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OT - Jimi Hendrix documentary


jimtheswede

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The link above works....sort of.

 

It requires that you sign up with PBS and that they can share your information with whoever.

 

After I did that it took me to a "please wait" message that never seemed to end.

 

I wish PBS would make this watch option a little more user friendly. There is a lot of overlapping text on my computer, and so far I am not able to watch this.

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The link above works....sort of.

 

It requires that you sign up with PBS and that they can share your information with whoever.

 

After I did that it took me to a "please wait" message that never seemed to end.

 

I wish PBS would make this watch option a little more user friendly. There is a lot of overlapping text on my computer, and so far I am not able to watch this.

 

I watched it full length and full screen yesterday and without signing in.

Unfortunately downloadhelper failed downloading which worked for only a few seconds of the video.

 

A.C.

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I was able to watch it without signing in to PBS - just bypass that screen. Wonder what Jimi would have done had he lived longer? What a tragic loss!
PC3X, PC1se, NE2 61, DSI P08, ARP Odyssey MkII 2810, ARP Little Brother, Moog Slim Phatty, Doepfer Dark Energy, Arturia MiniBrute, Microkorg, Motion Sound KP200S,
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Thanks for the tip, it played for me without having to sign in.

 

IT's great to speculate about what he might have done if he'd lived longer, it's a shame we'll never know.

 

Look at his contemporaries, how many of them are innovative, how many sound fresh, how many are just phoning it in for the paycheck?

 

Who might he have collaborated with, would he have followed the jazz-fusion trail?

 

"Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you cannot play upon me.'-Hamlet

 

Guitar solos last 30 seconds, the bass line lasts for the whole song.

 

 

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I finally got it dialed in on Google Chrome.

 

It's nice to see some never seen before interviews. The initial part of script reads much like the original "Jimi Hendix" movie that was released by Warner Brothers in 1973.

 

In fact this PBS documentary features several interview segments from ( Hendrix's girlfriends) Faye Pridgeon and Linda Keith, who was instrumental in introducing manager Chas Chandler to Hendrix.Both were featured proninently in the `1973 movie. So in a way, it is like an update of that movie 40 years later.

 

It's also nice to see Paul McCartney's comments regarding seeing Hendrix during that period.

 

Later we get to see and hear Eddie Kramer breaking down the mix of "Little Wing" and some footage of Woodstock, Monterey, Miami Pop and the Band of Gypsys at the Fillmore East. There is also a brief segment of " Voodoo Child" ( slow version) with Jack Casady- but unfortunately no Steve Winwood in sight.

 

Overall, it a nicely produced project and watching this feels like time well spent.

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Good update from the '73 doc. However, I wish there was more info on his death. We know how he died, yet this doc just dummarized(sic) his passing. I wanted his family and other friends/musicians to opine in depth on his passing.

 

As far as what he would have accomplished if he lived? Probably, an symphonic orchestra production (like Deep Purple, ELP). Maybe, serious collaboration with ELP ie. HELP, (pure speculation). And, as mentioned, a jazz-fusion exploration.

Just wondering if he might have several paternity lawsuits await him, he had a lot of women!

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This is a piece from an article in the May 2013 of Rolling Stone. That would have been some group!

 

It's long been known that Jimi Hendrix and Miles Davis were making plans to record together the year before Hendrix's death in 1970, but it turns out the pioneering guitarist and jazz trumpeter were hoping that Paul McCartney would join them on bass. Hendrix, Davis and jazz drummer Tony Williams sent a telegram on Oct. 21, 1969, to the Beatles' Apple Records, hoping to get McCartney in for a session.

 

"We are recording and LP together this weekend in NewYork [sic]," reads the note, according to The Associated Press. "How about coming in to play bass stop call Alvan Douglas 212-5812212. Peace Jimi Hendrix Miles Davis Tony Williams."

 

It's unclear if McCartney was aware of the request. The telegram advises him to contact producer Alan Douglas, and is seemingly an impromptu note asking McCartney to visit New York from London on short notice. Beatles aide Peter Brown responded the next day, telling Hendrix and Davis that McCartney was out on vacation and wasn't expected back for two weeks.

 

 

 

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www.facebook.com/BigFunThree

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Great Documentary! I watched it complete last night without signing in. I remember from living through the old days that Jimi had to go to England in order to be "discovered". I was not aware that it was the original Animals bass player Chad Chandler that helped Jimi get a deal that led to the big time for the Jimi Hendrix Experience. His career was far too short.

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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This is a piece from an article in the May 2013 of Rolling Stone. That would have been some group!

 

It's long been known that Jimi Hendrix and Miles Davis were making plans to record together the year before Hendrix's death in 1970, but it turns out the pioneering guitarist and jazz trumpeter were hoping that Paul McCartney would join them on bass. Hendrix, Davis and jazz drummer Tony Williams sent a telegram on Oct. 21, 1969, to the Beatles' Apple Records, hoping to get McCartney in for a session.

 

"We are recording and LP together this weekend in NewYork [sic]," reads the note, according to The Associated Press. "How about coming in to play bass stop call Alvan Douglas 212-5812212. Peace Jimi Hendrix Miles Davis Tony Williams."

 

It's unclear if McCartney was aware of the request. The telegram advises him to contact producer Alan Douglas, and is seemingly an impromptu note asking McCartney to visit New York from London on short notice. Beatles aide Peter Brown responded the next day, telling Hendrix and Davis that McCartney was out on vacation and wasn't expected back for two weeks.

 

 

 

Just called that number... Told him that l would be there next weekend to sit in...

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I'm half-way watching it right now. I think at least some significant part of this rockumentary has been on the BBC (tv/sat) the other week, I've recorded that but only seen bits and pieces.

 

The sound of the web version is good, though I'd prefer a more kick-ass sound still, like for a powerful cinema or something, but it's great to hear the emperor of 70s funk play the king of guitar every once in a while!

 

T.

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Allegedly, Gil Evans was arrangimg material for a collaboration with Hendrix when Hendrix died. Imagine what could have come from that collaboration!

 

This veers a little towards conventional fusion, but it's cool to watch Evans approach to the Rhodes:

[video:youtube]

Turn up the speaker

Hop, flop, squawk

It's a keeper

-Captain Beefheart, Ice Cream for Crow

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