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Plz recommend: decent cheap home stereo amp/receiver


JeffLearman

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I just moved into a new house that has a speaker distribution system, and I want to hook it up. I was hoping to use my trusty old NAD 7155, but evidently it's no longer so trusty: power amp seems dead on both sides (fuses are all good).

 

Please recommend a half-decent inexpensive amp/receiver to use to drive the load. 8-ohm or 4-ohm system is fine; don't need 2-ohm capability. The volume controls in the rooms are rated for 60 watts. The amp's load will be divided at least in half and probably to 1/4 at each unit, but I won't be using these at high levels anyway, so anything in the 40 to 100 watt range is probably suitable.

 

I'll be looking on ebay or craigslist for suitables, but I'll buy new if there's a good reco. I like NAD gear but I fear that the ones I'm used to are just too old (the 4-digit series). Plus they're still commanding high prices on ebay for the 20-watt models.

 

I'm hoping to spend under about $100, so it's petty cash and doesn't need approval from the purchasing department.

 

This won't be my primary stereo; it'll just be for background music around the house or for parties. Audiophile quality not required, but crap not desired.

 

Thanks!

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I am a Yamaha fan myself. While Yammy is not top of the line with NAD, Adcom, Carver etc. they are good value. Their receivers are known to last many years. I have an RX-485 which I have had more than 15 years and aside from some remote glitching it has performed flawlessly. Very low noise and a very good FM tuner if you do radio.
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Having had audiophile quality gear, I would also recommend Yamaha as having a rep for decent quality. Same is true of Onkyo. Both will, of course, have anecdotal detractors but my experience with both brands has been flawless. Marantz is a classic name that went mass market in the '80s (when Superscope bought the brand and manufacturing went overseas), but nowadays is also offering good, reliable gear. I think they're under the same ownership umbrella as Denon, which might also offer options you might consider.

 

 

 

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Well I can't recommend anything around $100, but when I had my old NAD repaired, the service center advised me not to put too much faith in it, as they refered to the company as Normally Always Defective. I had already decided to upgrade to a Rotel, and when I got the unit back, I tested it and all was good.

I stored it in the basement for about a year, then decided to sell it. Pulled it out of the box before the buyer showed up, and the same problem had manifested itself once again.

He took it anyway for $50 & the schematic.

The Rotel has been humming along nicely as the 2 channel playback system, and I have a Pioneer Elite for the home theater.

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I have a pair of Yamaha P2100 power amps (passively cooled 100 WPC stereo PA amps) that I got back in 1978 or so, and they finally died a couple years ago. Got my money's worth out of those workhorses!

 

How about that; there's a Yamaha RX-V850 for $100. That's 20 yrs old but might be worth a try.

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I would highly also recommend the Yamaha RX 770. 70 Watts a side...it can do anything.

 

My other workhorse receiver is a Nakamichi SR-2a. Lower power but great sound.

 

By the way I am looking for a home stereo amp with a graphic equalizer if anyone knows of one. I want to use it for a lightweight clone set up , and I am a big fan of using EQ on organ clones....most of them seem to need it!

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I played Nord in the store more than a decade ago and found it fun to get some analog sounds easier than on at the time my TG500, and more recently on headphones which sounded ok, but I don't know why the comparison except when some _special reason_ exists outside of the better musicians being thrilled for one or more reasons. The other week on an I7 notebook I played some 192kHz converted CDs which sounded pretty good on the built-in B&O speakers (which for the power was a bargain but had the B&O anyhow), and after listening to them for hours over some time I know they are sensitive to certain types of waves which may have been popular on their stereos too.

 

For serious electronics DIYers it would be fun to built your own amp, but in these days Conrad (the german co., I don't know if that is in the US) and others treat many electronics parts as if they are some exclusive brand, price-wise. Maybe that's the same trend?

 

Seriously I used to check the specs, some power, not too low damping factor (not important for the OPs application), fequency range (often good) and the bottom line if you don't want whistles and bells: the harmonic and (transient) intermodulation distortion. If those are all good the amp should be good too. At Conrad there's even hundreds of watts with decent (not up to my par but for a side hifi fine) specs QSC available which could have other roles as well for only a few hundred I think. Might be a consideration, that will give enough output voltage for the house wires for sure and won't sound bad. How about a teenage Tandy/Radio Shack amp, that's gone from holland since the 80s but judging from their site is still fine for such idea in the US.

 

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Another vote for Yamaha here. I have an RX-V393 that lives in my practice room that I bought in '98 that still works flawlessly. When I went to replace it in the living room I ended up with another Yamaha (HTR-5930). You can easily find an RX for $100.
Instrumentation is meaningless - a song either stands on its own merit, or it requires bells and whistles to cover its lack of adequacy, much less quality. - kanker
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I've had a Sherwood for quite some time - good bang fit the buck. There's one for $100 on the Parts Express link above.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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$100 gives you many options with older hi-fi. I've seen vintage top of the line Onkyo and Pioneer Elite receivers going within your budget, but you might be minus the remote or deal with some battle scars :D . My preference would be either a Sony ES or mid-range Denon, yet the Yammys are fine. Good luck!

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