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Jazz on the water...


offnote

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Offnote, This proves nothing.

 

That was a very good example of how a non jazz musician can take a stab and and do a nice job at "coping some jazz licks". Playing the intro, to Joy Spring, note for note was a nice touch.

 

Don Airey is a university and conservatory trained classical pianist, first and foremost, so the chops are there. He has no doubt spent some time in the jazz idiom, although I didn't find the jazz soloing over Smoke on the Water, terribly inspired. He did a fine job on the Liszt, although I'd expect a conservatory trained classical pianist to do fine, so no surprise there.

 

What's your point?

 

No one was saying that there aren't SOME musicians that can cross over genres, but we're not talking about Keith Emerson or Jon Lord playing jazz (or classical), or Herbie Hancock playing blues or alternative, now are we? Ever heard Herbie play classical? Not too shabby, but he's not Horowitz, either.

 

Let's not focus on some of the more acclaimed players in the business and keep it a little more real life, shall we?

 

We were talking about the average musician on the street that usually plays in a handful of genres and often excludes others entirely (usually for good reasons).

 

Your typical rock, blues and pop guitar player won't typically have a bag of tricks to comfortably or credibly play a Wes Montgomery or Joe Pass tune. They usually won't be able to chicken pick a country tune like Albert Lee or Vince Gill either.

 

Why? It's because both of those styles and genres require a dedicated approach to the instrument that is beyond standard instruction.

 

It's not a slight in any way, but the reality of the situation is if you want to play something that has increased complexity, it simply takes more effort and a different bag of tools to get there.

 

It just "doesn't happen" by itself (unless you're some sort of savant).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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First video seems to be a rock band trying to play jazz (usually a bad idea), that's not jazz, but and imitation of it. They're not the worst imitators I've heard though (except for the guitar player, he really sucks this time!).

 

Second vid is better, but a lot of keyboard players started with classical music, and classical music training, so they are usually closer to that stuff.

Fun to watch and enjoyable, but most of the time for rock musicians I would say: stay into rock... :rawk:

 

And NO, rockers can't play jazz (usually)

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I know this has been posted before, but I couldn't resist! :D:facepalm:

 

 

 

This is hilarious! :thu: they got it down to the last detail!

 

 

As far as Deep Purple's interpretations. It has some jazz licks, but it does not "sound" jazz - so it's not jazz in my ears. That's my personal opinion though, no hard feelings.

Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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Is it jazz? Depends if there wasn't any improvisation.

I'd say it wasn't a true jazz performance because Steve Morse didn't seem to be improvising on his solo and Roger Glover was playing his well-prepared part he practiced. Don Airey did "swing" nicely on his solo. Ian Paice was the only player who had a creative performance, imo. There wasn't much any improvisation and Jazz is defined as a spontaneous improvisatory art form.

They did "swing" Smoke On The Water, but it's just a worked-out arrangement, not jazz.

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They did "swing" Smoke On The Water, but it's just a worked-out arrangement, not jazz.

 

yeah, you'e right it was not jazz - it was better then jazz.

gush...You completely don't know this band if you think they cannot improvise.

 

Hey DP dude, my post was regarding the video you linked, which I stand by my comments.

 

Of course they can improvise!!! :rolleyes:

 

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Jeez.

 

This is the problem with jazz. No matter what you do, you're not playing "jazz" unless everything is off-the-cuff and happens to include a (two 1/4 notes)=(dotted 1/4 note and 1/8 note) meter...

 

Because it don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing... :rolleyes:

 

:thu:

 

 

 

 

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DP had the good humor to try it in concert (making fun of themselves a little bit in the process), and the good sense to cut it short. Big props for both those things.

Gigging: Crumar Mojo 61, Hammond SKPro

Home: Vintage Vibe 64

 

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You can thank me now, or later. But this is jazz.

 

I have the Casualties of Jazz Album, and love the hell out of it. For one of my band's tours, we mostly alternated between that and the Herbie Hancock/Headhunters Live in Japan on the bus soundsystem for 2 weeks. Great stuff!

Turn up the speaker

Hop, flop, squawk

It's a keeper

-Captain Beefheart, Ice Cream for Crow

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BTW...Deep Purple were one of the first "jambands".

 

Zeppelin were right behind them.

 

Y'know I really think that Traffic were also one of the first Jambands as well. I went back and listened to a bunch of their early stuff recently, and was kind of surprised at how many bands around the NW jam scene, at least, sound a lot like them. I'm not sure how direct an influence they are, or if it's just a matter of a new generation of players getting to the same places independently, but I definitely hear it.

Turn up the speaker

Hop, flop, squawk

It's a keeper

-Captain Beefheart, Ice Cream for Crow

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This is the problem with jazz.

 

Did you mean : with everything?

Purists will be purists :snax:

 

Yeah, purism is poison in any genre, you're right.

 

I've never been so much of a purist that I won't tolerate musicians who don't fit into a genre playing music of that genre, though... unless it's someone claiming to be playing prog rock while churning out a 3 minute tune with traditional V/C/V/C/B/C song structure... :P

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