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Bluesape

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While it strays from the traditional, it seems like it would be easier to work with for the company and shouldn't effect the sound (a trace is a trace). Then again, maybe it's just my computer background shining through....

 

"Old School" design and components are definitive part and parcel of what Gibson is selling with their name unless specifically pointed out as in the "Robot" and "Firebird X" lines. All in all, this is just cheap and cheesy and incongruous.

 

A PCB-mounted jack located on the face of a guitar at a 90º angle- either in wood or on a plastic pickguard- where a 1/4" plug is constantly knocked about is CERTAIN TO FAIL, and quickly.

 

Trying different wiring-schemes (such as the way vintage Gibsons were ACTUALLY wired) and/or upgrading to better and/or more authentic vintage-correct pots and caps is now impossible without cutting traces or tossing the entire PCB and adding the wiring that should have been there in the first place.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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The right thing to do would be to point out the fact they're using this circuit (yea the plug is going to fail) because hobby players like the ol' lefthander may not care but to a pro, well I can see where it's an issue. Honesty really is the best policy.
I was born at night but I wasn't born last night...
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umm...strictly from a tech standpoint...

 

ya get less noise.

 

you can drop a whole board in in literally 1 minute.

 

pickup changes are faster and easier (duncan's doing it too)

 

cuts build time

 

more reliable than ptp that can cook pots and render them useless..

 

just playing devil's advocate here. tonally, there'll be no change other than possibly improvement, as it's rare for gibsons NOT to hum...despite having humbuckers.

 

and the jack, as pictured, is not pcb mounted. it mounts thru the pcb, true, but should be studlier as mounted than the "normal" way.

 

in the end, it'd even be easier to replace parts, as ya don't have to f with the wiring or star ground (if it even has one) and can lift the whole plate out of the cavity to replace any component.

 

to me, it's a win-win for player, company, and tech...just sayin'

 

the only thing likely lost is mojo factor...

 

and that's from the player more than the axe.

 

jmo.

 

:D

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Yeah, it would be a bitch to replace parts. Maybe that's part of what they were thinking. You'd have to buy a whole new board.

 

Or just chuck it and rewire.

 

The right thing to do would be to point out the fact they're using this circuit (yea the plug is going to fail) because hobby players like the ol' lefthander may not care but to a pro, well I can see where it's an issue. Honesty really is the best policy.

 

Yeah; considering that an image and lifestyle-accessory is just as much what Gibson is selling- and charging a premium for- as a musical instrument, it really is less than honest to slip a PCB assembly in there without making the difference very obvious in display, tags and advertising.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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The real question is, did they reduce the price to match the reduced quality?

 

in many ways, it may be IMPROVED quality... from their perspective. more consistency, easier repair, less stuff to go wrong, a more solid construction.

 

it won't adversely affect the tone. so... like i said bro, other than mojo, what's the diff?

 

i agree...they are supposed to be top of the line, hand-made instruments...but to quote the amp guys, you can bet if they had pcb's when leo fender started building amps, you can bet he would have used them.

 

 

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The real question is, did they reduce the price to match the reduced quality?

 

in many ways, it may be IMPROVED quality... from their perspective. more consistency, easier repair, less stuff to go wrong, a more solid construction.

 

it won't adversely affect the tone. so... like i said bro, other than mojo, what's the diff?

 

i agree...they are supposed to be top of the line, hand-made instruments...but to quote the amp guys, you can bet if they had pcb's when leo fender started building amps, you can bet he would have used them.

 

 

And that's where I'm torn. There are pros (it would be easy to provide "kits" where you could swap out the electronics simply by replacing the board) and there would be cons (it is possible that having the jack attached to the board is asking for trouble. Those things move around a lot. Now, who knows, maybe that has been accounted for?).

 

Over all, I would reserve judgment until I saw it for myself. As others have mentioned though, at the very least they should be letting folks know they are doing it. A little sign that said "now with new PCB board!" etc.

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This is not exactly a totally new thing - the Gibson RD Artist guitar and bass made back in the early 1980's used a rather large circuit board that was designed by Bob Moog (at the time, Moog and Gibson were both owned by Norlin).

 

The board gave active electronics, with expander, compressor, and extremely wide range tone controls for both bass and treble. I owned a 1982 RD Artist bass - had a spare board (which was for the guitar - capacitor values were different, but the integrated circuits and transistors were the same), never needed the extra board. Pickups and output jack were connected using Molex connectors. The board was NOT a cheap design, it was a glass-fiber board with heavy traces, very well built (don't know if the new tone controls are that way or not).

 

I bought the bass in 1984 used, sold it in 2010 - never had any problem at all with it during the years in between.

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If ya got active pups, ya can expect a circuit board, but ya have already consciously eschewed the "vintage" cachet in favour of higher gain/lower noise, and so forth. Lotsa players wanna tweak their axes to their own personal specs, be they vintage or over the top. A modern guitar may likely have playabilty advantages we've come to like: Bigger frets(stainless , even!), more frets, more stable bridges and trems, locking tuners, etc., and can serve as a template for tonal experimentation. That design flexibilty is removed here.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Personally I feel the notion of point to point wiring being inherently superior is an extremely questionable idea, other than as an indicator of how hidebound & conservative the electric guitar world is.

 

I felt this way about amps... every tube amp I own has some PCB in it somewhere. But input jacks have failed me... Fender amps being the worst culprits.

 

Then again, my buddies with older PTP wired amps have had more maintenance issues...

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ya know, my 1966 gibson firebird has all the stuff in the control cavity mounted to a brass shield inside the cavity. and that's vintage...and point to point...just sayin' yo. it's really nothing all that new.

 

you're ALWAYS gonna get less noise with a ground plane in my opinion. it comes down to what scott says to me.

 

what's more important...sticking to archaic methods that work, or finding ways to "improve" on the old stuff?

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I agree... but I also agree that input jacks mounted directly on PCBs are trouble. Other than that none of that bothers me... if a guitar was solder-free and used those little screw sockets I'd be happier, personally.
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i somehow suspect it is a cost saver for maximum profit, considering how Gibson wastes no time spelling out each "amazing" detail in their specs for each model like the type of glue, the angle of the headstock etc i wonder why this new method isn't exploited on the website.
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If it saves 10 bucks and works just as well, then Gibby is staying competitive with the knock-offs and imports. I say good for them, they are in business to make a profit after all. I'll bet all the folks who work for Gibson hope they keep working and keep making a profit! Safe to say most of us know somebody out of work. Ahhhhhh crap I'm drifiting into political territory. Pull the skuppers, drag the bippers and bring her hard to port Cap'n!! Sail back on topic!
I was born at night but I wasn't born last night...
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