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Perhaps OT: Woodstock the movie


Richard W

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Over the last week, I've slogged through the director's cut of "Woodstock" (recorded from a broadcast on the Palladia music channel), all 3+ hours of it. Couple of observations:

--No tattoos.

--Very few overweight people.

--Funniest "it ain't like that anymore" scene: kids lined up at a bank of pay phones to call home.

--A little disappointed to realize that the film's director rearranged the order of performers. For example, in the film Sha Na Na appears in the first half hour. In reality, they performed right before Jimi Hendrix (!), who ended the show. Many other switches as well.

--Maybe a few thousand people actually remained to see Hendrix's performance.

--Best performance (IMO)--Santana performing Soul Sacrifice, although I could have done without the drum solo.

 

 

 

 

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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Santana's drummer did look like a child. It's amazing to think that Santana has had hit records in every decade since the 60s. What other rock performers can make that claim?

 

I remember when I first saw the film in theaters--as was probably 12--I said to myself "Joe Cocker is a good singer, but it's a shame he's a spastic."

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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Some other observations.

 

Woodstock wasn't a very good film and it wasn't a very good concert. Many groups complained of a bad sound system. The WHo, CSN&Y could not hear their vocals and it sounds like it.

 

I agree with Santana, though I felt Joe Cocker was the best performance.

 

LOTS of crappy bands. Hendrix played at 6 am and most people had left. Coincidentally, I saw Hendrix at Randalls Island where he went on last at about 4 am and I LEFT!

 

Sha Na Na are hardly an example of the music movement at the time. They were a novelty act spoofing 50's music. It's interesting to note, that the songs they performed were only about 10 years old. That would be like a band playing songs by Nirvana today as nostalgic parody.

 

Woodstock is infamous in that it was an event that symbolized the youth movements ability to congregate in peace. This, of course, a few months before the murders at the Stones Alamont concert.

 

Paul Simon is the only artist to have a top 20 album in 4 different decades. He actually did it in 5 different decades.

 

JAZZ UN-STANDARDS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vE4FoJ4Cr4&feature=related

 

DON'T FEAR...THE REVERB! 60's Instrumentals with MORE BASS!

 

 

 

 

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AT 3+ hours, its a long film, and not all of the bands sounded that great. My personal favorite is Ritchie Havens. Joe Cocker and Band were really great, I forget the bass player's name, but his style definitely influenced me.

"Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you cannot play upon me.'-Hamlet

 

Guitar solos last 30 seconds, the bass line lasts for the whole song.

 

 

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Agree on the best performance, but I actually liked the drum solo.

 

I can always do without the drum solo. And, as a bass player, the bass solo is a close second as to most annoying. Unless it says something musically. Shredding a bunch of notes on the bass is rarely musical. And thats what I'm used to hearing... shredding.

 

I enjoy the Woodstock era talent. Joe Cocker, Santana. Even the Grateful Dead - even though they had a rough night.

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Woodstock wasn't a very good film and it wasn't a very good concert. Many groups complained of a bad sound system. The WHo, CSN&Y could not hear their vocals and it sounds like it.

 

I agree with Santana, though I felt Joe Cocker was the best performance.

 

LOTS of crappy bands. Hendrix played at 6 am and most people had left. Coincidentally, I saw Hendrix at Randalls Island where he went on last at about 4 am and I LEFT!

 

Sha Na Na are hardly an example of the music movement at the time. They were a novelty act spoofing 50's music. It's interesting to note, that the songs they performed were only about 10 years old. That would be like a band playing songs by Nirvana today as nostalgic parody.

 

Woodstock is infamous in that it was an event that symbolized the youth movements ability to congregate in peace. This, of course, a few months before the murders at the Stones Alamont concert.

 

Paul Simon is the only artist to have a top 20 album in 4 different decades. He actually did it in 5 different decades.

 

Good call, re Paul Simon.

 

The film wasn't bad, but maybe I'm just saying that because of the nostalgia factor. The constant split screen imagery gets a little tiresome after a while. I know a number of bands refused to have their performances included in the film, such as CCR and Mountain.

 

I'm not sure Woodstock, the event, really proved anything one way or the other. It was the first event of its kind to sink into public consciousness, which probably accounts for its place as a cultural touchstone.

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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Biggest miss on the director's part? Leaving out Mountain's performance. By the way, if you were looking for overweight people...

 

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQHUwS03l1c

 

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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-- For example, in the film Sha Na Na appears in the first half hour.

 

Okay this has puzzled me forever -- WHY was Sha Na Na at Woodstock?

This was begging for a Simpsons quote!

 

Abe Simpson (at Woodstock, watching Hendrix): "Booooh! Bring on Sha Na Na!"

 

Unfortunately I couldn't find it in English, but here it is anyway:

 

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-przmVe-rOc

"Of all the world's bassists, I'm one of them!" - Lug
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I read the other day that CCR was one of the headliners at Woodstock but that it's largely forgotten because John Fogerty wouldn't approve of using CCR in the movie. Apparently their performance wasn't up to his standards.

 

Maybe the best performance was from Richie Havens, considering Richie Havens made up that song Freedom on the spot.

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Maybe the best performance was from Richie Havens, considering Richie Havens made up that song Freedom on the spot.

I don't know ZZ. I always thought that was a very overrated rather than magical performance.

 

Stretching Stretching

Stretching Stretching

Stretching Stretching

Stretching Stretching

 

Sometimes I feel like the next act ain't ready

Sometimes I feel like the next act ain't ready

Sometimes I feel like the next act ain't ready

I'm a long way from done

 

I got a stagehand on my left

And I keep glancing over his way

He keeps signalling me to stretch

Do I gotta keep this up all day?

 

Oar somethin' like that...

Push the button Frank.
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Even if he was stretching, Havens's other songs are great. He has one of the best, and most unique voices.

"Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you cannot play upon me.'-Hamlet

 

Guitar solos last 30 seconds, the bass line lasts for the whole song.

 

 

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the funniest thing about Havens' performance is seeing him use his massive thumb to make bar chords. Pretty sure that's a technical no-no.

 

Hendrix did the same thing all the time. It's only technically wrong if you're hung up on technicalities.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Yes, what's technically right and wrong depends on what you're trying to do. I don't play grabbing strings with my left hand thumb often, but for some chords it's essential. Chris Proctor, the great fingerstylist, uses it sometimes to free up more left hand fingers for embellishments.

 

Was it technically correct for Wes Montgomery to use his right hand thumb to pick with? Does anybody CARE??

 

Re: Woodstock - more about nostalgia than great music, though I enjoyed the film at the time. I don't think it documents most of the artists at their best. It was remarkable mostly for the vast number of attendees. But the technology of the time was not up to it.

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Hendrix did the same thing all the time. It's only technically wrong if you're hung up on technicalities.

 

Chris Squire too. I guess it's only a technical problem if it doesn't work. I was just sort of marveling at the size of Haven's thumb.

 

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0XPgE2JPOM

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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Richie Havens is one of my favorite parts of the movie. I always felt that if you wanted to wear a hole in a guitar, he is your man. Legend had it, he was terrified to go on first but he was the only one ready that didn't need amplifiers, which weren't ready. Many artists said that they weren't so stressed out by the size of the crowd but performing in front of the other bands was another story.

 

The movie kind of cements the idea of the peace and love elements of the 60's. Actually when they say "the 60's" they usually mean 65-74, in my opinion. You had "The Summer of Love", which was about a four week period of 1967 in San Francisco, and Woodstock in 1969. Aside from that, there wasn't a whole lot of peace and love between the Vietnam war, fights for racial equality, assassinations and other things.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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The movie kind of cements the idea of the peace and love elements of the 60's. Actually when they say "the 60's" they usually mean 65-74, in my opinion. You had "The Summer of Love", which was about a four week period of 1967 in San Francisco, and Woodstock in 1969. Aside from that, there wasn't a whole lot of peace and love between the Vietnam war, fights for racial equality, assassinations and other things.

 

I agree. I tell my kids "the 60s" started, in the States, when the Beatles arrived in 1964 and ended in 1973 when the US started leaving Viet Nam. I also tell them that, as savage as the political atmosphere is in the US today, it was a lot worse in "the 60s."

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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The movie kind of cements the idea of the peace and love elements of the 60's. Actually when they say "the 60's" they usually mean 65-74, in my opinion. You had "The Summer of Love", which was about a four week period of 1967 in San Francisco, and Woodstock in 1969. Aside from that, there wasn't a whole lot of peace and love between the Vietnam war, fights for racial equality, assassinations and other things.

I agree. I tell my kids "the 60s" started, in the States, when the Beatles arrived in 1964 and ended in 1973 when the US started leaving Viet Nam. I also tell them that, as savage as the political atmosphere is in the US today, it was a lot worse in "the 60s."

I always used a similar timeline, when the Beatles met Dylan to Watergate. I wasn't born until 71 so what do I know anyway.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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