Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Sept. 18, 2011 3:56 pm EST


Rampdog

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 6
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I checked my MacPro not too long ago and it's okay. My older G4 is being revamped for my daughter to use. My laptop just had a new logic board installed and a new 7200rpm hard drive (battery sucker) so it was cleaned also.

 

I'm in my computers a fair bit changing drives, adding memory etc and I always also clean if it needs.

 

So I am good to go, but yeah man....good advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Static, is the number two killer of computers...

 

I always ground myself, but Craig....why is that exactly, I have never fully understood that?

 

I often wonder how a relatively small amount of current from a static arc, can trash a computer that must have components rated for higher current handling....even the chips etc? Especially given that the static is an extremely short duration and the amperage is possibly very low.

 

What specifically gets damaged or destroyed by the static Craig? I am interested to know and too lazy to Google it... :sick::laugh::blush:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Static, is the number two killer of computers...

 

I always ground myself, but Craig....why is that exactly, I have never fully understood that?

 

I often wonder how a relatively small amount of current from a static arc, can trash a computer that must have components rated for higher current handling....even the chips etc? Especially given that the static is an extremely short duration and the amperage is possibly very low.

 

What specifically gets damaged or destroyed by the static Craig? I am interested to know and too lazy to Google it... :sick::laugh::blush:

 

Basically the Hard drive and microchips are at risk. I looked up the numbers for you. Here is some basic info from the article I got the numbers from. You can find the full article HERE , which explains in further detail:

 

The internal workings of a computer, and especially the hard drive, are extremely susceptible to static electricity, which can cause considerable damage to the hard drive if it is zapped with even a small amount. Microchip damage can occur if it is exposed to static electricity as low as 10 volts, and humans are not able to perceive static electricity until it has reached about 1,500 volts.

 

Walking across a rug can produce a static electricity voltage of up to 12,000 volts, but static voltage is not life threatening. So it is possible to damage a hard drive with static electricity that is not even felt by the person because it is at such a low voltage. Also, computers become increasingly susceptible to static electricity damage as more and more circuitry is built into them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...