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JS Bach G Minor Fugue for Organ - Multi-tasking!


AnonymousInvent

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Hans Andre Stamm playing JS Bach (1685-1750) on a great organ built by Heinrich Gottfried Trost (1681-1759) in Walterhausen, Germany. It took Trost 20 years to build the organ! If you watch nothing else go to 3:00 minutes and watch for 30 second for the footwork, along with the two hands that over it. Bravo Mr. Stamm!

Anonymous Inventions

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Same player, same organ, but my favorite: the triple fugue in Eb Major ("St. Anne's Fugue"). He plays it at least twice as fast as I am capable of.

 

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4t10hWcGwc&feature=related

 

When the pedal makes its final entrance blasting the 32' stop near the end I get goosebumps every time I play or hear it.

Moe

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Wonderful posts mate stubb and iLaw. JS Bach is my all time favorite composer. I wish we had a video of him playing his own compositions. But, that being impossible, Herr Stamm is probably the best substitute we could ask for. A wonderfully, painstakingly crafted instrument, played by an exceptionally gifted performer of a composition by one of the world's best composers. I am truly humbled. Thanks for the posts, I enjoyed them!

Anonymous Inventions

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Hearing the P&F in Cm with a bright registration from the get-go is a bit unexpected, and the sharp (A=465?) tuning of the organ sounds strange to me. Great organist, but I can't say I'm crazy about his registrations for that piece. I've never heard anyone do it that way before...

 

TP

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Todd A. Phipps

"...no, I'm not a Hammondoholic...I can stop anytime..."

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I'm presuming that the age of the instrument means the action is directly coupled. Anyone who's ever played such an action will be even more impressed with the fluidity of this guy's performance. Thanks for brightening up my Saturday morning, guys.

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yup, that's a tracker, with mechanical coupling between the manuals. The guy's got monster technique.

 

Want to be blown away, check out Daniel Roth at St. Sulpice in Paris, lots of vids. Mechanical-action Cavaille-Coll organ with Barker lever assist for the manuals. Only thing electric is the blower.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEzadkak0m8 - here he plays the Allegro from the 6th Symphony by Charles-Marie Widor, on the very organ at which Widor was titulaire. Amazing stuff...

 

TP

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Todd A. Phipps

"...no, I'm not a Hammondoholic...I can stop anytime..."

http://www.facebook.com/b3nut ** http://www.blueolives.com

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After you've checked out Widor, look up some bits by Jehan Alain and Olivier Messiaen and prepare to have your mind absolutely blown.

 

Alain's "Litanies", "Choral Dorien," "Trois Danses," and "Premiere Fantasie" are amazing, as are Messaien's "Apparition de l'Église Éternelle" and "Le Banquet Celeste".

 

TP

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Todd A. Phipps

"...no, I'm not a Hammondoholic...I can stop anytime..."

http://www.facebook.com/b3nut ** http://www.blueolives.com

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I'm familiar with Messiaen from my studies in composition and from listening to him since then. But, I haven't concentrated on his works for organ. Since he was an organist, I probably should do so:-) Jehan Alain is new to me. Thanks for referring me to some great French composers for organ! Merci encore!

Anonymous Inventions

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Since he hasn't been mentionned, I feel like I have to add Cesar Franck to the list of French organists to check out. (Though born in Belgium, and of German ascendant) IMHO he is equalled only by the great J.S.B. Sadly most versions I find on Youtube fall short from reflecting the beauty of his compositions. Among others, I suggest "Prélude, fugue et variation" and Choral en mi (#1).

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Franck's Am chorale (#3) is another one. He wrote the three chorales shortly before he died, and one can almost hear in the 3rd a man wrestling with his fate (at least I get that sense from it, YMMV.) I have a recording of Marie-Claire Alain (sister to composer Jehan Alain, she is still performing today) playing the piece, and it leaves me speechless and in tears practically every time I hear it. Just a powerful piece. His Piece Heroique is another one of his famous works, and is a good one for showing off the hi-fi. :D The 2nd chorale (Bm) is very well-known as well. I too can't believe I forgot Franck, he was my introduction to French composers.

 

One time-honored tradition in French organ playing is the art of improvisation. Notre Dame de Paris titulaire Olivier Latry is a master at it, and takes themes from the audience when giving concerts and improvises a piece based on it. He even did it when someone threw the Simpsons theme at him. :D Here's the master in action improvising an introit to the Mass using the theme from the chant they will be using:

 

First, let's hear the chant upon which he based his improv:

 

 

Now, here's his introit. Fasten your seatbelts!

 

 

Brilliant, no?

 

TP

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Todd A. Phipps

"...no, I'm not a Hammondoholic...I can stop anytime..."

http://www.facebook.com/b3nut ** http://www.blueolives.com

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Wow, what a thread! I've actually performed the Franck "Piece Heroique" on a 100-rank pipe organ, it was a rush to say the least! I wish I would have kept up my classical studies from college, now I just mostly play church hymns/offertories and rock stuff on my Hammonds. Most of the French organ music just doesn't work on a B-3! Not enough manuals/pedals! Bach on the other hand. . .

 

a link to the Am Chorale that B3Nut mentioned. I've never heard it before, great stuff!

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1) I don't see how you organists keep everything together - multitasking!

 

2) Jean Langlais - I love his works! "Neuf Pièces" particularly "Chant de Paix", but am still listening to much more. And he was blind! Thanks for the post mate stubb!

 

Jean Langlais - Chant de Paix

 

3) Jehan Alain - Yes, "Choral Dorien" and "Suite" I like. Still checking out others.

 

4) Messiaen - What I expected. Have always liked his contrast of dissonance with glaring consonance. And, TP, for the piece "Apparition..." you mentioned, how slow can a tempo be!

 

Thanks for the posts everyone.

Anonymous Inventions

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