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Keyboard equivalent to Stevie Ray Vaughan


analogman1

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Hey Folks,

 

As the title says, who would you consider to be the "keyboard equivalent" to the great guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan? I'm talking everything from harmonic approach (with substitution chords, interesting turnarounds etc.) as well as the melodic style of soloing Stevie was famous for.

 

Your thoughts? I'm revisiting the blues in a big way this year, as one of the things I've been wanting to do for a long time, and finally have some free time to do it.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Tom

Tom

Nord Electro 5D, Modal Cobalt 8, Yamaha upright piano, numerous plug-ins...

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This strikes me as kinda like asking for a horn player equivalent to Ray Brown, or the Fiddle equivalent to Lionel Hampton. :crazy:

 

I always dug SRV (though I preferred his brother Jimmy). He mostly played like Albert King, but brought so much passion and fire to his performances that he got a lot of new people into the Blues. I suppose Jimmy Smith had a similar effect and brought a wider audience to the B3, so maybe he's the answer to your question.

Don't rush me. I'm playing as slowly as I can!

 

www.stevenathanmusic.com

https://apple.co/2EGpYXK

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SRV not a favorite blues guitarist of mine. But he is a pretty good rock player, He reminded me more of Trower than anyone.

 

Some Blues pianists I like not yet mentioned: Sunnyland Slim, Memphis Slim, Katie Webster, Ray Charles, Pinetop Perkins etc.....

 

Some newer guys. Victor Wainright, Bruce Katz, Jim A. .... One of my favorite players who doesn't have a huge blues discography per se but can play the Hell out of the blues is Bukka Allen.

 

Those are some names I pulled out of my butt I like.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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Absolutely OT... Steve, those "5000 Fingers" animations are great! grin thu

 

OT Thanks Carlo :) I've loved (and related to) that movie since I was a kid. :)

That Keyboard Ballerina's pretty cool too :cool:

 

For years I've wondered how come some of the Avatars moved (and what the heck was a gif anyway :laugh: )

Let's just say it's the Holidays, and not any slowdown in the record business that has afforded me some time to look into it. ;)

Don't rush me. I'm playing as slowly as I can!

 

www.stevenathanmusic.com

https://apple.co/2EGpYXK

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Hey Folks,

 

As the title says, who would you consider to be the "keyboard equivalent" to the great guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughn? I'm talking everything from harmonic approach (with substitution chords, interesting turnarounds etc.) as well as the melodic style of soloing Stevie was famous for.

 

Your thoughts? I'm revisiting the blues in a big way this year, as one of the things I've been wanting to do for a long time, and finally have some free time to do it.

 

 

I do the same thing. While I always love the blues, musically I get pulled by other styles. So Every couple years I go back to them. Its like revisiting an old friend. :)

Thanks in advance!

 

Tom

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
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There is an excellent DVD/soundtrack from, I think, Austin City Limits. "A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan."

Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Dr. John, Art Neville, and Jimmy Vaughan, plus Stevie's old band.

Each does a SRV tune. None of them are half the guitar player that SRV was, with the exception of Clapton. The performances are interspersed with archive footage of SRV playing over the years. Stevie could just close his eyes and go to "that other place" where the spontaneity just flows. Jimmy Vaughan is an OK guitarist, but he's not close to any of the other guitarists on the DVD. IMHO, He couldn't carry his younger brother's guitar case.

So, to find a keyboard equivalent to SRV, you need someone who can solo for hours without repeating him/herself, is melodically inventive, a technical wizard, and can do it seemingly effortlessly: Oscar Peterson.

Muzikteechur is Lonnie, in Kittery, Maine.

 

HS music teacher: Concert Band, Marching Band, Jazz Band, Chorus, Music Theory, AP Music Theory, History of Rock, Musical Theatre, Piano, Guitar, Drama.

 

 

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Around this corner of the world SRV inspired a whole sh*t ton of blues playin', big belt buckle wearin', 3 name usin' blues geetar gods-and they ARE gods, just ask 'em....you know what kind of night you're in for when you ask them what they play and they say "LEAD guitar"....I can't think of anyone in the keyboard realm that has inspired so much heroic emulation as SRV....
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There is an excellent DVD/soundtrack from, I think, Austin City Limits. "A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan."

Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Dr. John, Art Neville, and Jimmy Vaughan, plus Stevie's old band.

Each does a SRV tune. None of them are half the guitar player that SRV was, with the exception of Clapton. The performances are interspersed with archive footage of SRV playing over the years. Stevie could just close his eyes and go to "that other place" where the spontaneity just flows. Jimmy Vaughan is an OK guitarist, but he's not close to any of the other guitarists on the DVD. IMHO, He couldn't carry his younger brother's guitar case.

So, to find a keyboard equivalent to SRV, you need someone who can solo for hours without repeating him/herself, is melodically inventive, a technical wizard, and can do it seemingly effortlessly: Oscar Peterson.

 

Sorry I got to step in for Robert Cray. He is more than an equal to any blues guitar player. Period. I'll stop here so as not to start a flame war on the subject, but check him out.

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Doing cross-instrument comparisons is tough, but here goes...

 

B3: Lee Michaels

 

Piano: Ellis Hall

I think there are too many differences being compared to one another here to be useful.

 

Lee Michaels was just a thought however upon reading the following post I would retract the name, partly because Lee Michaels has always repeated himself. If you listen to the other B3-centric tune from the same album (Stormy Monday) he reuses distinct riffs which shows either poor choice and/or limitation. He wasn't influential enough either.

 

I would not name Eric Clapton as someone similar to SRV for the same reason. I hear Clapton following the same patterns and using the same riffs in various songs all of the time......it really shows in his more recent live recordings (since the late 80's?). It is sort of a fallback one might succumb to in jams but the leads in songs performed live can be constructed and rehearsed to weed out and avoid such errors.

 

There is an excellent DVD/soundtrack from, I think, Austin City Limits. "A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan."

Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Dr. John, Art Neville, and Jimmy Vaughan, plus Stevie's old band.

Each does a SRV tune. None of them are half the guitar player that SRV was, with the exception of Clapton. The performances are interspersed with archive footage of SRV playing over the years. Stevie could just close his eyes and go to "that other place" where the spontaneity just flows. Jimmy Vaughan is an OK guitarist, but he's not close to any of the other guitarists on the DVD. IMHO, He couldn't carry his younger brother's guitar case.

So, to find a keyboard equivalent to SRV, you need someone who can solo for hours without repeating him/herself, is melodically inventive, a technical wizard, and can do it seemingly effortlessly: Oscar Peterson.

 

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I'm no Oscar Peterson( you say you got that right) but Stevie repeated licks as much as other guitar players. There is about 5 or 6 common licks in the blues vocabulary , its how you use them that might make you special. Stray out of the vocabulary and you have strayed from the blues. Certainly he was an uncommon master of these licks and played them with depth but the rest is just hero worship.
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