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I'm auditioning for a band for the first time this weekend


scottasin

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So, being a youngster, I've never really auditioned before, all of my experience has been forming bands with my friends. I've met two out of the three current band members before, although only briefly, and they're both very talented (I'm inclined to think more so than I am). I've never heard their stuff before, but I think they play mostly originals. They're playing a show tomorrow night, so at least I wont be going in completely blind when I play with them, but, understandably, I'm kind of intimidated. From the 3 songs they have posted on their Facebook, they're a lot faster and heavier than anything I've really played before (I guess I'd describe them as heavy prog) and I'm not sure how I'll approach it sonically, my usual piano/rhodes/organ sounds just don't seem like they'll fit too well, and although I do own a synth, I don't know if it's the right synth, so to speak.

 

They said they've tried out a bunch of keyboard players already, but they just contacted me after a mutual friend suggested me.

 

Anyways, any pointers you guys might have would be greatly appreciated.

 

(here's their Facebook if you want to give them a listen)

 

EDIT: theres the link

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Genetics/153740141364311

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Where is the Facebook link?

 

What synth lead voices can you play that will work with this band?

 

I agree that the Rhodes and piano voices may not work with a heavy prog band. But organ with a dash of distortion might.

 

A trick that helped me was to bring along a (mini-disk) recorder and connect it to the PA mixer. After the gig, go home and practice everything on the recording. The next time you rehearse or perform with them you'll be much better equipped.

 

If it's three guys, I'm guessing it's drums, bass, and guitar.

 

If you fill in the sonic space with organ, that would be welcomed, I think. Otherwise, slip in a lead synth line when it's appropriate. Just don't step on the guitarist's sonic space. If you and he could trade off playing lead every four measures in a tune or two, that's a good idea. If you and he could work out a lead where you're playing in unison or harmony, that could work too.

 

Good luck, Scottasin!

 

Tom

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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For this time, and for all your future interviews, auditions and presentations: do your research.

 

Find out (or figure out) what they really need. Talk to them, ask for playlist songs to pick-up for the audition, know what parts do they expect you to do.

 

Chill, be yourself. I'm sure you have your very own style of playing and this usually transcends technical abilities for doing quick runs. Remember, they're probably not looking for a show-off, but for someone who'll make their band sound that much better.

 

Don't be lost all over your gear during audition. Prepare 4 or 5 simple sounds that you can have quick access to during the audition so that you can focus on your playing, as opposed to looking all around like "wait, I know that sound is there somewhere..."

 

And finally, look for a vibe, and get in it! But if it doesn't feel right to you from the start, if the chemestry with the other members isn't there, then there's gonna be no fun and so that band is no for you.

 

Good luck!

 

 

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I would advise that I hear enough time issues going on in what they're doing that if you audition, keep your ears real open to their sense of time, and be wary of getting too sold on their 'band'. You don't want their time issues to hamper your development of a good sense of time. The minute you start to hear bad time as normal, you're in for a long haul getting back to reality.
A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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What they said.

 

O/T - Santa, quite excited to see you posting on my favourite forum. I have to admit to some pseudo stalking - I read your previous posts.

 

Do you find that being from the North Pole, the Nord Stage - with its Scandanavian origins - is better suited to your needs than keyboards designed further south?

 

Also will your band require a dep over the busy Christmas period?

I'm the piano player "off of" Borrowed Books.
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On the 3 songs they have posted on the FB page, I can definitely hear room for Hammond and Rhodes. Hammond on songs 1 and 3 and Rhodes on song 2, maybe even on song 1 as well.

 

It doesn't sound like prog rock to me at all.

 

good luck with the audition! Just be yourself and have fun.

Live: Korg Kronos 2 88, Nord Electro 5d Nord Lead A1

Toys: Roland FA08, Novation Ultranova, Moog LP, Roland SP-404SX, Roland JX10,Emu MK6

www.bksband.com

www.echoesrocks.com

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+1 on Santa's comments on keeping things simple and being able to switch to your preferred sounds immediately.

 

Even 10 seconds of the rest of the band staring at you while you try and find a sound will seem like an age! Have a practice before you go just flicking through the sounds, so you know where everything is (and it's one less thing to worry about).

 

Do you know what bands they like? Can you find a sound that's recognisably like a keyboard sound in a band they'd like to emulate (mellotron, Jordan Rudess lead sound etc)? One sound that makes them go "wow, we've GOT to have this guy in our band" could win you the gig.

 

And remember a band is more likely to pick someone friendly and relaxed who can play the parts and who's gear works - rather than a great player who seems disorganised, or who has flaky gear, or who they suspect they may not get on with that well.

 

Don't be afraid to ask them to turn down a little if you can't hear yourself!

 

In other words, check your gear all works, then just relax and be yourself - don't worry about delivering the absolute best performance on the day. And good luck!

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You may not like the vibe - if there are time issues, I'd decline.

 

Keep in mind that Scottasin is one of our youngest forum members. Late teens early 20s if I'm not mistaken. With that in mind I don't think he should be turning his nose up at the chance to play with other musicians of an above average caliber, even if there ARE some issues with time.

 

Scott, you have no reason to be nervous. Think of yourself as the desirable one. If they try to vibe you by making you feel like they are badasses and you should be in awe, then F them. You're the badass, and you need to feel that way. But do your homework so you can FEEL like the badass.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Just listened. Yikes, Kanker is right. I don't know man. Their time IS pretty bad at times.

 

I am torn on whether I think you should play with them or not. They play the type of music that will put you in front of a lot of empty audiences. And their sloppy time could hamper your own development if you let it. I am not an oracle, but I don't see a band that plays this type of music really going anywhere, at least as played by these guys.

 

But on the other hand, you're young, and I think we all have to go through a period of kicking around with bands like this and getting some performance chops under our belt. At least I did. You will be forced to explore your sonic palette, and hopefully contribute to the compositional process a little bit too. Hopefully you'll grow to the level they're at (if you're not already) but then you'll keep growing THROUGH it and eventually shed this band. What is critical is what someone mentioned earlier - don't make this 'BAND' the end all and be all of your musical life. It's so important that you keep growing as a player, listening to other music and striving to grow and studying the greats.

 

They could use a singer too I think.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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I've been surprised more than once, where you learn the tune off the record and you go to play and you hear "every singer has their range/key"

 

Not when there is no singer.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Just listened. Yikes, Kanker is right. I don't know man. Their time IS pretty bad at times.

 

I am torn on whether I think you should play with them or not. They play the type of music that will put you in front of a lot of empty audiences. And their sloppy time could hamper your own development if you let it. I am not an oracle, but I don't see a band that plays this type of music really going anywhere, at least as played by these guys.

 

But on the other hand, you're young, and I think we all have to go through a period of kicking around with bands like this and getting some performance chops under our belt. At least I did. You will be forced to explore your sonic palette, and hopefully contribute to the compositional process a little bit too. Hopefully you'll grow to the level they're at (if you're not already) but then you'll keep growing THROUGH it and eventually shed this band. What is critical is what someone mentioned earlier - don't make this 'BAND' the end all and be all of your musical life. It's so important that you keep growing as a player, listening to other music and striving to grow and studying the greats.

 

They could use a singer too I think.

 

Bobby, I'm always amazed at how you often post things that would come right out of my own mouth (or fingers, as it were).

 

The only thing I'd add is, this might be a good band for you to join, despite time issues, IF you emphasize to yourself that this is not the end-all, be-all for you, Scott, and strategically find other playing opportunities that "fill in" the gaps that appear to be left by this band. Namely, a band that emphasizes (and therefore forces members to work on) groove. Looking back at my formative experiences, my very first "real" band (one that played out and earned money) was very groove-oriented, a blues rock band. Even with that simple groove base and usually not-too-complex changes, it was a challenge sometimes for the band to really groove, and I was the youngest and least experienced player in the band by far.

 

So it might be cool if you ALSO look into playing with a groove-based band, if you have the time and energy (at your age, the energy prolly isn't an issue ... ah to be young again *sigh*) to do both. Also depends on how much rehearsing you will be expected to do. Young bands often seem to rehearse several times a week, which has benefit, but don't lose perspective.

 

As Bobby said, this music is probably not going to draw big, so I'm going to add that gigs may be few and far between, unless these band members have a really good following of dedicated friends. So you might find your rehearsal and gigging schedule would allow you to also play with a band that will require you to master the basics of groove and feel. This band will probably allow you to work on soloing chops, maybe some composition (but the discipline of writing a tight song form may not come into play), but not groove feel, so much.

Original Latin Jazz

CD Baby

 

"I am not certain how original my contribution to music is as I am obviously an amateur." Patti Smith

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I listened to a song and a half. I'd say it's more jam band than prog. I heard no lead voice, so this could be a good opportunity for you to step into that role at least part of the time. Maybe for the audition you could work out a lead line to one of their tunes, just to show them you can do it. If they say they're not interested in that sort of thing, then I'd say you should pass on it.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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I like what they're doing and what they're trying to do, but the others are right, they have some time issues. It's most noticeable when they try to do some things like fills and changes. If they make you a member, maybe that's something you can work on with them.

 

P.S. As far as auditioning, be professional, friendly, prompt, responsible, reliable, etc. Be yourself, have fun, be as prepared as you can. You never know what they might throw at you. They might be trying to test you, or they might just have a tendency to make things up as they go. Judging from what they're playing, what they do they do to have fun so you should too! :thu:

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I just listened to their songs and for a young keyboard player that sounds like a fun project. I can hear tons of rhodes/organ/synth in there (in my head).

 

I like what someone else said about YOU are auditioning THEM too.

 

Remember that a band is not all about music. Do you feel comfortable with these dudes? Do you feel a rapport with them?

 

Sit down with their tunes and lay some parts out and have fun.

 

Just be glad they're not auditioning more than one keyboard player at once. One of my bands recently did a "casting call" for singers and had three there at once. What pressure for them! They all did great but it made it VERY clear who we wanted.

You want me to start this song too slow or too fast?

 

Forte7, Nord Stage 3, XK3c, OB-6, Arturia Collection, Mainstage, MotionSound KBR3D. A bunch of MusicMan Guitars, Line6 stuff

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Wow guys, as usual, thanks for all the great advice. This definitely wouldn't be the ideal band for me in a lot of ways, I do love playing jamband style music, but I also realize that its going to be tough to get any kind of following or go anywhere with it. Theres so many mediocre jam bands out there right now, even at the highest tiers of jam band, that the market is really oversaturated. But, right now I'm not in any bands so I figure its better to be in one and just get used to playing with people again rather than continuing to just practice by myself.

 

Regarding the time issues, I hear them as well, and its really surprising to me coming from this group of guys, the guitarist was the drum major for my highschool back when he was a senior, and the drummer was center snare on the drum line when he was a junior and senior, and our school is generally regarded as having one of the best drum lines around. Its been a few years since then, though, so they might have lost that precision (I'm also inclined to think that some of the issues might stem from the bassist).

 

Anyways, thanks again, great advice as always.

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Regarding the time issues, I hear them as well, and its really surprising to me coming from this group of guys, the guitarist was the drum major for my highschool back when he was a senior, and the drummer was center snare on the drum line when he was a junior and senior, and our school is generally regarded as having one of the best drum lines around.

 

One does not necessarily imply the other. And you're right, bassy is also at fault. Overplaying suckafool.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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There have been alot of good points made. Personally, I'd go to the audition with a smile on my face, a positive attitude about them and their music (regardless of whatever warts either may have) - and turn in the best performance I could muster. I'd keep that smile and attitude going right up until you find out whether they're offering you the spot or not.

 

If they don't offer you the gig - thank 'em for the opportunity, wish 'em the best of luck, and ask them to pass along your name to any of their musician friend who might be looking.

 

IF they DO offer you the gig, THEN it's time to make up your mind. Personally, I'd keep a couple of things in mind as you make your decision. First and foremost, there ain't a preacher present - so saying you'll take the gig isn't a lifetime commitment. Secondly, you've got to assess your situation and determine if you've got a better opportunity than the gig you've just been offered. If you do - your decision is easy. However, if you don't have a better option - and you feel that playing with them won't be painful (whether that's because you couldn't stand the material, the musicianship or simply because they struck you as assholes) - I'd take the gig.

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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If they don't offer you the gig - thank 'em for the opportunity, wish 'em the best of luck, and ask them to pass along your name to any of their musician friend who might be looking.

 

This.

 

Always leave a good impression, even if you don't get the gig. From the band perspective, it's never fun for the guy who has to call the people to let them know they didn't get the gig. He'll remember you if you're friendly and courteous about it. And he'll be thankful.

 

If you want the gig, walk on the audition like you're part of the band. Be friendly. And just play. That's it. Play. Don't think.

 

I just auditioned a drummer this past weekend for a gig. Guy had amazing chops but I didn't feel the kick in my stomach like I do with a drummer who has a great feel. I couldn't give him the gig. That's important. Remember to play from within. Feel good when you play. If you're feeling good and playing decent, they'll feel good.

 

Best of luck,

Frank

www.frankperri.com
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There have been alot of good points made. Personally, I'd go to the audition with a smile on my face, a positive attitude about them and their music (regardless of whatever warts either may have) - and turn in the best performance I could muster. I'd keep that smile and attitude going right up until you find out whether they're offering you the spot or not.

 

If they don't offer you the gig - thank 'em for the opportunity, wish 'em the best of luck, and ask them to pass along your name to any of their musician friend who might be looking.

 

IF they DO offer you the gig, THEN it's time to make up your mind. Personally, I'd keep a couple of things in mind as you make your decision. First and foremost, there ain't a preacher present - so saying you'll take the gig isn't a lifetime commitment. Secondly, you've got to assess your situation and determine if you've got a better opportunity than the gig you've just been offered. If you do - your decision is easy. However, if you don't have a better option - and you feel that playing with them won't be painful (whether that's because you couldn't stand the material, the musicianship or simply because they struck you as assholes) - I'd take the gig.

Great advice all the way around.
A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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