Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Music Therapy


George88

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 25
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I know nothing about it.. but this, one cannot assume the a specific piece will consistenly yield the same positive responses in the patient. I met someone who is into it.. but cannot recall who!! Maybe I need music therapy ;-)

 

Tangentially, check out pioneering psychologist Roberto Assagioli, the founded of Psychosynthesis. I thought somewhere in his comprehensive material there may have been mention of music therapy.

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's plenty of info online about music therapy; it's now an entire medical discipline - with degree programs, and board certification. I worked, part-time, as an assistant music therapist in NW Indiana several years back. Though I have an undergrad degree in music, I would need additional study - plus board certification to be a licensed music therapist; that's pretty much a requirement for working in the field now.

 

Check out the AMTA website: www.musictherapy.org ; it's a solid resource that will either answer your questions, or point you in a direction to get answers. From my limited experience I can tell you that there are many different tools of the trade that music therapists use - depending on the situation. Evaluation of the patient, then determining a course of therapy is both science and art; and like any therapeutic approach is subject to change / adjustment while in process.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today it is about 50% percent of my duo act's income. Though I am not licensed I do have over 10 years ex. so I feel I can be helpful.

What I learned is music is crazy powerful! It has always been that way for me on a personal level for me, but it is on a scientific level as well. It is very effective in trama/ rehab situations. So much so that I can honestly say I witnessed nothing short of miracles because of it. It is by far the most rewarding work I've done.

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today it is about 50% percent of my duo act's income. Though I am not licensed I do have over 10 years ex. so I feel I can be helpful.

What I learned is music is crazy powerful! It has always been that way for me on a personal level for me, but it is on a scientific level as well. It is very effective in trama/ rehab situations. So much so that I can honestly say I witnessed nothing short of miracles because of it. It is by far the most rewarding work I've done.

 

That's encouraging to hear; glad that you're still able to earn income through music therapy, and able to be of service and support. I still do what I can - either volunteering occasionally, or working as a 'therapeutic musician'.

 

When I was hired by a large hospice based in Chicago / Northwest Indiana, their legal department determined that I was able to provide music therapy, but recommended that I seek the additional coursework and board certification. I had been in contact with a university in Indiana to begin that process on a part-time basis; the estimate was approx. one year to be board certified. Our change in location put that on hold, however.

 

When I arrived in Colorado I sought out work in the area of music therapy, but found the legal climate regarding credentials to be much more severe. While I did do some limited work for a nearby hospice, ultimately their management determined that the legal liability was too great; so the senior music therapist took over the the two patients I'd been seeing, and that was that. Colorado State University in Fort Collins has a very highly regarded music therapy program, but when I had a meeting with the program director I discovered that the coursework leading to being certified was much more extensive than what I'd planned to do in Indiana. Basically I'd have to test pretty thoroughly to determine if I was qualified to be a music major at CSU - this after already having a B.A. in Music from Columbia College, Chicago, and 25+ years experience in teaching, gigging, session work, and a year of providing music therapy. :rolleyes: . Then I'd need to secure a second, undergraduate degree from CSU - specifically in music therapy - before sitting for the board exams. Between the condescension I felt from the hospice senior music therapist, and the way in which my degree and experience were essentially dismissed by the department at CSU, I decided enough was enough. While I understand the need for additional study (do it all the time), I don't see the point in starting over from scratch.

 

bluzeyone, you're fortunate to be able to use your talent and experience to serve in music therapy. And the trauma / rehab patients, and associated care facilities are lucky to have you. I sure miss that midwest common sense :cool: .

 

 

 

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a great thread. Bluzeyone, without giving away any trade secrets, can you tell us how this works? I can't picture it. Does it work like talk therapy? Does the patient participate by singing or playing a drum or something? Or is it more of a passive thing where the patient lets the music unlock whatever it's gonna unlock?

 

There's no doubt in my mind that music unlocks powerful emotions. It's why we all do what we do, right? I just don't know the mechanics of how that works in a therapeutic setting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well for us we just treat it like a gig/living room jam session. We get one on one with direct attention to the audience. First thing I try to do is make everyone very comfortable with us and play songs that was popular in their era with as much energy and emotion as we can manage. Sometimes 1000+ mile work week makes that hard to do. Honestly the music takes care of the rest. Many times we had RN tell us that "so-n-so" haven't been out of their room in months until they heard the music down the hall. Or "so-n-so" doesn't talk but sang every word to Stardust.ect..

I've put in my time on the road playing with bands or being a "jobber" and for me personally, this work we are doing now is more fulfilling. Not to mention some of those old standards are a challenge to learn and arrange. I like to say "In each of them old tunes is a lesson." :)

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are the tunes sung? How many times do you go through a tune ?

Do you repeat it a lot. Or aim for shorter versions ( again how many times ) that maximize NUMBER of tunes, not repetitions of the same song

 

I am not sure if one time through is too little

Or one and a half times or more ?

 

How do you make them comfortable Direct attention.

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I met a Music Therapist a few years ago when I purchased a piece of gear from from him. He worked in a hospital and was kind enough to invite me to his 'studio' there and show me what his work is about (which unfortunately I never got around to see).

 

In that aspect and envirenment, its regarded and served just like any other Palliative Care, as I understood.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was born on a Dairy Farm , and believe it or not , music settles and calms the COWS in the milking shed , was always music being played while they were milked or else :).

 

Brett

 

Was not expecting this thread to go there, but what the hell, I love this clip.

 

[video:youtube]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought Musicophilia recently and look forward to reading it! Before my father passed away, music brought him, and my family, a lot of comfort in the palliative care ward. A musical therapist administered this therapy, and we also played music that he loved. Listening and playing music also brought me a lot of comfort in private.

 

I realize this doesn't contribute anything technical to a conversation about music therapy, but as musicians, perhaps this serves to remind us that we are bounded by our love for music, and our belief in its positive and powerful nature. The arts can be of great comfort to each of us, our society, and even our pets. I look forward to browsing the AMTA website for more information about this subject, which has touched me personally.

~ Sean

Juno-60, Juno-G, MicroBrute, MS-20 Mini, PX-5S, R3, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The approach varies. Sometimes it's participatory on the part of the patient, other times it's more of a listening and absorbing experience; sometimes both. For most patients I selected a set of familiar songs and pieces that bring comfort and encouragement; I received a lot of valuable info from interviews with family members, and the patient - when they were functionally conscious. For those who are alert and conscious, the response was easier to gauge, and thus adjust to when needed. When providing therapy to one who is not fully participatory, and perhaps actively dying, connecting pace and rhythmic inflection to breathing is very beneficial. I've seen those who are barely responsive to other stimuli break into a small smile - or at the very least respond with some small, physical affirmation - upon hearing a favorite song.

 

One fellow, who was a terminal cancer patient, requested that I show up at his apartment weekly to listen to favorite music from different times in his life, and to talk about his experiences. Basically that falls under 'Life review', and 'Reminiscence' - which are part of the discipline of music therapy.

 

Sometimes, as bluzeyone's experience shows, music therapy is a group effort - with various combinations of musicians and more than one patient.

 

Music Therapy in the US started around the time of World War II - when it was found to be highly beneficial for musicians to come into hospitals and LTC facilities to play music for soldiers under medical care. It's grown tremendously since then - which is a good thing; but also has become increasingly structured and code oriented (largely for insurance coverage purposes - but also can be helpful, as I was told, for choice of treatment ). This can make its application a bit frustrating - as I was told a few years ago: ' Music Therapy must be prescribed in order for it to be a covered medical expense' . I was told by both a music therapy professor and senior music therapist to not list myself as, nor provide a card representing myself as 'Music Therapist' - without proper education and board certification; apparently the risk of malpractice based, civil lawsuits is increasing. IIRC, some states now require malpractice insurance for music therapists.

 

I respect the scientific advances in understanding and applying music for medical use, but I suspect I would've done much better with this now somewhat aborted second career if this was the 1950's: Certainly simpler in approach and practice, but probably not that much less effective.

 

BTW, I like Wolvesparade's reference to Musicophilia. It's a fascinating and enlightening book. That one's a permanent part of my library.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BTW, I like Wolvesparade's reference to Musicophilia. It's a fascinating and enlightening book. That one's a permanent part of my library.

 

Joe P's reference actually! ;)

 

That was a really insightful post, allan! I never realized that "life review" and "reminiscence" were part of music therapy, but that makes a lot of sense. My father was very nostalgic, and talking about music brought him as much comfort as listening to it did. I wonder what the future will bring. Like you said, music therapy has entered a more codified existence. And yet, so many of us can find comfort in music without the certification. I think the accessibility of music nowadays can benefit a lot of people, whether on their commute, or in some sort of public forum. Of course, therapy needs to feel natural, not prescribed.

~ Sean

Juno-60, Juno-G, MicroBrute, MS-20 Mini, PX-5S, R3, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has been a pretty traumatic year for me on many fronts. Robberies, combat, auto accident, a few court cases. I'll stop there. I suppose it could have been a lot worse. I self medicate. Playing music is the only thing that keeps me partially sane. All the folks I've played with this year have been my therapy. And the folks I've played for too.

 

And all you folks as well. It's always good to see that Jazz for cows clip. :thu:

 

--wmp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are the tunes sung? How many times do you go through a tune ?

Do you repeat it a lot. Or aim for shorter versions ( again how many times ) that maximize NUMBER of tunes, not repetitions of the same song

 

I am not sure if one time through is too little

Or one and a half times or more ?

 

Direct by taking the time to walk the room before we play and talk with them. Even if they are not responsive I still talk to them a little about the day, weather, why our chicago bears suck(lol) ect. Then when we perform I talk to them in between songs making sure to make eye contact. I try to treat it like a party. That takes some of the "treatment" feeling out of the scene. The songs are all sung and a solo is usually stuck in there. Maybe a chorus or verse or both. Average tune time is 2-3 minutes making a set between 15-20 tunes. An hour is most program/sessions because of attention spans.

 

How do you make them comfortable Direct attention.

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a few friends planning to go into music therapy. Some are doing undergrads in music, another is in psychology.

 

Bluzeyone, do the patients play with you?

 

Sometimes they do. We definetly encourage it. Mostly we get them singing along

 

 

 

ow drops in on this thread. [/

 

quote]

"A good mix is subjective to one's cilia." http://hitnmiss.yolasite.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...