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PRS MAN

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http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-Tour-TNT-115-Bass-Combo-Amp?sku=582110

 

I want a bass amp that will handle a band and touring and all of that. Personallay i want a Ampeg, Wariwck or Mesa Boogie,b ut i think i can offord this bass amp. ANy one that has the amp or have played itl, please tell me if you what think about this amp. Its 600 watts and all but some people on musician friend says that it was the worst amp ever, so idk plese let kme know your thoughts

_____DISCIPLE_ROCKS_____

PAUL REED SMITH GUITARS 4 EVER

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IT seems like a good deal. Test before buying if you can, but I had a much earlier generation Peavey with a 15" speaker and it really held its own in practice, and was plenty loud in performance.

 

I"m a G-K fan, and though only 200W, this is not a bad amp at all:

Used G-K 150

"Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you cannot play upon me.'-Hamlet

 

Guitar solos last 30 seconds, the bass line lasts for the whole song.

 

 

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http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Line-6-LowDown-LD400-Pro-2x10-400W-Bass-Combo-Amp?sku=520007

 

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Rumble-350-350W-2x10-Bass-Combo-Amp?sku=584203

 

Ok heres some more amps im looking at and thanks BP Island for your input, hopefully somehow i will be able to offord something like these

_____DISCIPLE_ROCKS_____

PAUL REED SMITH GUITARS 4 EVER

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My Peavey experience is mostly from an early eighties Combo 300. It worked great. Stinkin' heavy, but did the job very well. How heavy is the Peavy unit? Class D amp should make it manageable, and 600 watts should be enough to accomodate an extension speaker should the need arise. Like the tilt back feature. Without a test drive, that'd be my pick of the three.

Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.

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IMHO, Peavey gear is extremely reliable.

 

Yep, me too. They don't always sound like a million bux, but they never seem to die early deaths. And, with the passage of time, they may have improved the sound of 'em, too. I haven't spent much time with any of the newer stuff, it may be freakin' wonderful.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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MF reviewers can be a real hit or miss. The main issue is you don't know who is writing it- someone reliable or someone who couldn't write a positive review if their life depended on it.

 

Traditionally Peavey has been a reliable brand. If you can, check around and see if anyone local might have one on the shelf.

 

Doing some digging, there is some fine print to look at. The owner's manual has the 'power consumption' as 600W, the output is 300W @ 8 ohm and 450W @ 4 ohms (w/ extension cab).

 

That's one thing to keep in mind- there is often a difference between what's advertised for watts and what it's actually capable of.

 

As far as the Line 6 and the Rumble, I don't know much about them except it's my impression that the Line 6 you would be buying mostly an array of effects, most of which you probably wouldn't use. The Rumble series might be ok, I haven't had much experience with them. IMHO, the main issue with a lot of the solid state combos is that you can get quite a lot of power for fairly cheap but a lot of them don't have that great of a tone.

 

If you are looking to spend around $500, that should get you a pretty good used rig from Craigslist. There seems to be quite a few good half stacks in that price range.

"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind"- George Orwell
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For the Peavey Tour TNT 115, "Weight Unpacked: 75.18 lb(34.1 kg)". Maybe that's pretty good for a "600 W" combo, but 75 pounds is still 75 pounds to your back. (I assume the kind of touring you're talking about does not include roadies.)

 

Yes, it's simpler to buy a combo; you don't have to worry if this head will work with that cab. OTOH it's not that hard to figure that stuff out.

 

Yes, it's simpler to play through a combo; just plug it into an outlet and plug your bass in and you're ready to go. OTOH some combos are nothing more than a stock head and cab in the same enclosure. What you gain in convenience you pay for in a bulkier, heavier, harder to transport package.

 

For $500 the TNT seems like a good bargain for everything that is packed into one box. And maybe it is. But the weight would make me at least consider other alternatives.

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The GK MB 2x10 is super light and super loud. Great GK tone. With an extension cab it can throw 500 watts out. 350 to the 2 10's. Weighs like 30lbs.

 

I have pushed it hard with no ill effects...that I know of.

 

What part of Maryland are you in PRS MAN? Maybe we could work out a deal for mine. I am not using it at all lately and my heart isn't really into playing that much at the moment.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

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For the Peavey Tour TNT 115, "Weight Unpacked: 75.18 lb(34.1 kg)".

 

 

OMG! Five pounds lighter than my Combo 300!!!!! OUCH!

 

How 'bout the Carvin class D combo entry; the 500 watt one.

Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.

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Yes, it's simpler to play through a combo; just plug it into an outlet and plug your bass in and you're ready to go. OTOH some combos are nothing more than a stock head and cab in the same enclosure. What you gain in convenience you pay for in a bulkier, heavier, harder to transport package.

 

+1 for head/cab vs. combo. I had an Ashdown combo that was "only" 55 pounds but it was bulky and I got real tired real fast of carting it around, especially up stairs. Setup time for head/cab is not much more either, just one extra cable.

"Of all the world's bassists, I'm one of them!" - Lug
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Can someone explain to me how a separate head and cab is easier to lug around then a combo...please?

 

So you lug around a 55lb combo up and down steps or you lug a head and a cabinet up the steps. What is the difference?

 

My old Genz Benz head weighed in at 3 lbs and the Berg cab at 32 lbs. My GK combo weighs 33 lbs but I don't have separate things to carry...not that putting the GBZ head in my gig bag made a difference.

 

So you have the argument of lightweight gear not having good tone. Fine, but then you're back carrying heavy gear.

 

So again, I ask what makes separates, which are just as heavy, easier to lug around?

 

I'm sorry to sound prickish, but I had a bad day at work and am argumentative right now. I think I have the most convenient rig ever...other than one I don't have to carry.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

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PRS Man, if the Peavey works for you both sound and budget-wise? Go for it. Peavey stuff is built pretty well and can hold up to the rigors of gigging pretty well. The only point of concern I would offer is that you need to be mindful of protecting the control plate on the top of the amp. Usually those controls are recessed to protect them. But if there's any kind of cover offered with the TNT 150 I would get that in addition to the amp.

 

Fingertalkin - For me, the seperates thing works. My gig loadout is pretty easy: Bass in the gig bag, messenger bag with cables, sheet music and Eden WTX-500 head (about 4 pounds), and my Eden NEO-112 cab (28 pounds). For me that works. I'm already bringing the messenger bag with the sheet music and cables, and it's easy enough to stick the amp in there too. For me to find a comparable combo amp that's as compact and lightweight as my seperate rig might be a challenge.

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PRS Man, if the Peavey works for you both sound and budget-wise? Go for it. Peavey stuff is built pretty well and can hold up to the rigors of gigging pretty well. The only point of concern I would offer is that you need to be mindful of protecting the control plate on the top of the amp. Usually those controls are recessed to protect them. But if there's any kind of cover offered with the TNT 150 I would get that in addition to the amp.

 

Fingertalkin - For me, the seperates thing works. My gig loadout is pretty easy: Bass in the gig bag, messenger bag with cables, sheet music and Eden WTX-500 head (about 4 pounds), and my Eden NEO-112 cab (28 pounds). For me that works. I'm already bringing the messenger bag with the sheet music and cables, and it's easy enough to stick the amp in there too. For me to find a comparable combo amp that's as compact and lightweight as my seperate rig might be a challenge.

 

I am not arguing the combo vs. separates, just the argument that one is easier to lug than the other.

 

I had the same rig essentially, just different brands as you. I am eluding to the fact that not all combo amps are tanks and not all separates are lightweight. Loading in and out is a pain in the uh....back, so I see no difference in combos vs. separates.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

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I carry gear in to places with either one of these:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41PZKLTsAtL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

 

or one of these:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31FGMSSVpOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

 

It doesn't matter much whether I have a combo or separates, unless there are stairs. Then I do not want to have to carry anything that weighs more than 50 pounds (23 kilos).

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PRS Man, if the Peavey works for you both sound and budget-wise? Go for it. Peavey stuff is built pretty well and can hold up to the rigors of gigging pretty well. The only point of concern I would offer is that you need to be mindful of protecting the control plate on the top of the amp. Usually those controls are recessed to protect them. But if there's any kind of cover offered with the TNT 150 I would get that in addition to the amp.

 

Fingertalkin - For me, the seperates thing works. My gig loadout is pretty easy: Bass in the gig bag, messenger bag with cables, sheet music and Eden WTX-500 head (about 4 pounds), and my Eden NEO-112 cab (28 pounds). For me that works. I'm already bringing the messenger bag with the sheet music and cables, and it's easy enough to stick the amp in there too. For me to find a comparable combo amp that's as compact and lightweight as my seperate rig might be a challenge.

 

I am not arguing the combo vs. separates, just the argument that one is easier to lug than the other.

 

I had the same rig essentially, just different brands as you. I am eluding to the fact that not all combo amps are tanks and not all separates are lightweight. Loading in and out is a pain in the uh....back, so I see no difference in combos vs. separates.

 

I totally get that. Not every amp package works for everyone. It's toally a YMMV situation.

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How 'bout the Carvin class D combo entry; the 500 watt one.

 

40 lbs, don'cha know. And it looks like you can yank the head out of the cab. Can you? Did we talk about this when it first came out?

 

First time I ever quoted myself. I think. Is that legal?

Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.

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How 'bout the Carvin class D combo entry; the 500 watt one.

First time I ever quoted myself. I think. Is that legal?

Back when I was moderating, we'd have cut your strings at the pickup for an offense like that :grin:

 

fingertalkin - Jeremy nailed it for me. My rig is stored in the (finished) basement. I like having lighter individual pieces to carry up and down. Once I'm "outside", I also do what J said - I stack it on a handtruck. That's the only reason I prefer separates. The exception is something like a GenzBenz Shuttle 6 with the 12" cab - that's under 30 pounds, so (if I had one) that would be fine.

 

And for the actual topic, I have found Peavey heavy but reliable and solid with tones I enjoy.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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So again, I ask what makes separates, which are just as heavy, easier to lug around?

 

Others have said it better, but personally it's having the individual pieces that can be lifted into the back of my car easier.

 

Actually, total weight of my current rig is even more than than my combo was! My old school Genz head is 23 lbs (really want a Shuttle...new topic...) and my Avatar cab is 40. However, just the fact that they can be lifted and carried on their own, even if it means more trips, is worth it to me.

 

That said, I absolutely agree that there are several combos that are very light (much less than my head/cab, certainly) and so the generalization isn't really correct.

"Of all the world's bassists, I'm one of them!" - Lug
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Loading in and out is a pain in the uh....back, so I see no difference in combos vs. separates.
My comments were based on my perception that the OP was limiting his choices to combos only, perhaps because he is coming from a guitar background and is not as familiar with bass gear.

 

Hopefully we can all agree that 75 lbs in one box is no joy to transport.

 

You have a great suggestion! A 30 lb combo that comes in less ($300) than the presumed target budget ($500).

 

I was thinking it would at least be better to have a 50 lb cab and a 25 lb head than a 75 lb combo, but I like your suggestion much better.

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Dimensions matter, too, not just weight. Sometimes it's easier to get two slightly smaller pieces of gear into a small trunk (i.e., "boot" for our friends across the pond) or Yugo or taxi or whatever than one large combo. Sometimes one small combo is better for the subway. It is more than once that I've seen a bassist with a URB and a small GK MB combo on the subway in NYC.

 

Ya feel me?

 

Peace.

--SW

 

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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