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Non-guitarist inspirations


hurricane hugo

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What masters of other instruments have inspired your guitar playing?

 

Personally, I've always taken lots of inspiration from drummers. From early drum heroes like Sonny Grier to modern-day players like Mastodon's Brann Dailor, I've always learned from percussionists. They've not only enhanced my rhythm playing, but my melodic phrasing as well on both guitar and voice.

Speaking of voice, I spent a fair amount of time playing guitar along to Anita Baker's voice back in the day. Invaluable lessons in learning how and when to add ornamentation to a melody line.

 

...that's enough from me for now. Your turn.

 

idea stolen from Canoehead over at the Keyboard Forum.

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I love everything about John Coltrane's, McCoy Tyner's, and Miles davis' playing. While I haven't undertaken a systematic assimilation of any of their works, their music has greatly influenced what I reach toward at times.

 

When I was still in High school, I came up with a piece in DADGAD Tuning that was inspired by the way some of the passages in Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring made me feel.

 

And the little snorty noises that Bobby "Blue" Bland does between (vocal! :D ) lines filtered into my phrasing as percussive accent slurrs and scrapes and such against the strings in-between more conventionally played parts.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Miles on horn, Ponty's violin, Grace Slick's voice - Annie Haslam from Renaissance, too. Barber's Violin Concerto, Opus 14, Stravinsky's Firebird, Bernard Herrmann's soundtracks, those are just a few . . .

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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Duane Allman once said that he was inspired from horn players and spent a lot of time learning trumpet lines on guitar - especially lines from Miles.

SEHpicker

 

The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it." George Orwell

 

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Yeah, yeah! Miles Davis, too. Particularly the Kind of Blue album. :cool: I HAD to go back and edit him into my previous post!

 

Now, come to think of it, in general, I have often been required to (crudely, I'll humbly admit) approximate or suggest keyboard parts for sections of songs like "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "Midnight Rider", sometimes making good use of feedback, octave-fuzz, and my Boss RT-20 Leslie-sim to do so. More than once I've been asked to prove to someone that it was I that was "playing a Hammond B-3 and Leslie", and not some hidden keyboard player in the wings or a sequencer or loop or the like... :D Which has informed and influenced some of my playing, such as chord-voicings in general and fingerstyle with bass-lines and voice-leading.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Piano! (to include organ, horn and strings, etc. on keys). I love old Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard and Ray Charles tunes. The Doors and Stevie Winwood did some great organ stuff. The guys I can't name that wrote and played some fantastic piano parts for Elvis in the 50's on the first gold record album. I love the piano runs in Joe Cocker's band. All the old jazz greats to include Nat King Cole. Elton John, Neil Sedaka, Carole King, Barry Manilow, Billy Joel, all great singer/songwriters/musicians...the list goes on and on. The music they wrote and performed influenced me greatly and I even played keys for awhile. I plan to fall back into it someday when my guitar hand gives out...
Take care, Larryz
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Keyboard players-I mean that to include pianists like Oscar Peterson as well as guys like Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson. I love the versatility, you can sound like a piano, like an organ or like outer space. I dig what some players can do with just a guitar and amp, but that is not me. The wider my palette is the better. It doesn`t mean I`m always going to USE everything, but at least I have it.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I see too many names listed before me to bother repeating. I'm not too interested in the name game thing. Many of those inspired me, some didn't. But the only way most of them isnpired my guitar playing was to instill the desire to play better.

 

And to drop only one name, WHY no mention of CHARLIE PARKER?

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Rudolph Serkin, the brilliant classical pianist.

 

Brilliant technique coupled with incredible passion and lyricism.

 

(AND RAY CHARLES!!!! Ain't nobody could lay it down like "Baby Ray"!!! If you've ever heard him play "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" you will be amazed at the soul he instills in what is basically a "throw away" piece of music.

If you play cool, you are cool.
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Name dropping is at the heart of this thread question. So I'll drop another famous non-guitarist master that still inspires my guitar playing and love for the raspy voice, trumpeter Louis Satchmo Armstrong! What a beautiful world of inspiration. Just for kicks my favorite master of the violin is Jack Benny! I love the fact that he can't play it but believes so much in his dry humor that he always tried to pull it off...and then on Sax, I Love Lucy! :love:

 

ps. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3cc0HlO7so <--- actually Jack could play violin!

Take care, Larryz
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Randy Korhs - The way he plays lap steel is the way I want to play slide.

[video:youtube]

 

 

 

Buddy Cage

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZWw87UgrwI

 

Sneaky Pete

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzgDzTmegr0

 

Ragun Cajun

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlAN29BOQxY

 

Paul Franklin

[video:youtube]

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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Rudolph Serkin, the brilliant classical pianist.

 

Brilliant technique coupled with incredible passion and lyricism.

 

(AND RAY CHARLES!!!! Ain't nobody could lay it down like "Baby Ray"!!! If you've ever heard him play "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" you will be amazed at the soul he instills in what is basically a "throw away" piece of music.

 

Fred, I saw Serkin play with the DSO back in the late '70's. Beethoven's 4th piano concerto. Everything you said is true, and THEN some. The fact I still remember how stellar his playing was after this much time says something.

 

As for Ray? Ray had the rare ability to take what you called "throw-away" songs and the mundane and turn them into works of art! Ever hear his treatment of "Oh, What A Beautiful Morning" from "Oklahoma"?

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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As for Ray? Ray had the rare ability to take what you called "throw-away" songs and the mundane and turn them into works of art! Ever hear his treatment of "Oh, What A Beautiful Morning" from "Oklahoma"?

Whitefang

 

And what about his version of "America"? Every time I hear him say "Now, wait a minute" just before the last chorus I feel like I'm viewing the Mona Lisa.

Scott Fraser
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Ray Charles was all in when he presented himself, he was a good performer of course, but he was a genius at being all in when he sang a song, he let it all hang out, something many performers are a little too reserved to do. Not Ray he let it all out there. That is why he was so great in my mind. Someone gave me a DVD full of 40's and 50's MP3's thousands of MP3's and of course I got all of those old Ray Charles songs. You can bet they are on my MP3 player.
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<---dumb like a fox. Ray doesn't stay true to the note for note original Oklahoma song and I think that's why he inspired me the most when it comes to the way I like to approach playing guitar and doing my own arrangements...+1 DBM he definitely gives it his all too!
Take care, Larryz
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I grew up liking the drums until around 7th grade when a band called, "Free Fare" jammed at our school and got me interested in the guitar. Heck, you guys might have had a similar band play your school. They traveled across the country and was also known as "Freedom Jam."

 

Anyways, I guess the one drummer who inspired me was Ron Wilson of The Surfaris. You know... "Wipe Out."

 

I absolutely loved that song as a kid!

 

 

"Treat your wife with honor, respect, and understanding as you live together so that you can pray effectively as husband and wife." 1 Peter 3:7

 

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Hey, BiC, does that make you just shy of being old enough to remember SANDY NELSON? I started( unsuccessfully for several reasons)taking drum lessons due to his influence.

 

My Mom tried getting me piano lessons before I could even READ real good, and they went nowhere. Drums failed due to money being tight, among other things. But I believe that at least the efforts taught me to appreciate those who play them well, and made me a more discernable music listener. I always said that being in a band once, and experiencing how hard it is to get only four or five guys to play music in time with each other is why I appreciate what a 60-80 piece symphony orchestra does.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Hey, BiC, does that make you just shy of being old enough to remember SANDY NELSON? I started( unsuccessfully for several reasons)taking drum lessons due to his influence.

 

My Mom tried getting me piano lessons before I could even READ real good, and they went nowhere. Drums failed due to money being tight, among other things. But I believe that at least the efforts taught me to appreciate those who play them well, and made me a more discernable music listener. I always said that being in a band once, and experiencing how hard it is to get only four or five guys to play music in time with each other is why I appreciate what a 60-80 piece symphony orchestra does.

Whitefang

 

I graduated high school in 1988. But, I don't recall a Sandy Nelson. I still don't know who that is! :blush:

 

Besides saying, "That cool drummer from The Edgar Winter Group on Frankenstein!" or "That cool drummer who plays Wipe Out!" I probably could have named only one drummer (by their actual name) as a young pup- and I'm talking about when I was in my single digits- and that likely would have been Buddy Rich. :D

 

"Treat your wife with honor, respect, and understanding as you live together so that you can pray effectively as husband and wife." 1 Peter 3:7

 

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I graduated high school in 1988. But, I don't recall a Sandy Nelson. I still don't know who that is! :blush:

 

Well, then..."88? I got married for the SECOND time in '88! You must be around my FIRST daughter's age.

 

Sandy Nelson was a drummer who was famous in the late '50's and early '60's, and released "hits" that were heavy on Krupa inspired drumming like "Teen Beat", "Let there Be Drums" and "Drumming Up a Storm". "Teen Beat" was arranged by Bruce Johnston( yeah, the BEACH BOYS guy) who also played on the record. After losing a foot in a motorcycle accident, Nelson still found a way to keep playing. You can find a lot of clips on YouTube of old films and newer ones that display that at age 75 or so, can still "slap them skins".

 

Let me know if you hunt them down, and what your impression was if you did.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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