some less then favorable acoustical rooms. Also with drummers that didn't have good technique -they tended to play loud or their drums sounded harsh or were tuned crappy. And acoustic bass players that got more of a "electric" tone as opposed to an "acoustic" sound out of their amps. Under these conditions, the CP5 didn't fare all that well. The Nord Piano 2/88 definitely works better, sonically, when all these negative things are stacked against you..

 

But when the Jazz Gods were smiling down upon me and everything was in its place (which wasn't often enough) , the CP5 held up under the most critical of listening conditions.

 

I like 'em both and wouldn't hesitate to use either for a*concert* context when an acoustic wasn't available.

 

The Nord is still great too, but imo doesn't give the serious jazz player what he/she needs in respect to sound and action. I still think for a rock/pop person, where the pianistic and technical demands are less, the sound of the Nord is tough to beat.

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

 

NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a RD800 and a CP4 side by side and I soloed a couple of fast right hand choruses of Giant Steps on each. I quickly noticed the RD-800 action was holding me back. It had higher inertia and thus I had to work harder. That is not what a jazz player wants. It was more effortless on the CP4.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks; that's what I figured. I didn't get a chance to try the RD-800 today as someone had bought it in the past few days. They'll probably get one in again soon.

 

I like the CP-4 every time I try it, but am trying to find an equivalent or better match amongst the other offerings outside the CP-range (the ones with built-in pedals; not all of them are Clavinovas anymore).

Eugenio Upright, 60th P-Bass, Geddy Lee J-Bass, Hofner HCT-500/7, Yamaha BBP35, Viking Bari

Select Strat, Select Tele, Am Pro JM, LP 57 Gold, G5422DC-12, T486, ES295, PM2, EXL1

XK1c, Voyager, Prophet XL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks; that's what I figured. I didn't get a chance to try the RD-800 today as someone had bought it in the past few days. They'll probably get one in again soon.

 

I like the CP-4 every time I try it, but am trying to find an equivalent or better match amongst the other offerings outside the CP-range (the ones with built-in pedals; not all of them are Clavinovas anymore).

 

FWIW, I found the exact opposite. I tried to like the action on the CP4, but it consistently felt gluey and odd every time I tried it. I feel like it takes way too much effort and I'm fighting it.

 

By comparison, the action on the RD800 feels far more amenable to playing... anything. Much easier. Not a struggle. No Elmers Glue slathered secretly beneath the keybed.

 

For me, the action is the most important thing, so I went with the RD800.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Im not sure what to make of the "gluey" feel of the CP4. I find both RD800 and CP4 both very nice action and somewhat similar is response. I agree with Jazz+ and find the CP4 a bit easier to play fast repetitions. I like and prefer the feel of the RD800 keys a bit better. For fast jazz lines and maybe EPs I think CP4 would be the choice, but not a deal breaker for RD800 by any means. Hopefully you can try a RD800 again if Roland can get it back out there. Ridiculous and a shame how long it has been to address the XLR issue.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Gluey" means sticky and that is a false description of the CP-4 action.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been trying to find a CP4 to play locally without any luck.

 

I did play an RD800 yesterday. How does the weight of the CP4 action compare to the RD800? And particularly, because of my poly-arthritis, how hard do the CP4 keys bottom out?

 

I can play for long periods on my PC3x, but couldn't play for more than about 10 minutes on the RD300SX before the pain set in. I only got about 20 minutes on the RD800 yesterday, but didn't have any problems.

 

DigitalFakeBook Free chord/lyric display software for windows.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...