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steve vai crybaby?


majax

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Hmn, do you mean, when Steve Vai uses a wah-wah effect (generally just referred to as "wah")?

 

Typical wah effects are done with a wah pedal, an electronic/analog filter effect, that is a little like the accelerator-pedal in an automobile; toe-forward/pressing down, accentuates the high-treble; heel-down/pulling back, the low-bass is accentuated. Moving the pedal back and forth produces a somewhat vocal, vowelly kind of sound effect, as the pedal passes through the range of the filter.

 

Somewhat similar but less dramatic wah effects can be had by manipulating the tone-control knob on an electric guitar.

 

And there are also effects-pedals called envelope-filters, that do the wah-effect automatically based on the strength of the attack of given notes, shifting to the bassier tones as the note's envelope fades, only to be kicked full-up bright again upon the attack of the next note. This way, the effect is "touch sensitive", controlled by your picking dynamics.

 

 

I believe that Steve Vai uses a wah pedal, that is connected in-between his guitar and amp; he apparently used a modified Dunlop Crybaby wah on some of his best known, earlier music, such as "The Audience Is Listening" on his album, Passion And Warfare.

 

Currently, Vai most likely uses his signature Bad Horsie wahs from Morley; there are two models, the original Bad Horsie VAI-1, and the Bad Horsie 2 VAI-2. A friend of mine has a Bad Horsie, and it's an excellent wah.

 

 

Personally, I prefer my Fulltone Clyde Deluxe wah, which in my humble opinion is the best wah made. I bought mine used on e-Bay a few years ago, cleaned it up, did a little typical maintenance on it, tweaked its various controls to my liking, and it's just perfect. On top of that, they're built incredibly well- some of the toughest, most heavy-duty pedals in the business.

 

 

I also have a DigiTech GNX4, which has a built-in pedal that can be assigned to control a digital-model of a wah-pedal; it's OK, but frankly, it pales in comparison to he real thing in a side-by-side face-off; I'd rather use a Crybaby, Morley Bad Horsie, or- especially- my Clyde Deluxe, connected in front of the input of the GNX4.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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as Caevan said, what exactly do you mean? Are you talking about when he makes the guitar whimper? it's a mixture of wah and vibrator-bar being pulled down a lot. It's not too hard once u get used to the feel of a floating.

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Two years ago, Guitar Player put out a holiday issue that spotlighted the stage rigs of I believe fifteen different guitarists, including Steve Vai. The Morley Bad Horsie Wah pedal was nowehere to be found, but the Dunlop Crybaby was right there. Does that answer the question?
I rock; therefore, I am.
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as Caevan said, what exactly do you mean? Are you talking about when he makes the guitar whimper? it's a mixture of wah and vibrator-bar being pulled down a lot. It's not too hard once u get used to the feel of a floating.

 

Good point- he uses a lot of whammy-bar along with the wah-pedal, not to mention his prodigious fretboard skills...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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