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Inear monitoring


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I tried in ear monitoring yesterday on a rehearsal and i think i like it.

The volume tends to get a bit too high when we practice so the piano-sound gets hard and unpleasant through my Peavey Pr12p's.

 

My keys goes into a small mixer. Main out from that to (my Peavey's when rehearsal) and FoH in concert. Control room out to another small 'monitor mixer'. To be able to hear the band i put one omni mic in the middle of the room which went into the monitor mixer together with a feed from the guitarist through a Palmer PDI09 ( who tends to be too quiet at times!) on their separate channels.

Earphone out to a Fisher Amps mini powerpack and to Hearsafe HS4 drivers which plugs straight in to my Etymotic Musicians Ear Plug instead of the filters.

 

So now i can mix my keys, the overall band and the guitarist to a level and balance i am comfortable with.

It worked quite good. My keys sounded great. I could hear everything much better than before and i can decide the total volume to my ears. :)

 

I will try it on a concert next week. It's in a concert hall which can get a bit muddy and 'boomy' on stage. I will probably get rid of that in my hearing.

 

Hans

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I had to google the Get Down comment... :)

 

I tried in ear monitoring in concert yesterday and it was a mixed experience. On the positive side, I could hear myself and the other instruments well (after getting through the soundcheck) and my keys sounded good.

 

On the negative side is the dependance on a really good monitormix from the soundman since very little of the stage sound gets to my ears.

I felt a bit uneasy with the experience. A bit 'detached' from the whole thing but I think I will get used to it.

 

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I've heard it takes some getting used to, but you might see if you can find ways to improve it. Overall, I think it's a better way to go when you have a regular gig.

 

Get down! ;)

 

P.S. I wish I could read your blog, but I don't understand a word, except the few that are in English.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I've heard it takes some getting used to, but you might see if you can find ways to improve it. Overall, I think it's a better way to go when you have a regular gig.....

+1

 

It took me a few gigs to get comfortable with IEMs, especially with feeling detached/isolated (as you mentioned), but ambient mikes can help in this regard. Using IEMs sort of reminds me of being in a studio, in terms of having everything dialed in the way you want it. With IEMs, I've never heard my keys sound better in a live monitoring situation..but we had a rather sophisticated monitor board, so keep in mind this can moderate your experience. The nice thing is that once your mix is set to your liking, it's a consistently favorable experience from job to job. Hang in there!

 

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I will try with an ambient mike next time. I have a small omni condenser that will work nicely i think. This was our 3rd concert and our 3rd soundman. And all within a tight budget so no separate monitor mixer. All mixing is done at the main desk but i think we will have the same soundman the next time which is good. He did a good job.
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I have a moderate case of tinnitus, and loud noise/music makes it worse. My biggest fear is that someday I'll encounter a REALLY LOUD sound, and my ringing will go from annoyance to suicidal levels. The in-ear monitors seem like a great way for that to happen.
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I have a moderate case of tinnitus, and loud noise/music makes it worse. My biggest fear is that someday I'll encounter a REALLY LOUD sound, and my ringing will go from annoyance to suicidal levels. The in-ear monitors seem like a great way for that to happen.

 

Yeah, even though they don't sound great and I wish they had another pair of channels, I still like the Hearback systems because they have a built-in limiter you can adjust the threshold on. If I don't know and trust the soundman, I keep that limiter threshold nice and low until just before downbeat. Otherwise, my ears don't go in until someone asks me to plug them in, and if there's any talk or other indication that something might get repatched, I unplug immediately. Getting blasted by wedges because of a soundcheck snafu is one thing, but in-ears can be downright dangerous if the soundman isn't very aware of what's going on in his rig and what he's sending down those lines at all times.

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...in-ears can be downright dangerous if the soundman isn't very aware of what's going on in his rig and what he's sending down those lines at all times.

 

I take a slightly different approach that to a large degree buffers my ears from an clumsy soundman.

 

My IEM transmitter is mounted in my keyboard rack along with my keyboard mixer. I receive an "Aux Send" mix from the FOH board with everything except keyboards which is run into a channel strip on my keyboard mixer. I in turn control the mix of keys and the monitor mix I receive from the FOH board - at my keyboard mixer - routing an Aux send from my keyboard mixer to the IEM transmitter.

 

The FOH engineer might inadvertently spike the send coming into my board - however because I have direct control of the last 5 point of gain control points in the signal chain (the IEM bodypack, the IEM transmitter input gain, the Aux output, the channel strip Aux mix and the channel strip gain) m controlling the input gain, the mix and most importantly, the overall output being sent to the IEM transmitter (all of which I keep very much in what I consider a low volume range) - the resulting spike that ultimately makes it to my IEM body pack is essentially distortion of an overdrive channel strip - and not raw volume.

 

Sure ... a screwup on the FOH engineer's part results in it getting a little louder - but nothing that's going to take my head off.

 

I went with this atypical setup because I wanted to be able to use my IEMs even when the folks I'm playing with aren't really set up to support them. As long as I can get a functional mix of the rest of the band from the FOH board - I'm good to go with my IEMs.

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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I went with this atypical setup because I wanted to be able to use my IEMs even when the folks I'm playing with aren't really set up to support them. As long as I can get a functional mix of the rest of the band from the FOH board - I'm good to go with my IEMs.

 

Great setup, and if I used IEMs more often I would probably do something similar. I generally only use IEMs in situations where the nature of the venue requires everyone to do so (usually churches or casinos... funny how much those gigs can have in common).

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[Great setup, and if I used IEMs more often I would probably do something similar. I generally only use IEMs in situations where the nature of the venue requires everyone to do so (usually churches or casinos... funny how much those gigs can have in common).

 

These days, I'm bummed if I find myself in a situation where I can't use my IEMs.

 

It only took me a handful of gigs with my IEMs to recognize that I don't ever want to go back to "moving air" for my stage monitoring. I've never heard my keys so clearly and accurately (without turning the stage into a volume war!) as I do in my IEMs. I typically play on small stages - meaning that cymbal "wash" is a constant problem even with drummers who play with good dynamics and volume control - simply because of the proximity. The noise rejection of my ear buds (advertised as 26db) means that the cymbal wash pretty much disappears from the mix - leaving me to play with the bass player, guitar player and vocals - quietly no less!

 

The 85% of my gigs that are with my usual bands that use my PA to start with - which I've got set up to support this approach. The 15% of my gigs that are sub gigs with others .. I don't have to be a bother to the engineer. If there's an unused Aux Send (and there has been every time so far!) - just send me a parallel mix with whatever vocal mix is being sent the wedges plus a smidgeon of bass and a smidgeon of guitar and I'm good to go!

 

Because none of the folks I play with are "all IEM" bands - I still bring my stage amplification so that they can hear me on stage. However, I set it up - and then point the nearest guitar player to the volume knob and tell him to set it wherever he wants it. What I hear is solely my IEMs.

 

It eliminates me from contention for volume in the sonic spectrum on stage - while letting me hear 'zactly what I want to hear. Best of all I no longer leave gigs with that dull ringing in my ears.

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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We are ALL IEM, and I think that's the best solution - especially since we're mostly direct. To tell the truth, I don't think I would want any more ambient than the bleed we already get through the vocal mics.

 

But SpaceNorman's approach is interesting and seems like a nice way to work with those situations. We have our own monitor mixer and a splitter snake. So FOH just does FOH. Each band member is in charge of his/her own IEM mix. That only works if you're ALL IEM. But it works great for us and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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...in-ears can be downright dangerous if the soundman isn't very aware of what's going on in his rig and what he's sending down those lines at all times.

 

I take a slightly different approach that to a large degree buffers my ears from an clumsy soundman.

 

My IEM transmitter is mounted in my keyboard rack along with my keyboard mixer. I receive an "Aux Send" mix from the FOH board with everything except keyboards which is run into a channel strip on my keyboard mixer. I in turn control the mix of keys and the monitor mix I receive from the FOH board - at my keyboard mixer - routing an Aux send from my keyboard mixer to the IEM transmitter.

 

That is very much like I do it too but I use a wired system and a small mixer for monitor. I use 3 channels (it will be 4 with the ambient mike) in that mixer. At one time during the soundcheck the guitarist hit a switch and it went almost painfully loud.

So I think I will need to put a limiter in the chain somewhere. I believe Shure has a body pack for wired systems with built in limiter.

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