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We don't talk about sampling very much...


Sundown

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It's a powerful technology, and I'm surprised that it doesn't come up more often in discussions. There are plenty of threads about commercial libraries or ROMplers, but not much dialog about recording your own samples or creating new sounds.

 

I wouldn't typically sample a complex instrument like a piano (I would rely on a pro library for that), but there are so many other use cases (e.g. odd percussion samples, etc.).

 

So do you ever record your own samples? Or walk around the house with a microphone and capture new sounds?

 

Sundown

 

Working on: The Jupiter Bluff; They Live, We Groove

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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I used to record road noises. I once recorded the priest's chanting (Easter) from a church across the street from my balcony. And i put this sample in one of my group's song in our 2nd CD. But i don't do much sampling anymore.
Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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did sample a bit earlier but I enjoy playing so much.....

 

Got an sp 555 a few years back which I used for triggering samples live, we used to glide over from a sample of cantaloupe island into playing it ourselfs as an intro also I used to start some strange noises etc. I did also sample the band as we wen't along and let the continue after we have played as a funny effect. Now it rarely get used....except for my kids having techno party recording and playing around with it.

 

 

 

 

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Back in the old hood, there is a factory that has a couple of friction presses that I think would make for good sampling. They have a bull wheel in the center, with a shaft that acts like a screw, the bull wheel sits between to drive wheels that drive it one way or the other. All the wheels are about 40" in diameter. the bull wheel drives a ram that pounds dry clay into a flat plate. The machine and it's saftey devices are controlled by pnuematics. while the drive wheels are belt driven by a about a 30 hp motor. When in operation it is very rythmic and leathal sounding. I would think It would take a good operator and at least four mikes to pickup everything.

Triton Extreme 76, Kawai ES3, GEM-RPX, HX3/Drawbar control, MSI Z97

MPower/4790K, Lynx Aurora 8/MADI/AES16e, OP-X PRO, Ptec, Komplete.

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It's a powerful technology, and I'm surprised that it doesn't come up more often in discussions.

 

Seriously? You're surprised?

 

Frankly, with the vast majority of keyboard players out there being preset jockeys, and with the absolutely overwhelming quantity of free and commercial libraries available (i.e. the Freesounds site), why would anybody need to do their own sampling?

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I hear you Sven, but there is still so much more that can be done.

 

I'm working on creating a dead area of my control room for recording vocals and voice-over work, and once that's complete, I think I'll be doing more sampling. If you record something that has small room ambience in it, it's hard to compress it and raise the level without hearing the small room (which makes it difficult to "glue" into a mix). But I'm hoping I can create some new percussion sounds once that's complete (within a few weeks).

 

I do sample from TV or movies on occasion, and I'd like to start experimenting with re-sampling (e.g. stacking various synths and capturing them as one sample).

 

If you can hear it, chances are you can sample it and play it, and who knows how great it might sound if you process it through transposition, filters, effects, etc.

 

Sundown

 

Working on: The Jupiter Bluff; They Live, We Groove

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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I owned an EMax back in the day, and spent a lot of time sampling. Setting up key maps, multiple velocity layers, and finding good loop points is not fun (but my lead chainsaw sound was awesome).

 

 

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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I sampled my Rhodes, twice:

 

http://learjeff.net/sf/sf.html

 

I wrote python scripts to automate the most tedious parts:

* chopping up a long sample session into individual samples

* recognizing each note and putting that info in the file name

* trimming the sample

* creating a key/velocity map from the samples

* assembling the soundfont

 

And it's *still* tedious to get all those samples recorded and nursed through the process. I've also sampled an S90ES and my Ensoniq piano, which would be copyright violations to distribute. I'd like to collect a few more for comparison purposes.

 

I plan to do my Rhodes again someday, too, after revoicing the Rhodes. I wish I had a good piano and the time to try my hand at that.

 

I'd like a good thunder sample. I would have thought that to be easy to find, but when I looked a few years ago, no dice. Riders in the Storm just isn't the same without it!

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In the old days, I used to sample a lot of weird stuff on the S50 and K2000 for my 'serious' (aargh) electronic music. I also did a very intensive sampling session when I sold my Chroma, trying to preserve some of the hard programming work I had made on the Chroma... only to discover that even after extensive reprogramming on the sampler, my Chroma sounds were nearly unusable in that form; they had lost most of their character and playability.

I also tried to sample a few acoustic intruments over the years, just in order to learn about the process, and about sound in general; in particular, I sampled my (now ex-)girlfriend's clarinet; she was a pro player, so I could ask her to play with various inflections, dynamics, attacks, etc. But I never took the time to put together the result of that work in an usable library; more than anything else, it made me aware of how time-consuming that kind of work is. I guess that after that experience, I decided that heavy sampling work is not for me. :)

 

BUT recently, I have noticed that the piano bench I use at school makes a wondrful squeak... I'm thinking of recording it before someone could oil the mechanism, and mangling it on the K2600... I probably won't do it in the end, but I guess my Sampling Spirit is still alive somehow... :D

 

 

 

 

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The only time i've messed with it was when i got some mellotron samples into my triton, everything was set up and sounding good, but then i realized i needed 5 or 6 floppy discs (It's the old version) to save and run it, and would have to do that every time, i gave up.
"The purple piper plays his tune, The choir softly sing; Three lullabies in an ancient tongue, For the court of the crimson king"
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The only time i've messed with it was when i got some mellotron samples into my triton, everything was set up and sounding good, but then i realized i needed 5 or 6 floppy discs (It's the old version) to save and run it, and would have to do that every time, i gave up.

 

Looping original samples was annoying as well, but yeah... that endless floppy disk thing (with the Triton) turned me off sampling.

 

:taz:

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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Floppy disks! Time to upgrade! :laugh:

 

Actually, my sampling history goes back farther. My first sampler was a Prophet 2002. I sampled my Rhodes and my CP70, so I could play without having to haul so much junk, with a Roland JP10. The Rhodes samples only covered the fundamental and tine chime, with a crossmod patch on the Roland for the bark. It worked surprisingly well for early 90's. The CP70 samples kinda worked, but I couldn't play piano well on the Roland's kb.

 

When I first started using soundfonts in about 2003, it was a challenge with 256M total memory (then 512M on my next laptop).

 

It's nice to have a bit of breathing room with 4G! I never have gotten direct-from-disk to work at all, but other than Gigastudio (a mistake) I've never had a premium sample player.

 

I also might sample my Martin HD28 acoustic guitar, too. All the free guitar sample sets I've found have been no good for my purposes. For example, using the open A and open D for those notes. The open strings should be an octave below for use when desired only.

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I played with sampling in the 90's but came to the conclusion that the professionals who provided commercial samples provided stuff that was a lot better than I could achieve with the EPS.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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I did some sampling with my Ensoniq EPS16+, but it was mostly effects and jokes. For instance, there was an episode of The Simpsons where they put together a huge string of Homer's "d'oh!"s. I recorded that, split the individual d'ohs to keys as well as putting the whole thing on one key. Great for some laughs.

 

I sampled some crowd noise from a live album to use as background in a track that was supposed to have an "arena rock" sound (no, I never released it nor intended to).

 

I suppose if I did some sampling now I'd do it in Logic since the interface should be much easier.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I owned an EMax back in the day, and spent a lot of time sampling. Setting up key maps, multiple velocity layers, and finding good loop points is not fun (but my lead chainsaw sound was awesome).

 

I used the same axe to sample that hair-raising (Moog modular) synth at the beginning of ELP's "Hoedown." Never did get the loop quite right for live performance.... You are correct, not much fun.

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I owned an EMax back in the day, and spent a lot of time sampling. Setting up key maps, multiple velocity layers, and finding good loop points is not fun (but my lead chainsaw sound was awesome).

 

 

Same here. I used every single inch of that machine. Had some really killer samples of my '65 Belair.

9 Moog things, 3 Roland things, 2 Hammond things and a computer with stuff on it

 

 

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I bought an EMU ESI2000 when they were new, and sampled a couple of things - my modular, other synths, but the samples were short due to memory constraints. Also, looping was a hit/miss ordeal without PC software. It was also frustrating not having an easy way to get sounds from the PC into the ESI. I never sampled much with the ESI because of these details.

 

Years later, I bought (and maxed out the memory in) my Triton Extreme, and purchased some PC software for looping samples. I've got some great samples of my Whiteface Odyssey, some of my modular, and some of a Mellotron. Even though I've spent the time to create all of the samples and programs in the Triton, the bother for me is that it takes a long time to load the samples from the CF card.

 

I think the ultimate implementation would be to have the samples saved to non-volatile memory, to where all user-sampled sounds would be available upon powering up the synth. If that were the case, I'd probably use the sounds more often - and I'd be more apt to sample more often. I know there are limits to memory size, but I can still wish!

 

 

 

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I did some sampling with my Ensoniq EPS16+, but it was mostly effects and jokes.

 

I'll admit that I took the world's longest fight scene from "They Live" and chopped up all the groans and hits into individual samples. Given the length of that scene, the key mapping practically covered a full 61-note board. But it's great for laughs, as a lot of my friends are familiar with that B-movie.

 

Sundown

 

Working on: The Jupiter Bluff; They Live, We Groove

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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I did a lot of sampling back in the nineties. A lot. Way too much: 12 hour days on average, day in and day out, for long stretches of time.

 

While the end result was pretty cool for its time, all of my work has been eclipsed and rendered useless by today's current titles.

 

I'm just glad I got paid for most of it. By and large, it was monotonous, tedious, mind-numbing work. 

 

I've sampled occasionally since then, but I'd much rather spend my time writing music. 

 

YMMV. 

 

Best, 

 

Geoff

My Blue Someday appears on Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Amazon

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I'll admit that I took the world's longest fight scene from "They Live" and chopped up all the groans and hits into individual samples. Given the length of that scene, the key mapping practically covered a full 61-note board. But it's great for laughs, as a lot of my friends are familiar with that B-movie.

I'm a big fan of They Live!

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Going all the way back for me would be that I was known in highschool (late 70s early80s) to for instance make a AD converter box myself, paid by the school which worked great for school chemistry data gathering, but I of course would use such things to do (mild 8KHz 8 bi) audio sampling with, and I was besides hardware savvy at home enough with TR80 assembly to make delay lines and more than that with the (for me) available technology.

 

I think currently it becomes relatively clear that sampling and sampling equals two: not many people will be able to use readily available quality mics and ADs to creat great *musically working* samples with, even though since the S10000 or so of course there I'm sure were boatloads of all kinds of samples around.

 

I'm more a fan of on the one side synthesis, and on the other side the way Kurzweil (I mean the man himself) has gone: quality samples + very intelligent processing, because that's one of the few ways which can give unique results not possible or very difficult in other ways.

 

I listened to the Kronos demo from Steve Fortner and thought to myself: it's not just copyright of musical pieces, it's also a matter of talent, practice and then most of all taste which determines where an instrument goes in practice. A great audio sample on XF or kronos or what is there of a nice juicy bass line can work great to get a whole pop band on the map, but what does that prove and what are the downsides ?

 

Theo.

 

P.S. A recent sample activity of mine made a pretty good soundfont of my electric guitar, if somebody wants it, I think it is on my server.

 

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I use sampling much differently these days than I did when I first got my S3000XL. At the time I didn't have a DAW - strictly MIDI sequencing and sampling. The 3000 did 2 tracks of HD recording as well. So I sampled what I could - lots of loops and stuff, and vocals would go on the 2-track HD. But I had enough sampling time, I could to tracks via samples - chopped up and triggered from Performer.

 

These days, it's more or less to get a sound effect or nail a sound that I can't get otherwise. Examples: Gun shot in Wild Wild West, Chick laugh at beginning of Hungry Like the Wolf, Vincent Price talking at the end of Thriller.

 

Sometimes I'll sample another of my keyboards - like the Bass note at the end of Thriller just wasn't doing it for me from the VA in my fusion. My Jupiter 6 was sitting there, and I dialed it up in about 30 seconds (after screwing with my fusion for probably 30 min trying to get it to sound right). So I just sampled that into the fusion.

 

If a sound is isolated on the original mix, I'll just sample it to save time - like Tainted love...the high note and the hits are all easily isolated, so I just sampled them.

 

ON Love shack, when the horns all gliss down - I've heard people do this with pitch bend and it sounds like ass. So I created a sequence, selected a bunch of individual horn sounds, bent some down slightly, all at different PB depths, and glissando'd (is that a word?) most of them down, at different rates, til it sounded like the CD. Then I played that sequence and sampled the whole thing back in. So my horn patch is just a horn patch across the whole keyboard, except that Bb is a sample of the horns doing the bend/gliss down thing.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Now that Dan mentions it, yeah I guess I was doing a bit of sampling when I had my Fantom X7 a few years ago. I'd sample key parts of tunes that were in isolation as well. Beyond that though, not much else. I can still do sampling on my Fantom XR, but decided that no one else but me seemed to notice, so I stopped bothering about a year ago. If we ever do Time again , I have the bells & metronome loop ready to go, but will probably trigger it from the USB port on my S70XS.

What we record in life, echoes in eternity.

 

MOXF8, Electro 6D, XK1c, Motif XSr, PEKPER, Voyager, Univox MiniKorg.

https://www.abandoned-film.com

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I create samples all the time when I'm producing stuff. I'll play some chord in a piano patch or I'll stack strings and horns and create an orchestral hit and then create a sampler instrument in the EXS Sampler. In Logic it's very easy to do.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Sampling was fun back in the 90s/early 00s but playing useable sounds is the shizzle. But, the main reason I still use a KB workstation is for sampling. Never know when I might run across a piece of audio that begs to be manipulated and/or repurposed. ;):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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