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Death by MUZAK


whitefang

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Even with the increased use of satellite radio, there are still some restraunts, big box and department stores that use MUZAK as their ambient sound.

 

Here are a few of the desecrations I've recently heard...

 

"Light My Fire" Not a rehash of the Doors version, but a rework of the Feliciano version with the melody handled by (URP!) PAN FLUTE!

 

"Chelsea Morning" This Joni Mitchell masterpiece was given the "Tijuana Brass" treatment, and sounded closer to the "Dating Game" theme.

 

"Blowin' in the Wind" Harpsichord and muted trombone gave this classic the bone in it's ass.

 

"White Rabbit" Yep! More harpsichord and a flugelhorn (or however it's spelled) covering the melody.

 

"Girl in Your Eye" I couldn't believe my ears! This obscure tune from Spirit's first LP was done entirely with strings!

 

"Different Drum" This Stone Pony Mike Nesmith penned '60's offering was kinda MUZAK to begin with. Pretty much the same except flutes covered Ronstadt's vocals.

 

"Lady in Red" Real strings replaced all synth work, and muted trumpet covered the vocal.

 

I'll get more of these atrocities out to ya as I hear them. I hope someday not to be ABLE to anymore.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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"Light My Fire" Not a rehash of the Doors version, but a rework of the Feliciano version with the melody handled by (URP!) PAN FLUTE!

 

"Chelsea Morning" This Joni Mitchell masterpiece was given the "Tijuana Brass" treatment, and sounded closer to the "Dating Game" theme.

 

"Blowin' in the Wind" Harpsichord and muted trombone gave this classic the bone in it's ass.

 

"White Rabbit" Yep! More harpsichord and a flugelhorn (or however it's spelled) covering the melody.

 

Wow! :D

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I've been lucky, so far - haven't heard any of these, but "Girl In Your Eye"!?! One of my favorite Spirit songs, ever - don't know if I could stand to hear it done 101 Strings-style.

 

OTOH, I was equally surprised when I was walking through a Safeway a while back, and heard Jorma's "Water Song" playing - the original version - over the sound system.

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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Y'know MUZAK actually got started about a century ago...which I guess really means nothing in itself...

 

They got a version of "Whipping Post" yet ?

 

I bet they do; I've heard Kinks songs...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Y'know MUZAK actually got started about a century ago...which I guess really means nothing in itself...

 

They got a version of "Whipping Post" yet ?

 

I bet they do; I've heard Kinks songs...

 

Yeah, but the Kinks were a popular band...

 

Oh, yeah, I remember my point abt MUZAK [TM].

Before radio receivers were common, MUZAK [TM] was the only way to enjoy muzak---or music---while at yer office job.

Now of course, we got Internet poker & a whole wonderful world of diversions...but let's not forget who braved the realm of entertainment technology first !

d=halfnote
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i heard a "chinese" version of "happy together" at a chinese restaurant last week, complete with midi koto..

 

oh my god...

 

In the cheap Pho joints around here, they all play these Vietnamese versions of late 60's pop hits, with verses in either language, and some pretty cheesy arrangements. You have to hear this stuff to appreciate it.

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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The supermarket I worked in as a kid played Top 40 radio, which I found irritating but better than Muzak... and they were knowingly breaking the law: they didn't have a license to broadcast songs administered by BMI, ASCAP, SESAC, etc., so playing the radio is actually a violation of the law. They just figured no one would notice. When you subscribe to the Muzak service that license is covered, and at a reduced rate since it isn't the original performances and mechanical royalties aren't part of it (the musicians have been paid union scale and don't get royalties). They had a Muzak system but just used the radio instead.

 

I have known a lot of bars that said they couldn't afford the BMI and ASCAP licenses for playing music in the bar and they get harassed... agents are sent in undercover to see if they have djs or bands playing covers or are playing cds or the radio or even a TV that might feature music. A few places have hosted live music, beg you not to play any covers, not even recognizable riffs or parts while warming up or whatever, and ask that you donate one of your original cds for play in the club along with a written note saying you give them permission to play it there and waive having your royalties collected from the,

 

That doesn't work, though... they still get court things filed against them. One place just shut the doors. The other added $2 to the door every night to pay for the licensing.

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In a lot of places, Muzak has been replaced by equally insidious smooth jazz which serves the same function without sounding "dated. I used to work in a wine store where they played it nonstop. That experience permanently traumatized me.

 

Did everyone here see It Might Get Loud? The turning point for Jimmy Page was when he was working as a well-paid and in-demand session guitarist. Has doing a Muzak session and couldnt take it anymore - he quit his gig as and joined the Yardbirds and then founded Zep. He claims that a lot of the stuff he did with those bands (playing loud, using a violin bow, and writing songs that changed tempo) was a direct reaction against what he had to do playing sessions.

 

ASCAP and BMI have recently started going after churches, coffee houses and community centers anywhere someone with a guitar might cover a song at some point. As their revenues from recorded music sales have dropped, theyve started scraping the bottom of the barrel.

 

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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This goes back to an issue that came up in another thread - the clubs have to pay BMI/ASCAP, not the bands or DJ's. (I suppose the music publishers realized they were going to have a hard time going after broke touring bands, but anybody who can afford a liquor license presumably has some income.) If you go into your local open mike and do a whole set of Dylan tunes, it won't cost you a dime, but the club better have its licensing in order.

 

It may seem petty, but it's based on a principle of law called "Primary Estoppel" - you have to go after the little guys (small clubs & cover bands) if you want to go after the big guys (bootleggers).

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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The major Newspaper conglomerates recently started a co op that was formed to gather "back-end revenue." As they lose profits from advertising and since they aren't on the cutting edge of web revenue they started suing aggregation sites (places that post a lot of links to news sites, like Drudge Report or Huffington Post) and blogs... because ever though people point back to them for most of the story they can't get the advertising those people are starting to get.

 

A judge just ruled against them, that reposting an article is fair use as when it's credited... and the decision was kind of influenced by the fact that copyright infringement wasn't the real point of the suits, they'd settled on litigation as their new business model, and that's kind of un-American.

 

I dunno,,, the world is changing...

 

I think they should band together and make a site where a billion people pay a low monthly membership - like $15 - and have access to EVERYTHING. The world is changing in that regard. I think the future will depend on making a little of off a great amount of people rather than making a lot off of a small group of people.

 

If anyone has venture capital and wants to start up what I just described, let's talk (ha)

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ASCAP and BMI have recently started going after churches, coffee houses and community centers anywhere someone with a guitar might cover a song at some point. As their revenues from recorded music sales have dropped, theyve started scraping the bottom of the barrel.

 

ASCAP & BMI have never had revenue from record sales. They collect performance fees from broadcast (radio & TV), as well as other venues where copyrighted music is performed, such as concert halls, yoga studios, gyms & restaurants. Performance rights organizations have no involvement with record sales royalties.

Scott Fraser
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Haven't heard any Muzak in a long long time...guess I shopping in the wrong stores or just don't get out enough... :idk

 

Sounds more like you shop in the RIGHT places, bro'!

 

As far as breaking the law by playing the radio over a store PA; The thrift shop my wife frequents plays local stations over their system. They might not be aware of any illegality. The customers really don't give a shit, so they're probably safe.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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A judge just ruled against them, that reposting an article is fair use as when it's credited... and the decision was kind of influenced by the fact that copyright infringement wasn't the real point of the suits, they'd settled on litigation as their new business model, and that's kind of un-American.

 

Litigation as a business model is un-American? now I KNOW I`ve been overseas too long :D

 

So, venture capital you say? here ya go:

http://www.kickstart.org/products/

 

 

I`ve mentioned this before but, I`d be double careful around places that want to use your original material to `avoid copyright issues`. I played regularly at an open mic place back in N.Y.-the host was a pretty well known local music guy who also published a music magazine/newsletter of local/regional events. He usually recorded the open mics and always said he was going to make a compilation-well whatever-that never happened. I also gradually became aware that this person was-how do I put this-kind of an a**hole. Now he has original material of mine and quite a few others, he has copies and we don`t, and we have no control over what he does with it unless it was all legally squared away before we played any of it. I`m not sure about that and I doubt most of the other players were either. It makes me feel sullied in a way I would not recommend.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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OK, so he was the host. Was he also the owner of the venue? If not, you could ask the owner if any legal stuff was squared away, and if not, maybe rquest that recording devices not be allowed during your performance.

 

Unless the owner was in on it somehow...

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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No he was not the venue owner. He strung people along I believe, with the story about putting everybody on a compilation and being vague enough about when that might happen, so that basically people went along wth it. I think if someone had said no recording, they would have just said that`s a condton of being allowed to play and if you balk, no performance. But anyway too late for that now.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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ASCAP & BMI have never had revenue from record sales. They collect performance fees from broadcast (radio & TV), as well as other venues where copyrighted music is performed, such as concert halls, yoga studios, gyms & restaurants. Performance rights organizations have no involvement with record sales royalties.

 

Scott, I thought there was a recent case concerning radio stations and ASCAP/BMI, the issue being that radio stations were not, in fact, paying for the music they broadcast. Have I got this all turned around?

"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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OK, so he was the host. Was he also the owner of the venue? If not, you could ask the owner if any legal stuff was squared away, and if not, maybe rquest that recording devices not be allowed during your performance.

 

Unless the owner was in on it somehow...

Whitefang

 

"Legal stuff" of this sort can only be "squared away" by the significant parties involved and the signing of an agreement.

 

Someone may use material they've gathered but without the proper releases it's still theft.

If someone in a situation like described agreed to allow recording, that would be dependent on a signed agreement.

 

As to the "revenues" of ASCAP, BMI or any PRO, IIRC the first 2,(& maybe SESAC, now) are non-profit orgs.

Doesn't mean they may not have some padding in their budgets but they're not making significant amounts of money the way a record label might.

d=halfnote
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ASCAP & BMI have never had revenue from record sales. They collect performance fees from broadcast (radio & TV), as well as other venues where copyrighted music is performed, such as concert halls, yoga studios, gyms & restaurants. Performance rights organizations have no involvement with record sales royalties.

 

Scott, I thought there was a recent case concerning radio stations and ASCAP/BMI, the issue being that radio stations were not, in fact, paying for the music they broadcast. Have I got this all turned around?

 

I have no idea what this might refer to. Performance rights organizations license the use of their members' creative work to organizations which stand to profit from the dissemination of that work; in this discussion, radio stations. The broadcasters pay a yearly fee to ASCAP & BMI & in return they can play songs on the radio, which increases the value of the commercial spots. So, since the stations are using music to make money, they have to pay the people who made that music, through the performance rights organizations. The PROs have always been about licensing music to broadcasters. BMI stands for Broadcast Music Inc.

 

 

Scott Fraser
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As to the "revenues" of ASCAP, BMI or any PRO, IIRC the first 2,(& maybe SESAC, now) are non-profit orgs.

Doesn't mean they may not have some padding in their budgets but they're not making significant amounts of money the way a record label might.

 

ASCAP & BMI, and SESAC as well, do not sell a product. They collect for others who sell the rights to their intellectual property. They don't have to sell their services, they are already established as the best & only way to get the most return for what artists produce from the people who consume it. So, they don't need to turn a profit to satisfy the owner or stock holders, etc.

 

The majority of what they take in goes to the artists they represent. But they have a lot of money backing them up. A not-for-profit can generate a large amount of money, even pile it up in banks, bonds or stock, as long as they spend it the right way. The folks who work for them aren't volunteers like they are for a lot of the work that goes on in not-for-profit agencies. They get salaries, and because of the legal knowledge an agent for a royalty company would need to be conversant with, my guess is they pay at least as well as any not-for-profit.

 

And, they spend a fair portion of what they charge the artists on collecting those the royalties. No kidding, thos guys will spend $100 to collect a 25 cent fee. They have to. If anybody gets away without paying in any sort of noticeably public way, they're out of business.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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