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Help: Wife wants digital piano for xmas, and I'm clueless


DCDireWolf

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I'm clueless about a lot of things, but as a non-player, I'm completely clueless about digital pianos.

 

My wife is not a player, never played before. But she wants to learn. Our house is too small for a full size piano, but I figured a smaller, cheaper digital piano may allow her to learn (and maybe me too) and one day when we have a bigger house we'll buy a piano.

 

What would you recommend for a beginner, under 1000 bucks?

 

Thanks and happy holidays!

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Casio pianos often get good reviews even thought they are quite cheap. Here's a variety:

 

Clonk!

 

The PX130 might be a good starter piano, the PX830 looks nicer and has a more powerful (and better) speakers.

Nord Stage 3 sw73, Yamaha CP88, KeyB Legend Live, Kurzweil PC3K7, EV ZXa1 + sub. K&M stands, Hammond E112, Leslie 3300, EHX V256, Roland SE-02, Yamaha EX5R & TG77, Novation Nova desktop & much more...
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My wife is not a player, never played before. But she wants to learn.

Our house is too small for a full size piano, but I figured a smaller, cheaper digital piano may allow her to learn...

 

What would you recommend for a beginner, under 1000 bucks

Welcome to the forum Mr Wolf !

 

Are you looking for a portable piano, or one that will stay put?

 

The above suggestions are all good, but some have that 'stage piano' look,

 

& need a seperate stand, a trailing wire to the pedal(s) etc.

 

If you want something that will sit in the home & blend more with the surroundings,

 

that would focus on a more specific area of the market.

 

 

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

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My wife is not a player, never played before. But she wants to learn.

Our house is too small for a full size piano, but I figured a smaller, cheaper digital piano may allow her to learn...

 

What would you recommend for a beginner, under 1000 bucks

Welcome to the forum Mr Wolf !

 

Are you looking for a portable piano, or one that will stay put?

 

The above suggestions are all good, but some have that 'stage piano' look,

 

& need a seperate stand, a trailing wire to the pedal(s) etc.

 

If you want something that will sit in the home & blend more with the surroundings,

 

that would focus on a more specific area of the market.

 

 

Thanks! And I appreciate all the replies. I know my wife will be more concerned with something that blends in will with the home and living room, but I'll want something that will sound great and be less of a bumpy transition to an acoustic piano one day. Wondering if there is a good compromise model?

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I think you should make a pretty coupon to give her, worth one digital piano. Let her choose the model that feels best to her fingers, sounds the best to her ears, and that she finds appealing to her visually. She might prefer one that looks like a minimalistic upright piano (like a Casio Privia PX-330), or like any of the stage pianos mentioned above that sit on an X stand with a cable to an amp (or your stereo), or one without a stand but with built in speakers she can put on a counter to play and put in a closet when she's done (like a Kurzweil SP2XS). While the ones mentioned so far are 88 key piano-weighted, she can find any of the three types in 76 key smaller (and cheaper) versions which would probably be fine for her first couple of years of instruction.

 

My vote is a coupon, a kiss, and a visit to a good music store with informed musician salespeople. If there's none close by, make it a romantic overnight trip and score extra points.

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....

My vote is a coupon, a kiss, and a visit to a good music store with informed musician salespeople. If there's none close by, make it a romantic overnight trip and score extra points.

 

This would be my vote.

 

Personally I lke the Kawai and Yamaha stuff but the only Kawai in your price range is the EP3 which just a slab on a stand. Yamaha has several models.

 

Arius YDPS31 and Arius YDP135R are about a grand.

 

 

My daughter has one of these DGX keyboards and likes it. But for the living room you may prefer a Arius. PLUS the DGX does not come pedal equipped!

http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments/keyboards/digitalpianos/dgx_series/dgx-640_color_variation/

 

I don't care for the wasy Casio Privia DPs sound on whole note chords but they sound fine on fast stuff.

 

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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I think you should make a pretty coupon to give her, worth one digital piano. Let her choose the model that feels best to her fingers, sounds the best to her ears, and that she finds appealing to her visually. She might prefer one that looks like a minimalistic upright piano (like a Casio Privia PX-330), or like any of the stage pianos mentioned above that sit on an X stand with a cable to an amp (or your stereo), or one without a stand but with built in speakers she can put on a counter to play and put in a closet when she's done (like a Kurzweil SP2XS). While the ones mentioned so far are 88 key piano-weighted, she can find any of the three types in 76 key smaller (and cheaper) versions which would probably be fine for her first couple of years of instruction.

 

My vote is a coupon, a kiss, and a visit to a good music store with informed musician salespeople. If there's none close by, make it a romantic overnight trip and score extra points.

 

sage advice

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Thanks! And I appreciate all the replies.

I know my wife will be more concerned with something that blends in will with the home and living room,

but I'll want something that will sound great and be less of a bumpy transition to an acoustic piano one day.

Wondering if there is a good compromise model?

In that case I would suggest maybe Casio Privia PX-830

 

It's neat & tidy, got decent sized speakers (40w), 3 built-in pedals, nice feeling keys, & 128-note polyphony.

 

For a fraction under your $1000 budget, it should do the job nicely :thu:

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

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If he wants furniture style, he'll be hard pressed to get under $1k... not sure what the Yamaha Arius YPD141 sells for south of the border, but it's around $1100 up here... but that would do the trick (basically the P95 in a furniture style cabinet).

 

That's the one.

 

Casio is good value, but if she wants to play piano, Yamahas are that much more sophisticated in sound, action, and reliability.

 

 

 

 

____________________________________
Rod

victoria bc

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I'm clueless about a lot of things, but as a non-player, I'm completely clueless about digital pianos.

 

My wife is not a player, never played before. But she wants to learn. Our house is too small for a full size piano, but I figured a smaller, cheaper digital piano may allow her to learn (and maybe me too) and one day when we have a bigger house we'll buy a piano.

 

What would you recommend for a beginner, under 1000 bucks?

 

Thanks and happy holidays!

 

I would recommend spending your $1,000 budget in this way:

 

1. Consider a piano teacher

 

2. Rent a small acoustic piano or perhaps a digital piano that will fit in the space allotted.

 

If things work out, then consider buying something. You'll have a much better idea of what it's worth to you then, since now, you are clueless.

 

For someone who is not a player and has never played before, a good piano teacher is invaluable.

 

Consider this money well spent. If it doesn't work out, you won't have a keyboard to unload at half the price you paid for it.

 

Good luck!

 

Tom

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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If he wants furniture style, he'll be hard pressed to get under $1k... not sure what the Yamaha Arius YPD141 sells for south of the border, but it's around $1100 up here... but that would do the trick

 

That's the one.

A couple of points to consider here.

 

Although Yamahas in general are very good (I've owned a few, & still have the Motif xs7),

 

this goes over the $1000 budget mentioned, and has only half the polyphony of the Privia.

 

Also, it only has 2x6w speakers, so wanting that extra 'boost' may end up costing further $$$'s for external speakers.

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

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Probably opening a can of worms, but even entry-level Yamahas' APs sound like pianos, while Casios' APs aren't in the same league. A hundred bucks over budget will buy something closer to the piano experience, and should be better for resale (or trade if the OP goes back to a Yamaha retailer he buys the DP from). You can run a DP through a stereo (sounds better in the home anyway), and polyphony shouldn't be a problem in this case, don'tcha think?

 

 

 

 

____________________________________
Rod

victoria bc

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I'm clueless about a lot of things, but as a non-player, I'm completely clueless about digital pianos.

 

My wife is not a player, never played before. But she wants to learn. Our house is too small for a full size piano, but I figured a smaller, cheaper digital piano may allow her to learn (and maybe me too) and one day when we have a bigger house we'll buy a piano.

 

What would you recommend for a beginner, under 1000 bucks?

 

Thanks and happy holidays!

 

I would recommend spending your $1,000 budget in this way:

 

1. Consider a piano teacher

 

2. Rent a small acoustic piano or perhaps a digital piano that will fit in the space allotted.

 

If things work out, then consider buying something. You'll have a much better idea of what it's worth to you then, since now, you are clueless.

 

For someone who is not a player and has never played before, a good piano teacher is invaluable.

 

Consider this money well spent. If it doesn't work out, you won't have a keyboard to unload at half the price you paid for it.

 

Good luck!

 

Tom

 

This is sage advice. Brilliant. Also consider what kind of music you want to be able to play and discuss it with the teacher. I highly recommend renting an acoustic over a digital if possible.

We are all slave's to our brain chemistry!

 

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I wouldn't agree with renting an acoustic. You still have to tune an acoustic twice a year, at $120 a pop. And a lot of rental acoustics will be crap on a low budget. I'd go for the Privia PX-130 with matching stand, or similar Yamaha for a bit more coin (and not really that better sounding, IMHO).

 

The Privias are really quite good, especially considering the price, and you can move them easily. The cheapest Privias get the biggest portion of their retail cost back, if you decide to sell it. On the aftermarket, a PX-330 and PX-130 are pretty much the same price ($250-350). There's also the CDP-100 (recently replaced by a higher number, but we keyboardists prefer the CDP-100 for reasons that aren't important here -- the MIDI connector.) If you can find either of these it's pretty much the same as a PX-130.

 

I've played a lot of acoustic pianos that were garbage compared to a half-decent digital.

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I like the idea of giving the piano as a present, and the coupons for the lessons! You have an opportunity to make this a memorable Christmas present. I'd try to set up the piano sometime on Christmas Eve, after she goes to sleep. You will never forget the look in her eyes when she sees it in the morning!

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I wouldn't agree with renting an acoustic. You still have to tune an acoustic twice a year, at $120 a pop. And a lot of rental acoustics will be crap on a low budget. I'd go for the Privia PX-130 with matching stand, or similar Yamaha for a bit more coin (and not really that better sounding, IMHO).

 

While what you say is true, I still feel that renting a piano might be a good idea, if they could find a decent piano for a reasonable price. By having an acoustic I think it gives his wife the maximum chance of falling in love with, and developing a relationship with the instrument. Ive recently fallen back in love with the AP so Im on a bit of a high. FWIW, there are many pianos that have a footprint almost as small as many of the DPs mentioned. i presumed he was refering to a large piano, perhaps even a grand piano when he said they didnt have room for a big piano.

We are all slave's to our brain chemistry!

 

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Well you need to decide if you want on-board speakers (suggested) or if you want a separate amplifiers system (possibly xtra cash), unless you want to play it out of your stereo, if you have one.

 

Regarding the"look" of the piano, you either have a relatively uninteresting piece of electronics (sitting on a X stand) or a more homey board that comes with a stand.

 

I just did a quick look and the Yammi P155B looks good. Has the built in speakers, (and metronome) essential for learning. USB port for a thumb drive (you can record your lesson and save it. It comes with a stand and has a better overall living room look rather than a gigging board that is designed to be transported easily and often.

 

Good Luck on your quest,

 

Musicale

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I like the idea of giving the piano as a present,

Right, present :cool: If I've learned anything about women (and I assure you I haven't), it's that they like boxes and bows and shiny paper. They don't like coupons or going to the music store and getting "used" piannys. :laugh:

 

Guitar Center has this Yamaha on sale. clonk

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I wouldn't agree with renting an acoustic. You still have to tune an acoustic twice a year, at $120 a pop. And a lot of rental acoustics will be crap on a low budget. I'd go for the Privia PX-130 with matching stand, or similar Yamaha for a bit more coin (and not really that better sounding, IMHO).

 

The Privias are really quite good, especially considering the price, and you can move them easily. The cheapest Privias get the biggest portion of their retail cost back, if you decide to sell it. On the aftermarket, a PX-330 and PX-130 are pretty much the same price ($250-350). There's also the CDP-100 (recently replaced by a higher number, but we keyboardists prefer the CDP-100 for reasons that aren't important here -- the MIDI connector.) If you can find either of these it's pretty much the same as a PX-130.

 

I've played a lot of acoustic pianos that were garbage compared to a half-decent digital.

 

One of the requirements was an instrument that would support the transition to a piano. Only way I would get a Privia if it was setup with something resembling piano pedals (a triple pedal board - soft, sostenuto and damper pedals ). Something like this home rig.

 

Home bundle example

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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