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How do YOU organize your patches for live playing?


Jetrocker

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I'm setting up 2 new keyboards for use with my band, eventually replacing and selling the older ones I currently use. In a way, it's an opportunity to "start over" in setting up a more efficent list of sounds to jump to during a live performance. I'm thinking that instead of just remembering location numbers or putting groups of sounds together (like all the organs in the first 20 slots), that maybe it makes sense to have a slot for each tune we do..even if 5 songs use the same sound(s). This is easier with the "favorites" features as well. Just wondering what you all are doing that works well for you and if you have any tips or tricks? Thanks!
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What are your boards? I guess what I really mean is -- Do you use Yamaha?

 

I just stick patches in the first available memory location on my boards either - peformance setups, voice locations or Multis. Does not matter where.

 

I use Master Mode on the Yamaha to organize all my gig sounds in setlist order. Sometime they are Multi setup using internal and external MIDI sound, Maybe a single voice, maybe an internal performance setup. Honey Badger Don't Care.

 

Pretty slick if you use the S90XS as you controller. MOTIF, MOX, MOXF ect... may do the same thing I don't know.

 

This is where YoMammaHa rocks.

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I use the Kurz PC3 and use both setups as well as programs. The PC3 has a mode called Quick Access and you can put up to 10 program/setups in an individual QA bank. So my top 10 programs/ setups are in one bank staring me in the face all night. The next 10 are in the next bank (one click away). Without QA mode, I would be frustrated with the PC3; with QA mode it's super easy.

57 Hammond B3; 69 Hammond L100P; 68 Leslie 122; Kurzweil PC3; M-Audio Code 61; Voce V5+; Neo Vent; EV ELX112P; GSI Gemini & Burn

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Yes CEB the MOXF and I belief the entire Motif-derived line offers Master mode and I agree, it makes organizing my setups for gigs easier than ever - letting you go to either a single-voice or a Performance (multi/combo/setup) from within the same mode and at the same time calling up the appropriate program on my other keyboard - all with one button-press. Beyond that, I keep collections of setups for various different bands I play in, separately (in files saved to the USB stick on my Yamaha, and on 2GB smart-cards accessed through the PCI slot on my Roland Fantom-X), and back these all up regularly to my computer where in turn all the files are backed up daily via carbonite.

Rich Forman

Yamaha MOXF8, Korg Kronos 2-61, Roland Fantom X7, Ferrofish B4000+ organ module, Roland VR-09, EV ZLX12P, K&M Spider Pro stand,

Yamaha S80, Korg Trinity Plus

 

 

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My approach is pretty simple - I create a patch for every song I learn (be it a combi or solo program voice) that I name using the song name - and stick in a user bank on my Kronos. I also create a corresponding "chart" within OnSong. I include the memory location of the patch that I use for that song. When the band leader sends out the setlist for a given gig - I duplicate that setlist in OnSong ... then scroll through the OnSong charts (which are now in "set list" order) and call up each song's patch using the memory address and hit the "add to set list" button. During the actual performance - I simply put my Kronos in Set List mode - and step thru the night's patches.

 

While it may sound like a lot of work - it's really pretty simple. I can organize a 45 song set list in about 15 minutes. Since it completely eliminates menu diving and lets me stay "in the moment" for the night - I consider it time well spent.

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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I've used different ways, depending on the capability of the keyboards I'm using.. I currently use the "setlist" function on my Kronos and it is absolutely awesome.. I have a master setlist with all of my programs and combinations, and before each gig, I take 15 minutes and create a copy of the master setlist, which I name and save based on the venue name and date, and in this setlist, I simply cut/paste/insert all of the tunes into proper sequence to correspond with the band setlist.

 

I've used Kurzweils and created Quick Access banks, and other schemes based on the functionality of my given boards, and I've even used sheets of paper with song names with the patch numbers beside it.. But I have to say that the Kronos setlist function is about the best method for organizing sets that I've ever come across.. and the setlists are simply saved on the Kronos's hard drive.. no need for any USB sticks etc.

 

Edit:

 

I should add that the setlist function of the Kronos even allows you to create a unique EQ for each setlist that corresponds to the venue you're playing (or the monitor/PA setup or whatever).. and it's easy to do this on the fly.

Craig MacDonald

Hammond BV, Franken-B (A100 in a BV cabinet), Leslies 122/147/44W, Crumar Mojo, HX3 module, Korg Kronos, VR-09, Roland GAIA, Burn, Ventilator

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I should add that the setlist function of the Kronos even allows you to create a unique EQ for each setlist that corresponds to the venue you're playing (or the monitor/PA setup or whatever).. and it's easy to do this on the fly.

 

Gotta get one! :laugh:

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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Yes CEB the MOXF and I belief the entire Motif-derived line offers Master mode and I agree, it makes organizing my setups for gigs easier than ever - letting you go to either a single-voice or a Performance (multi/combo/setup) from within the same mode and at the same time calling up the appropriate program on my other keyboard - all with one button-press.

 

That's pretty much how I do it. All of my patches are in Masters on my MOX6. We decide on the setlist a couple days before each show. I simply go into my John Melas software, and reorder the Masters. Since each master has all the patches, as well as the patch change info that's transmitted to other boards, this is all I have to do.

 

Sometimes we do change on the fly, but it's easy enough on the MOX to find the Master you need by hitting the A thru H buttons. it then tells you which patches are in that group.

 

I save all the venue specific setlist in the software, as well as a jump drive I carry with me in case of a data dump

David

Gig Rig:Roland Fantom-08| Arturia Keylab 61MK2 | MacBook Pro 14" M1| Mainstage

 

 

 

 

 

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Another tool I use, I developed myself and am kind of proud of, have described it here before but since it fits perfectly into the conversation, I think I'm okay doing it again.

 

A Windows software app I wrote that contains an XML-based database of all my keyboards, all the storage categories associated with each keyboard (like, my Roland has Patches and Performances; my Yamaha has Voices, Performances, and Master, etc), and all the songs I do, along with the setting values, for each instrument and storage-type, associated with each song. Nothing's hard-coded, the list of instruments can grow and each instrument can have any number of those storage categories. When a bandleader sends me a set list a day or two before a show, I create a Set within my own program, and then drag and drop song titles from the master list into that set. Then I specify which keyboards I will be using to play the set, and my Print function creates a pdf document showing the songs in order along with their associated patch #'s or performance #'s, or master #'s or whatever, for those songs.

 

The formatting details of the pdf are also configurable and not tightly coupled in any with the data - I can change the font sizes, colors, spacing, number of songs per page. Now, since as I mentioned earlier, I have been using the Masters on my MOXF to control everything, I only need to record and print one setting for each song these days (the Master itself will call up the appropriate Voice or Performance #, and the corresponding patch or performance on my other, Roland keyboard - well, I only use performances on that so I don't have to worry about what mode it's in.) I get a very readable accurate printed set list with patch #'s in just the minute or two it takes to drag the song titles into the set, specify the instruments, and hit Print; and I don't need to bring an Ipad or laptop to the gig (I'd be in trouble if I did need to to that because I don't have one!).

 

Rich Forman

Yamaha MOXF8, Korg Kronos 2-61, Roland Fantom X7, Ferrofish B4000+ organ module, Roland VR-09, EV ZLX12P, K&M Spider Pro stand,

Yamaha S80, Korg Trinity Plus

 

 

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Right now I do a low tech bit of writing the stage setting number next to the songs on the set list. I've only had my PX-5S for a couple of months and haven't memorized where I put all the patches. I just look one song ahead and get through my gigs fine that way. My vintage Korg I have to tweak manually but that is pretty easy.

 

For those that are using their iPad to send the changes, I would be interested in what apps they are using to do it. The idea of bringing a computer to a gig doesn't have a ton of appeal as I work one for my day job....

Korg CX-3 (vintage), Casio Privia PX-5S, Lester K, Behringer Powerplay P2, Shure 215s

http://www.hackjammers.com

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I use one setup per song on the PC3 and use QA mode so it's just a case of moving to the next setup for each song. The PC3 sends out programme change messages to the rest of the rig

Nord Stage 2EX | Nord Wave | Mainstage 3

K&M Spider Pro | JH Audio JH5 IEMs | Behringer XR18 | Radial Keylargo

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Like so many others above, I use Master Mode on my Yamaha... makes all this pretty brainless. Sounds like the Kronos has something very similar (no surprise). I don't want to have to worry about calling up the correct patch(es) for any given song. Better for me to just map it out ahead of time and then simply step from one song to the next. Master Mode makes that easy to do.
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I love the Setlist Maker app for iPad. I can import charts, make notes and setup MIDI program changes. Very slick indeed. It's nice, because you can create patch changes, add them to any song you want, then arrange your songs in a performance. You can have many performances, so it's very dynamic.
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I use the Performaces/Combis, whatever they call them. First user combi is the first song of the first set. If there's a program change within the song, then the second combi is that program change, though that's exceptionally rare. I name the combi the song name. Next combi is the next song, and so on.

 

If the board sends patch mapping, it sends the program changes to the other boards as well, but if not, other boards should have patch mapping, so if the main one doesn't, I re-map the program changes in the second one. It too gets the song name.

 

I keep an empty combi at the end of the user bank of every synth so that swapping them around as songs are added/dropped/moved is easy.

 

..Joe

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
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For the Kronos users who use the set list mode- what happens if you want to call something not on the list, like a request or maybe you have to adjust the show due to crowd response? Is it easy to get out of set list mode and to the appropriate patch quickly?

 

To keep track of patches, I use an Excel spreadsheet. Song name, patch number for each board. For the most part I have my FA08 change the patch on the SK1 so I only put that patch number in. I make the set lists for the band and create a new one each show, and print out my copy that is like the pic below, and then a "Geezer Font" version with just the song names for the rest of the band. There is also a hidden column that has the song length, and then I do a quick @sum at the bottom of the set to make sure I'm close to the set length requirement for the event.

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj60/dan88z/setlist_zpsa4fd3cbd.jpg

 

Patch 4, 1, 100, and 6 are standard sounds that get used in multiple songs- 4 is Rhodes, 1 is AP, 100 is a dual manual organ where I have the FA not playing a sound, only transmitting to the SK1, 6 is a Wurly. 10 is a horn section patch that is also used in several other songs. The others are song specific splits/layers and I name those whatever the song name is.

 

With the FA08, I put the sampler pads into numeric keypad mode, and reference the spreadsheet for the next song's patch number. It takes just a couple seconds to change to the next song. For the most part I can stage the next song by pressing it's patch number, and then at the end of the current song, press enter to change the sound.

 

I don't do anything about actual patch organization on the keyboards. It'd take way too much time to always have all the pianos in one area, EP's in another, etc. On my Yamaha I had the 1st master mode bank set for go to sounds- piano, Rhodes, Wurly, some piano/pad layers, empty patches that pointed to organs on the Nord or Hammond, strings, brass. Then the rest of the banks were all the song specific ones. The patches/performances themselves were all over as far as what numbers/banks they were, but master mode made it easy to recall them.

 

On the FA08, I created a few studio sets that were the basic sounds, pianos, EPs, etc and those are stored in the low number slots, only because I created them 1st. For the song specific studio sets, I went down my song list as I was creating them, so the order is really just how I programmed them, using the next open studio set to store the new patch.

Live: Korg Kronos 2 88, Nord Electro 5d Nord Lead A1

Toys: Roland FA08, Novation Ultranova, Moog LP, Roland SP-404SX, Roland JX10,Emu MK6

www.bksband.com

www.echoesrocks.com

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Another vote for Master mode (I have both an S70XS and an S90ES). I don't bother putting the Masters in set list order, though, because all of my bands tend to change things around a little.

I use my iPad mini to keep track of everything. For most situations, I use an Excel spreadsheet converted to PDF that lists the Master for each song -- as well as the patches on the other instruments in case a MIDI cable goes bad or whatever. I also gig from time-to-time with a Journey tribute band. For that band, I use Set List Maker and made up separate cheater cards for each tune. Eventually, I'd like to move everything over to Set List Maker -- including having it send patch changes -- but just haven't had the time to set all that up yet.

Live: Roland Jupiter-80; Yamaha S70XS (#1); Mackie 1202VLZ4, IEMs or Traynor K4

Home: Hammond SK Pro 73; Yamaha S70XS (#2); Wurlitzer 200A

Quik-Lok X stands!!!

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If I'm doing something like the contemporary Easter Cantata with the praise band, I often use the PC3's Quick Access banks to load programs and setups in the order they will be used.

This year, I just write the patch number on the chord sheets that I made up, and key in the 3 or 4 digit patch number on the keypad. It helps that I can also key in the next patch, but not press enter until I'm ready for the change.

 

Unfortunately, the PC2 doesn't have a quick mode, and must have both bank and patch number input. I hit the correct bank button, then enter the 3 digit patch number on the keypad.

 

Still, it works - and I can find somewhere in each song that one hand is free enough to punch in the next patch - plus we usually have a bit of talking (5 or 10 seconds) between songs where I can setup the next song's beginning.

 

This year, I'm providing synth patches, organ patches, and a lot of orchestral patches with right hand, plus LH bass on the PC2 on the faster songs, usually a contrasting orchestral patch on the slower ones. Our other keyboardist is providing all the regular piano (she has more to do than I).

 

Our first couple of group practices are used to finalize exactly which patch to use when. I put notes and comments on the chord sheets - different color for each board.

 

There probably is a much better way, but we do a couple of these each year. For more routine things, I just pick sounds that complement what the rest of the band is doing. A couple of years ago, the whole thing opened with a solo full pipe organ traditional bit for about 30 seconds that faded out - then a full blast modern guitar, drum, and bass song began. I had to program that little bit into the PC3 sequencer because the note spacing on the pipe organ part would have required three hands to play it live. I also pre-programmed a very fast little solo passage of tiny Christmas bells that was beyond my ability to play live.

Howard Grand|Hamm SK1-73|Kurz PC2|PC2X|PC3|PC3X|PC361; QSC K10's

HP DAW|Epi Les Paul & LP 5-str bass|iPad mini2

"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

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Reg./banks for sure. Tip: Have a talk with the band at the next rehearsal and try to have them commit to a routine set list. This will give you a solid platform to really enhance the sound of the band as you can set up your board(s) accordingly.

If your a sideman that night only(jobber), or in a band that likes to hop around different tunes each night, different animal completely! Still use banks but set them super basic. Your fave piano, organ, strings, brass, pad. You mentioned 2 boards so as long as there is a bass man, I would set up one of them for piano only and run a separate mix with it since what e-qing makes the piano shine, makes the organ sound like sh!t and vice versa.

Anyway thats the way I roll and its kept me busy and nobody threw any beer bottles at me.....yet. :laugh:

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
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Since the last road work I did back in 1991, my preference has always been that the only thing I have to touch with my hands during a gig are the keys and the controller levers/wheels. I just save patches in the respective default User bank of the day and have initial program change calls set up in Cantabile on a tablet computer. I use a Lake Butler Sound Midi Mitigator foot controller to send PC to the tablet, and the tablet sends PC and other setup info to the keyboards. One footswitch press between songs and I'm gtg. I arrange the songs in the Mitigator into setlists, and can jump around to find a rogue song if needed. The ProgramChange doesn't actually go out until I hit the footswitch. On Cantabile I just have one master songlist with ProgramChange number assignments on all songs.

 

~ vonnor

Gear:

Hardware: Kurzweil Forte7, Korg Kronos 2

Software: Cantabile 3, Halion Sonic 3 and assorted VST plug-ins.

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I use the Kurz PC3 and use both setups as well as programs. The PC3 has a mode called Quick Access and you can put up to 10 program/setups in an individual QA bank. So my top 10 programs/ setups are in one bank staring me in the face all night. The next 10 are in the next bank (one click away). Without QA mode, I would be frustrated with the PC3; with QA mode it's super easy.

This...

 

I currently use the "setlist" function on my Kronos and it is absolutely awesome..

...and this.

 

dB

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Yamaha Master Mode for me, too. My band doesn't stick to the setlist order (and sometimes call out tunes not even on the setlist) so I organize my sounds by usage and type. Bank A are the common sounds, B are the organs, C are less common sounds, D thru F are song specific setups. From hearing those with other keyboards I don't think I could give up Master Mode.

 

A slick feature I've used for those who use Yamahas is to setup a Master patch to point to one Voice/Performance and then overriding it with a program change. For example: Girls Just Want to Have Fun. When I call it up in Master Mode I've got the organ sound and a synth brass (this is the override). For the solo I switch to Performance Mode where I play the marimba/popcorn sound (this is what MM is actually pointing to). Then back to Master to finish the song. Master Mode takes me right where I need to be going to and from Performance Mode. It saves me from taking up 2 Masters for the same song.

Live rig: Roland FA-08, Yamaha MOTIF ES 6, laptop for supplemental sounds.
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I'm hampered by the Nord thing (NS2). I can only access 20 patches (A:xx:1 through D:xx:5) without changing "pages". So I have all my "bread and butter" patches in page zero - things like organ over piano, piano with string pad on the expression pedal, rhodes, clav, wurly and so on.

 

Then each band gets a page of its own, with up to 20 patches for specific songs with more complex requirements (odd sounds, or splits, basically). So I'm hopping between page 0 and the band's specific page.

 

Cheers, Mike

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Yamaha Master Mode for me, too.

.

 

Ditto for me for all the aforementioned. Master Mode is it, especially if you need a mix of voice/performance patches throughout the gig.

 

Here are two additional things I do with my Yamaha XF6 . . . (they are both so easy a caveman could do it . )

 

1. The "Favorites" feature. Especially if I'm doing a one-off show with charts, I may need to quickly assemble a set of patches. You can find the patches quickly with via the "categories" then just one-click them into the "favorites" list. Then I just scroll through those to get the gig done.

 

2. Song mode. For basic gigs (casuals/weddings), the XF is a MIDI slave, and I have a song (nothing sequenced in it) with 16 sounds on 16 channels available, respectively. Slick and easy.

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