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Home Studio Soundproof investments�


dalpozlead

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Hi guys, this is more of a random question about the general usage of rockwool (or stonewool) in US & Europe homes and studios.

Here in Brazil we don`t largely use this materials, but I`m reinforcing an existing wall with a drywall filled with rockwool prepared from a specialized company, this will help me to increase the sound barriers to my neighbors.

Is this kind of construction and the use of the rockwool insulation common in other parts of the globe? I wonder if its healthy safe

:-) sorry for the handyman question :-)

Tks!

 

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I think you'll get a better response on the Ethan Winter Audio Expert forum over at the EQ section Here. There are lots of discussions over there regarding home studio construction and acoustic treatments.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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The hardest to block is the bass. To block it, you need two things: mass and flexibility. One of the simplest add-ons (that is, without rebuilding the wall completely) is to hang drywall on these little spring-like things (Dan, do you remember what those are called?) Ideally, IIRC, you have the regular drywall, and then add another layer of drywall with space between, and the new layer is suspended on these springy tabs. Also, IIRC, you can hang two sheets instead of one, for additional isolation. There's a special rubbery material you place between the two sheets.

 

I knew this stuff once upon a time but those brain cells died.

 

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By "rebuilding the wall completely" I mean rebuilding the studs. The best approach is to stagger the studs so that each stud attaches to only one wall, rather than the normal two. That is, you make the wall an inch or so wider with twice as many studs, half for the wall facing one way and half for the wall facing the other way. Probably feasible only for new construction, requiring wider boards for top and bottom caps, but who knows, maybe a clever carpenter could fit it into an existing wall somehow.
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