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I bVII IV songs?


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I'm making a rock medley starting with "Born This Way" by Lady Gaga and want to add some other hits based on the classic I bVII IV rock progression. In G, it's ||: G | F | C | G :||

 

 

[video:youtube]

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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The Who: Won't Get Fooled Again, I Can't Explain, New Song (from Who Are You, the chorus, maybe not so well known, but funny since the words are "I write the same old song with a few new lines"), and probably others

 

BTO: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

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I'm making a rock medley starting with "Born This Way" by Lady Gaga and want to add some other hits based on the classic I bVII IV rock progression. In G, it's G F C. I have thought of the few I listed below but am looking for something other than these...

 

Gloria

More Than A Feeling

Taking Care Of Business

You Got It -Roy Orbison

Sympathy For The Devil

Coda vamp of Hey Jude

 

I'm not an expert on this subject..... But isn't the chord progression you cite in the Key of C? When the song ends, is the last chord a C? If so, I think it is just a a V-IV-I progression.

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OMG, how could I forget... Sweet Home Alabama! ;-)

 

Ya beat me by seconds!

 

Some others:

Werewolves of London - Warren Zevon

All Summer Long - Kid Rock

Anytime - Journey

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I'm not an expert on this subject..... But isn't the chord progression you cite in the Key of C? When the song ends, is the last chord a C? If so, I think it is just a a V-IV-I progression.
OMG, how could I forget... Sweet Home Alabama! ;-)
Oh god please, not again! Not so soon!

 

:laugh:

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Bingo: "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" is the exact chord progression as "Born This Way". Thanks.

 

||: E | D | A | E :||

 

"Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" + "Born This Way"[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2aBOTNGWMY

 

[video:youtube]

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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At the risk of being turned to ash, I'd like to submit that these are not "I bVII IV" songs, but instead "V-IV-I" songs. The first chord is not always the "I" chord.

 

 

Good night.

Muzikteechur is Lonnie, in Kittery, Maine.

 

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At the risk of being turned to ash, I'd like to submit that these are not "I bVII IV" songs, but instead "V-IV-I" songs. The first chord is not always the "I" chord.

 

 

Good night.

+1

For what it's worth, the link below is to a decent analysis of why Sweet Home Alabama, which was cited earlier in this thread as an example of a "I-bVII-IV" progression, should be considered a ""V-IV-I" progression.

 

http://www.guitar-music-theory.com/blog/sweet-home-alabama-guitar-scales-chords-and-music-theory/

 

 

 

 

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"Born This Way" is a I bVII IV I progression.

 

Bingo: Madonna's "Express Yourself"

Bob Seger's "Gamblin' Man"

"Nothin' but a Good Time" - Poison

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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Man there are a lot. How about "Sweet Child of Mine," "Our Lips are Sealed," "Saturday Night's Alright For Fighting" uses that same progression but in two different keys for the verse and the chorus. The first chord is the tonic in all those examples I would say. When playing that progression, I usually use the same trick of holding that same tonic note on top for the second chord (the bVII) to make it an add9 sound, always sounds good and adds a little spice compared to just playing triads.

Rich Forman

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Oh yeah! "Saturday Night's Alright For Fighting" is a perfect companion for "Born This Way" and "Sweet Child Of Mine" maybe for a mellower interlude.

 

Thanks

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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the other "born this way"... "express himself" - Madonna (not only the same chord progression, but the same song).

Dan

 

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"Born This Way" and "Express Yourself" are by different composers and hold different copy-writes. I don't think they are the same, just similar.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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"Born This Way" and "Express Yourself" are by different composers and hold different copy-writes. I don't think they are the same, just similar.

 

I understand that, but "Born this Way" is clearly a rip-off of "Express Yourself".

 

NSFW:

[video:youtube]

 

Haven't tried it, but I also think during the talking part of "Born this Way", you could throw in "Vogue".

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Actually, here's another one that's not a mashup, just matched pitch and tempo and overlayed the two songs:

 

[video:youtube]

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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If it's a rip off, then why hasn't a copy write infringement been filed? Because the melody and lyrics are sufficiently different, thus they are different songs that are similar in tonal material.

 

Madonna has even recently stated covering "Born This Way" in concert.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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