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Digital piano cheap


rockinredeye

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My relative wants to get an inexpensive digital piano for her daughter to take lessons. I found a few (Yamaha P-35, $449US) but she balked at the price. If that's too much, maybe I cannot help her. But, am I missing something? Is there a digital piano out there with weighted keys for less? Not a pro board. It can be plastic and weigh 10 pounds. Needs built in speakers.

 

Or maybe I'm the one stuck on weighted keys. I don't teach. Can someone really learn on a semi-weighted keybed? Or even synth action? A real AP would be best but that's not going to happen.

Thanks for any input.

Kurzweil PC3-76
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Have you and/or your relative scoured your local Craigslist? It's surprising how often you can find people literally giving away acoustic pianos to anyone willing to move it. These aren't likely to be incredible instruments, but many are perfectly fine to learn on for the price of regular tunings. Make sure you check the "Free" listings in Craigslist in addition to the section with musical instruments.

 

And no, IMO, you shouldn't try to learn to play piano on a semi-weighted or synth-action keybed.

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Check Craigslist for a used Casio Privia or CDP-100 piano. The CDP-100 is the oldest of the line but is still a decent piano, and can often be found (used) for $250. They still go for that after many years, so clearly, they're holding their value, because they are good enough for this kind of use.

 

You may need to watch for a while to snag one at that price. Sometimes they come with stand, other times you'd need to add a $40 X-stand from Musician's Friend.

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All good advice here.

 

I'll reiterate that you DON'T want to learn piano on a synth/semi-weighted action. You'll learn too many bad habits that will be tough to overcome.

 

I would not recommend getting a used acoustic because they need to be tuned regularly (and most people don't). So you'll end up with a suck, out-of-tune piano. Makes it hard to hear chord intervals, harmony, etc. I would think it would also make it harder to stick with because the sound would not be very gratifying.

 

Stick with a used digital piano. Just about any used DP with a weighted action would be a good choice, regardless of age.

 

Also keep in mind that you'll need bench to sit at the proper height. (around $40)

You may also have to buy a sustain pedal. (another $25)

 

I teach piano and believe that even though a DP is not quite as good as an acoustic, it is a better choice for the average person.

 

Greg

Kurzweil Forte, Yamaha Motif ES7, Muse Receptor 2 Pro Max, Neo Ventilator
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Good points, Bif, except that I've played some older Clavinovas that I wouldn't wish on an enemy: the sound is so bad, they'd be discouraging. This despite the fact that I'm a big fan of Yamaha in general.

 

Also, a DP is not as good as a *good* acoustic, but it's better than at least half of the pianos out there, based on my random sampling.

 

To get a used piano that's better than the digitals we're talking about would cost well over the P35, even if it's "free", unless you can move it and tune it yourself. And at least half of acoustic pianos are junk anyway (sad to say). Many of these "junk" pianos might be fun to play for a bit after being tuned, but are less useful as a learning tool than a digital.

 

Many of these "junk" pianos, with a healthy dose of TLC, could raise to the level of "fun to play, character" pianos. IMHO, most "character" is better for the good player than the novice, and TLC isn't cheap.

 

Of course, anything is better than nothing, and there are great players who were weaned on terrible pianos. But these days, stick with digitals until you play well enough to appreciate the difference. If nothing else, they're easier to move or get rid of if it doesn't "stick".

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Good points, Bif, except that I've played some older Clavinovas that I wouldn't wish on an enemy: the sound is so bad, they'd be discouraging. This despite the fact that I'm a big fan of Yamaha in general.

 

Also, a DP is not as good as a *good* acoustic, but it's better than at least half of the pianos out there, based on my random sampling.

 

To get a used piano that's better than the digitals we're talking about would cost well over the P35, even if it's "free", unless you can move it and tune it yourself. And at least half of acoustic pianos are junk anyway (sad to say). Many of these "junk" pianos might be fun to play for a bit after being tuned, but are less useful as a learning tool than a digital.

 

Many of these "junk" pianos, with a healthy dose of TLC, could raise to the level of "fun to play, character" pianos. IMHO, most "character" is better for the good player than the novice, and TLC isn't cheap.

 

Of course, anything is better than nothing, and there are great players who were weaned on terrible pianos. But these days, stick with digitals until you play well enough to appreciate the difference. If nothing else, they're easier to move or get rid of if it doesn't "stick".

 

Guess I shouldn't have said "any" digital piano, though I haven't played any that are really old. I believe what you're saying.

 

Agree with everything else written. The digital piano is a good compromise and is most certainly easier to get rid of than an AP.

Kurzweil Forte, Yamaha Motif ES7, Muse Receptor 2 Pro Max, Neo Ventilator
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