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VOX CoAxe Pups


simpleman3441

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LOL Well their newer guitars look really great, in theory. It's very difficult to hear the tonal nuances on my laptop speakers, however... :( I would have to drive a ways to get my hands on one, but I don't want to waste my time if they're not all they're cracked up to be.
We cannot accelerate the growth of a tree by pulling on its branches. - Ricardo Iznaola
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LOL Well their newer guitars look really great, in theory. It's very difficult to hear the tonal nuances on my laptop speakers, however... :( I would have to drive a ways to get my hands on one, but I don't want to waste my time if they're not all they're cracked up to be.

 

The 60s Vox guitars were made, cheaply, in Italy by EKO. They were really quite bad. The new ones have nothing to do with the old, & most likely are made in the same Asian factories used by most guitar makers.

Scott Fraser
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  • 2 weeks later...

I was able to get my hands on their SDC55 and I thought I'd share my thoughts for anyone interested.

 

The pickups did offer a variety of sonic options, but the difference was not quite enough to live up to the unreasonable expectations that I had built. When you hear someone say that they have fit the sound of a single coil, soapbar, and humbucker into one guitar, you might imagine that, in that one guitar, you could find the sound of a Strat, a Jazzmaster, and an LP. Or at least that was the fantasy that I found myself inexplicably expecting. In retrospect, I'm really uncertain why I was so gullible. Perhaps, I'm truly susceptible when you are promising things to me pertaining to my passion. My desire to have all the sounds in my head must make me particularly vulnerable. The "single coil" sound was trebly in a very tinny way, the "soapbar" sound was very warm, but lacked attack, and the "humbucker" sound seemed to simply be the sum of the two.

 

With regards to the construction and playability, it seemed well intonated and easy enough to play. The construction did seem to be of higher craftsmanship than the Gibson Midtown that a student recently purchased. (The Midtown tone was rather desirable, however. The binding was just really shoddy.) I wasn't impressed with the neck profile, either.

 

It might have been the extremely light weight of the instrument or my disappointment with the tone affecting my overall perception, but I felt it was grossly overpriced. All in all, very disappointed. I love their amps and was perhaps unfair in my hopes to find a guitar that I felt equaled that appreciation.

We cannot accelerate the growth of a tree by pulling on its branches. - Ricardo Iznaola
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I know people who've put the Seymour Duncan P-rails in Strat bodies and loved the results, combined with using preamps and EQ pedals to enhance some of the different pickup selections.

 

http://www.fenderstrat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/fender%20strat-66123703834998200.jpg

 

A Variax and the modeling software might get the "every guitar in one package" thing.

 

I wouldn't expect them to perfectly sound like a sampled clone of every guitar imaginable, but close enough to be tweaked a little more to get close enough... for cover gigs where I didn't feel like bringing 3 guitars.

 

Otherwise it's fun to collect samples of every type of guitar...

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The "single coil" sound was trebly in a very tinny way, the "soapbar" sound was very warm, but lacked attack, and the "humbucker" sound seemed to simply be the sum of the two.

 

That doesn't sound very appealing... :D

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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see, all the manufacturers know what kinda lies to spew to make us tumescent...

 

doesn't matter if it's accurate. it's like the true bypass myth.

 

true bypass CAN help tone...or can also help degrade it, as your guitar signal is still going thru jumpers and jacks.

 

sometimes a buffered signal is far better. but all ya hear about is bullsh*t these days....anything to make a buck.

 

these pickups are made of unobtanium, feature true bypass, and are wound with hair genetically cloned from Jimi Hendrix's afro, which we got after much bargaining with experience hendrix...alan douglas tried to keep this a secret...of course these pickups will change your life son...step inside here, boy, have a cigar....

 

it's all bullshit, me boyos... all designed to make ya drool and part with your hard or ill-earned cake.

 

like the proliferation of catalog sales....which is retarded. i don't care how much they lie about "plek'd" setups and other crap, you cannot buy a guitar without playing it and expect it to be "the one".

 

i could go thru a thousand guitars, and maybe find 2-3 that resonate with ME...and they probably won't be the ones the slingers are trying to sell me.

 

i remember going to gc with a rich friend a couple years ago...they were trying to get him to bite at this one les paul that was wayyyyyyy overpriced and wasn't even that nice looking...

 

"this is the best guitar in the whole store"...

 

what a crock...

 

there were epiphones that played and sounded better. there were COPIES of epiphones that looked played and sounded better.

 

they just were trying to justify getting top dollar for a guitar they were told to get top dollar for.

 

don't fall for the hype, guys...strings, picks, accessories...hell yah, catalog, online, whatever..

 

 

guitars and amps (yes, amps)?

 

hell no!!! you HAVE TO PLAY THRU THEM TO SEE IF THEY WORK FOR YOU.

 

no two are EVER the same...not even close.

 

sorry...did i forget the rant alert?

:D

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ps...in the long run? for what they quoted for that one les paul, he ended up leaving the store with an sg and a lp custom...

 

the two guitars i said were the best in the store. and he agreed.

 

for less than half the price. both beautiful sounding, looking, and playing gibsons, that he still has today.

 

rant done.

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I dunno... I think I respectfully disagree.

 

Amps are pretty consistent these days... people won't tolerate them otherwise. It's like buying a tv or computer. Do you want the display model? Or a pedal...

 

and increasingly guitars are consistent, too. All CNC routed...

 

If someone is having a custom guitar made should they order 3 or 4 and then only buy the one they like?

 

I mail order guitars if I have a window of time to send them back... I also have a great tech guy who can do wonders with anything.

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Otherwise it's fun to collect samples of every type of guitar...

 

Always plan to do so in the future. Trying to stop looking for short cuts. I need to just save and hold out for gems that come my way.

 

unobtanium

 

I like that. :laugh:

We cannot accelerate the growth of a tree by pulling on its branches. - Ricardo Iznaola
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I have an SDC-55 that I love! I will agree that the emulation of pickup tones aren't exact but they are at least reminiscent. I will also agree the guitar is a bit bright in nature. For me it plays like a dream, sounds awesome and is very comfortable to wear.

 

My opinion may be bias but I think the SDC-55 is an awesome guitar!

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I think it was a really decent piece and was mostly disappointed because, at $999.99, I was expecting a truly exceptional guitar. I would say that, if the only difference between the 33 and the 55 is the number of coil taps, the 33 would have an acceptable value. I thought the construction and playability of the instrument was equivalent to guitars around the $500 mark, though I'm a little more impressed with G&L's Tribute series...
We cannot accelerate the growth of a tree by pulling on its branches. - Ricardo Iznaola
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Maybe I'm just getting jaded in my old age,but I haven't run into a guitar that really knocked me out in a long time. I have played some good guitars, don't get me wrong. They sounded nice, played well, stayed in tune up & down the neck, performed electronically without untoward noises or cutting in & out, etc. But as far as finding anything amazingly special, not so much. They all just seem like electric guitars to me.

 

 

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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I believe I know what you're getting at. It's like the tone in my head... I think there's something out there that I'm just not getting, but really that's just my heightened expectations. Perhaps nothing will ever make me say, "Yeah, that's it!"

 

I'm a bit tired of buying things that are just close to what I want and then eventually growing tired of not having that thing it is lacking. I recently decided that I'm holding out for something that does it for me all the way. No more compromises. My ASAT Classic will do till something blows me away. I'm even selling everything else. Maybe my review of that guitar was tainted by this context. Maybe I was overly critical...

We cannot accelerate the growth of a tree by pulling on its branches. - Ricardo Iznaola
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You know they say one man's trash is another man's treasure.. So each of us will have a different view. I'm blessed to have a few really nice guitars and being a TrueFire Artist I have access to a bunch of very high end guitars like Gibson and Fender custom shops, Huber guitars, Buscarino, D'Angelico, TrueFire has a nice collection to say the least. So I'm familiar with well built high end guitars.

 

When Rich sent my SDC-55 to me I was expecting a "magical" guitar because, well, it's designed by a relative of mine who has a great reputation as a guitar designer. When I opened the box and pulled the guitar out of the gig bag my first thought was "probably great for rock but not a blues guitar" I was a Tele player for yrs and this guitar is very different. I figured maybe if I raise the action it might be ok for blues... I was wrong!!! I had a gig that night and figured I'd play the guitar for the first set and then switch to my tele, I never switched, played the Vox all night long and was amazed at how "magical" the guitar was for me. So here's my detailed review of the Vox SDC-55

I've had the guitar for about 1.5 yrs now and honestly I rarely play anything else, every other guitar just feels like I'm wrestling compared to the 55. The detail in design is amazing (to me), the shape of the tuners are a little strange but when you use them you realize they are the perfect shape for a tuner, it's just something I felt when I tuned, up/down they just feel right. The neck is comfortable and has nice string spacing (for me), the flatter fretboard allows more bending options, 2 strap buttons on the horn give a choice for guitarists of different sizes and shapes, the body contour fits comfortably for me and several friends that have played it say the same thing, the contour on the top is comfortable for the right arm, I never have to look for that comfortable spot, it's everywhere!! The bridge is very comfortable to rest on and unlike any of my other guitars the saddles don't slice up my palm. The controls and switches are pretty easy to get used to as well. Now for tone and electronics, the guitar has great tone to me but you can be the judge if you listen to it on my youtube channel. I will say it is a little bright of a guitar. The pickups are, to me, the secret weapon, 7 is like 10 and from 7 up it's extra crunch. No, the pickups aren't an exact replica but I think each sound is at least reminiscent and even though they aren't exact replicas they do sound awesome. I find the fender single coil setting is probably the closest to the real thing, the p90s seem to brighten up and get a little punchier and the humbuckers are a little darker, all sounds are balanced so the volume doesn't change when you make changes on the fly. As far as the claim of noiseless I would agree, these things are silent! And having so many tonal options is very cool, I tend to think pickups more than guitars when deciding on settings. Probably my most used setting is single coil in the neck and humbucker in the bridge.

 

As for the Variaxe, don't know if you all know but Rich also designed the Variaxe.

 

As for contacting Rich, I wouldn't be comfortable giving out his contact info without asking him first but I'll try to remember to mention this thread to him next time I talk to him. I'm guessing you could send email to Vox and ask to have it forwarded to him.

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Cool that Rich Lasner is your cousin. No idea he designed teh Variaxe. In case anyone doesnt know who he is, Rich Lasner has had a huge impact on guitar design in the last 25 years or so.

 

When he was at Ibanez he designed the Maxxass, the P-series, the S-series, the R-series (which later became the Satriani model). Oh, and the RG series and the Jem and the Universe.

 

At Yamaha he designed the Weddington and the Pacifica series.

 

At Modulus he designed the Genesis.

 

Most recently he spearheaded the reintroduction of Vox into guitar manufacturing with some pretty cutting edge models.

 

The guys no joke.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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Rich is a Guitar genius, what he did to guitar design is nothing short of amazing. there are things on each of his designs that should be standard on all guitars.

anyone who has ever seen an 80's Pacifica neck joint will know how Rich thinks outside of the box.

 

i actually seen a Maxxass in a local store when they first came out and if i had only known..

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  • 3 years later...

This is to add my two bits re: the Vox SDC-55 and the coaxe pickups. I agree with Steve Lasner: It's a very innovative guitar that feels, plays and sounds great. Double cuts are known for high fret access and this guitar's unique neck joint gives better access than any I've seen. I play slide, so that matters to me.

 

There's a lot of discussion above about the pickups. Most folks think it's hype, on principle. That's unfair. These pickups have astonishing clarity, clean or overdriven. I noticed that when I bought my first SDC, a 33. I liked it so much that I upgraded to the 55. The 33 has two pickup positions, single and double coil like sounds; the 55 has three. I say "like" because OK, they don't sound like a Fender or a Gibson. Well, if you want that sound, buy a Fender or a Gibson. This is a unique sound, and it's very musical. I play the SDC 55 through tube and tranny amps, and it emerges through other sounds in the mix beautifully. This thing sings.

 

I'll just say this. Guitar players are very conservative. That nearly killed Reverend, now recognised as a great guitar brand, when founder Joe Naylor tried new body materials that sounded great but confused many players. The same thing happened with the SDC series. I bought my first and second for 1/4 list price, a 75% discount, both new, because apparently the market spurned them. I might not have paid the standard street price for the SDC 55, which sold for $1000 at the time. I'm not a pro and I don't buy expensive guitars, and for me $1000 is expensive. I do buy high value guitars, and for what I paid, the SDC 55 is an incredible value. I suppose I should thank all the folks who didn't recognise it. If you grab one now, while they're sharply discounted, I'm sure you'll thank me.

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