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Instruments in hot or cold


Nillerbabs

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Hey guys.

 

 

I don't know much about technics, but I know that feeling in the gut. Winter is kicking in in Denmark, with temperatures just below freezing point. A few days ago I left my Nord Lead 2x in the trunk of my mom's car (as long as it's not visible from the outside, our insurance covers it). She dropped it by a few hours ago, and when I started working with it, the knobs were incredibly stiff, almost to the point where I had to use force to turn them. After a short while next to a radiator (but not too close to it, of course), it was back to its old self.

 

Do I jeopardize the very survival of my instruments by leaving them in such cold? I feel rather stupid at the moment. And now that were at it, metal is also affected by changes of temperature - so will I put my cables at risk by running them behind the aforementioned radiator?

 

 

Thanks,

 

Niels

When in doubt, superimpose pentatonics.
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As Kevin said, slow temperatures changes are the way to go. When a device changes temperature the different parts inside will expand at different rates (and amounts). That can cause solder joints to crack. This is more of a problem with modern equipment that uses lead-free solder as it's more brittle.

 

The other thing is that electronics does not like moisture. Rapid temperature change can cause condensation and start corrosion.

 

As for storage, electronics likes similar temperatures to humans.

DigitalFakeBook Free chord/lyric display software for windows.
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If you leave equipment out in the cold, you should allow it to warm up to room temperature before turning it on and playing it. Take care of you instruments and they'll take care of you.

 

What I'd like to know is WHY you left that KB in your mom's car to begin with?? :cop: Its light and portable so there's no reason not to take it out of the car and keep it in a warm house.

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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This is just something that happens and I would deal with it. Especially the Hammond which which stay in the trailer. Used to have to carry a hair dryer because sometimes the generator wouldn't run until you heated it up. Clones are nice.

 

I usually unload 2 hours before we play. Stuff sweats like crazy when you take it out of the cases. I wipe off the outsides but it is what is inside the instruments I worry about.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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It's always the bottom rotor on the Leslie that gives me grief in cold weather. I usually have to give it a spin on high and let it spin for 10 to 15 minutes before it will switch from high to low smoothly

SK2 /w Mini Vent / XK3 Pro System /w 142 Leslie, Roland D70, Korg SP250 B3 1959 (retired) , Porta B (retired), XB2 (retired)

 

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My 860 Leslie started doing something funny last year. I have to run it for about 10 to 15 minutes before the horn would get up to full high speed when it gets cold. I oiled it and the belts looked good. It is only when it gets cold. I have not had any real cold weather yet.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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Leslie's don't run well at all when the temp gets really hot out side, you get a real worbally sound if the temp gets over 110F. I heard this in Singapore and Hong Kong one time. The techs had to pull the mics back and put a couple of bags of ice in front of a fan to blow cooler air on the belt of the lower rotor. Wet heat affects them more than dry does.
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