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Regrets, we've had a few


AlanV

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So in reading through this group, it seems we've all has GAS at one point or another.

 

But in your mind, what keyboards do you regret getting rid of?

 

For me, it's 2:

 

1) My first synth, a Roland JX-8P with PG-800 programmer. I got it in college for $400 (and the PG-800 off eBay later on for $150). Learned the basics of synthesis on it but never really used it live. Nowadays, I would be using it all the time. I really miss the fat sounds from that thing.

 

2) EMU VK6 Vintage Keys. This was a workhorse. I used it for several years as my 2nd tier board in junction with my Roland VR-760, and then the time came when I no longer needed more room in my living quarters than I did keyboards.

 

There may have been a thread on this but I haven't come across it.

Nord Stage 2 SW73, Kurzweil PC3LE7, Moog Sub 37, Alesis Ion, Rhodes Stage 73, Moog Werkstatt-01, Yamaha CP-300

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All of em. But none of 'em.

I wish I could have kept at least one of my Hammonds (The Hammondstore chop), and at least one leslie.

 

Maybe one of my JD800s.

 

Definitely my MiniMoog D.

Should not have sold my Voyager for an in ear rig either.

 

I wish I had my ARP ProSoloist and Solus.

 

I wish FedEX hadn't destroyed the Pianet/Clavinet Duo I bought on ebay from a Canadian....I never even got to play it.

 

Other than that....my late 80's Spector bass, and my black fretless jazz bass would have been nice to keep.

Hitting "Play" does NOT constitute live performance. -Me.
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But in your mind, what keyboards do you regret getting rid of?

Not a keyboard, but my original Leslie 122. I've had others, they haven't sounded the same. Even my organ tech at the time had said he had never heard one like it, it was the ballsiest stock 122 you've ever heard. It was 30+ years ago, I sold it for $300, and the guy never even gave me the second $150 payment he had promised me. (I was more naive then...)

 

Other than that, I regret putting a Baldwin electric piano and a couple of Optigans in a dumpster.

 

And I kind of regret getting rid of my MemoryMoog pretty cheaply only a few months before I found that there was actually a place that could have gotten it back into good working condition.

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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In the mid 90s, I sold a pristine Minimoog to fund the purchase of...

 

an Alesis S4 module...

:facepalm::freak::cry::sick:

In the 70s, I traded my Rhodes for a "Sound CIty" electric piano (basically a ripoff of the Univox piano that Edgar Winter wore). But honestly, they both sucked. Some Rhodes pianos had wonderful actions. Not mine.

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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I hear you about the basses.

 

I'm a lefty and managed to score 2 left-handed basses relatively cheap off of eBay back in the early 2000s.

 

One is a 1974 Greco that is a copy of a Fender Jazz. Sunburst, maple neck, black binding, block inlays, all original including the sticker on the case from the guitar store in Japan.

 

The other is a 2000 Warwick Corvette that the previous owner had converted to a fretless and replaced the bridge J pickup with a P pickup for more tonal variety.

 

Got each one for $400.

 

I could easily sell them for well more than I paid, but I keep them hanging on my wall as "functional art". Don't really play bass anymore but once in a while I'll get into the brown water (read: whiskey) and take one down and noodle for an hour or so.

Nord Stage 2 SW73, Kurzweil PC3LE7, Moog Sub 37, Alesis Ion, Rhodes Stage 73, Moog Werkstatt-01, Yamaha CP-300

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I have at one time or another, owned a lot of the classics all of which I regret getting rid of.

 

Here they are:

 

1) Wurlitzer electric piano

2) Arp Odyssey

3) Hohner Clavinet C

4) Vox Jaguar

5) Juno 106

6) Ensonic Mirage

7) Leslie 145

8) Yamaha DX100

9) Viscount Drawbar organ-thee best pure clone I ever had

10) Korg X3-not a classic, but great all around work horse

 

Of course I choose to sell these so I could purchase the next great, lighter, easier, etc. keyboard but it sure would have been nice to keep these AND buy the new ones!

 

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I know, it's tempting to want to keep everything. Right now I have a ton of keyboards I'm meaning to sell, it's a matter of being sure of exactly which ones!

 

But yeah, it would be cool to have kept every board I'd had, even though most of them, honestly, I'd probably never use. But I've sold a lot of nice stuff. A Minimoog D, a Clavinet C (funny that you and I both had that one, with the D6 being the much more common), Korg Poly Ensemble P, original Mini-Korg, Yamaha CS60, DX7, ares some of the more interesting ones that come to mind. I still have my Viscount dual-manual drawbar organ, though it probably hasn't been turned on in 15 years. Really liked the action on that one! (Much better than the orig. Korg CX3/BX3 of the time.)

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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Moog Prodigy - bought new in 1980 (or thereabouts). What a great little synth for live use, with a very sweet tone. Sold in the mid '80s, and regretted almost instantly.

 

Wurlitzer EP200A (possibly the one in this picture ) bought from one of the members of 10cc around the same time as the Prodigy. I came to appreciate the Wurli more and more, liking it better than a lot of Rhodes I played, but sold it when I had to quit a gig due to illness.

 

 

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Some Rhodes pianos had wonderful actions. Not mine.

 

Oh, man. I had an 88 suitcase back in the 70s that was awful. To this day, I blame my lack of technique on that thing.

Live: Roland Jupiter-80; Yamaha S70XS (#1); Mackie 1202VLZ4, IEMs or Traynor K4

Home: Hammond SK Pro 73; Yamaha S70XS (#2); Wurlitzer 200A

Quik-Lok X stands!!!

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My former rhythm guitarist has a mint Moog Rogue he bought at Sam Ash in Paramus NJ when they were blowing them out for $100 way back when.

 

Original carton, manual, power supply, everything.

 

I've played it a few times but he refuses to let it go, even though it just sits on a shelf in his practice space/studio.

Nord Stage 2 SW73, Kurzweil PC3LE7, Moog Sub 37, Alesis Ion, Rhodes Stage 73, Moog Werkstatt-01, Yamaha CP-300

-------------

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Who's there?

Interrupting synthesizer

Interrup-MOOOOOOOOOG

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I always felt a guilty happiness when i was selling an instrument. Not so for the money but because my ideal setup is a macbook and a controller that could do everything :)

Really though, i regret selling my 3 Rhodes's, even though i would never drag again one out for a gig and i prefer my Electro. I aslo regret selling an old monophonic Korg i used inmy group's first cd, and my old SY35.

Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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Easy.

 

Was forced to sell my circa 1975 (Ser # mid 6000's) MiniMoog Model D to help pay for school around 1980. That thing would have been in pristine condition today....also sold a Yamaha CS-80 for what I paid for it about ten years ago. If I had held onto it a couple more years I could have sold it for 5X, but I really didn't miss it (too many maintenance and tuning issues).

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Huge regret 1952 Fender bass serial #1098 ! Best sound, particularly the decay characteristic. Basses have too much sustain, even my current bass, a 1963 Fender, good, but too much volume after the attack. The notes volume should drop right after the attack, THEN sustain and finally release. I guess that's called punchy.

I played another early 1950's old Fender like mine, owned by one of the elec bass greats Paul Jackson.. it had that same characteristic, of decaying perfectly, to create punchiness to die for.

My 1952 was stolen out of a NYC guitar shop, owned by Pietro Carbone ( whose name I once saw in reference to him knowing Charlie Parker, the awesome alto sax genius ) - i threatened the guy, and he paid me what I had paid for it- in installments. Talk about regret.

 

B3 Hammond supposedly pre owned by Mark Stein from Vanilla Fudge, had an intermittent problem that drove me crazy. Killer B3. I sadly sold.

 

Forgot, I miss a chopped Leslie I owned. it was cut in half, and the amp could be removed as well... so three pieces.

 

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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I've own about a dozen rhodes, and though no digital keyboard can replace them, I don't really miss any of them. They all had problems, uneven action, etc

 

Miss the Hammond Chop I owned in the mid to late 90's. The innards were a model "A" and it was a ferocious beast that would have fit right in on a stage with Steppenwolf. Sold it when I was zenning out before moving.

 

Lately I've been missing the CP5 I had a couple years ago. Great keyboard!

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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Rhodes 73 Stage Mark I. Sold for $100. It was in great condition too.

 

I also wish I hadn't parted out my Clavinet D6 project. If I had just had more patience, I'm sure I could have found the parts I needed to finish it.

 

Most recently, I have regretted selling my Jupiter 80.

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Moog Liberation keytar, in white; bought it from Tom Schuman (Spyro Gyra), who bought it from Chick Corea. I never actually used it on-stage (though I saw several concerts in the '80s where Tom did.) It was, however, the only keytar I've owned that was big and hefty, and didn't look like I was wearing a ukulele.

 

Many years ago I tried to sell my Yamaha KX5 keytar (which *does* look like I'm wearing a ukulele), but my wife said "absolutely not!". (She's emotionally invested it that piece. :blush:)

Legend '70s Compact, Jupiter-Xm, Studiologic Numa X 73

 

 

 

 

 

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No regrets. :cool:

... and the horse you rode in on.

Fact is, most of the gear mentioned in this thread isn't so rare or unique that it isn't replaceable. That's why I have no regrets about selling gear. Yeah, it would be very costly to replace some of these instruments, but it *is* possible.

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ARP 2600

Ensoniq ESQ-1

Waldorf Microwave 2

 

...but if I had an opportunity to buy them again, I wouldn't now. I'd rather use software like Logic's Sculpture & ES2, AAS stuff, PPG WaveGenerator, Waldorf Largo & Nave, Moog Animoog, Madrona Labs' Aalto, NI Prism.

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Anyone who says they have no regrets is not being honest imo - we ALL have regrets. Some folks refuse to acknowledge mistakes is all.

 

Saying it is possible to still buy old stuff back is not really the point is it.

 

I regret pretty much every board after it goes...if it wasn't for the sale of gear to buy other gear, they (all the 'boards) would be sitting here now, right back the the Rhodes 73 Flatop(+Dyno) and the Roland JX3P. The first two "non-acoustic" keyboards I ever owned.

There is no luck - luck is simply the confluence of circumstance and co-incidence...

 

Time is the final arbiter for all things

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Oh, and I just remembered my old Baldwin electric harpshichord (real strings). Cool board.

 

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

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No regrets. :cool:

... and the horse you rode in on.

Fact is, most of the gear mentioned in this thread isn't so rare or unique that it isn't replaceable. That's why I have no regrets about selling gear. Yeah, it would be very costly to replace some of these instruments, but it *is* possible.

 

It "IS"? Tell me where I can get a 1952-53 Fender bass? ha, this bass was uncommon back then!

A chopped Leslie? Only have seen this one.

A Killer B3? Not just a good one, a killer one. Know what I'm saying? Never heard a B3 like this one.

 

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

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Anyone who says they have no regrets is not being honest imo - we ALL have regrets. Some folks refuse to acknowledge mistakes is all.

True, but we eventually get over it and "console" ourselves with what we have now. :) I can't honestly say I miss anything I've sold enough to want it back. However, there are a few times I wish I'd known how much the value was going to increase on it after I sold it...

 

I dumped my old white faced Odyssey for something like $75 back in the early `80s. I sold my old Prophet 600 back in `92. I was in a traveling band and no longer used it in my rig, so I couldn't justify carrying it around. I ended up selling it for $150. If I'd only known... :crazy: Sometimes I miss my old Yamaha SY77, but I console myself with my EX7 that I picked up silly cheap. :cool:

 

The only regret that I still have is for the one that got away. A few years ago someone donated a living room condition Hammond A102 to the local Salvation Army, and they were selling it for $75. :o When I went to try it out the tone wheels were apparently seized, so I thought it was dead. I learned here that a good oil soaking for a few days would bring it back to life, but apparently someone else already knew that. When I went back to get it, it was sold. :cry:

><>

Steve

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Anyone who says they have no regrets is not being honest imo - we ALL have regrets. Some folks refuse to acknowledge mistakes is all.

True, but we eventually get over it and "console" ourselves with what we have now. :) I can't honestly say I miss anything I've sold enough to want it back. However, there are a few times I wish I'd known how much the value was going to increase on it after I sold it...

 

I dumped my old white faced Odyssey for something like $75 back in the early `80s.

 

I sold my mint condition Minimoog that I modded with CV out and gate in for $600 in 1981.

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