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Come on Eileen


Eric Jx

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I know there are a number of other members of 80s bands on this forum. I'm sure most of you play "Come on Eileen".

Our band is just started working on it tonight.

 

My question is what do your band do to cover the banjo part?

 

I'm obviously covering the fiddles, piano, and accordian parts.

 

I figure the guitarist has got to do something to cover the banjo part, but I can't imagine anything coming out of his amp sounding anything like a banjo.

 

If he had a mandolin, I best that would be a decent proxy.

 

I'm curious what he's going to come up with for next week.

 

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In my old band (also and 80's band) our guitar player had one of those Line6 Modeling guitars that did a banjo sound - pretty cool.

 

This band, our guitar player sings it, and pretty much plays along with the banjo part, but there's a sequenced banjo part.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Being an 80's tribute band, I think "come on eileen" is almost required material. Same with "love shack" and "99 Red Balloons"

 

 

I'll have to see if Line6 has an effect box that does that Banjo model.

 

Or maybe I can convince my guitarist to sell one of the 8 guitars he owns that all sound the same, and replace one with a Variax.

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I don't think you can do it with an effects box, as you'd have to then be modifying a guitar sound. The Variax outputs a banjo sound that is pretty realistic, but most guitar players complain about the playability compared to their other guitars. My old guitar player only used it for banjo and acoustic sounds (which it's great for as well) and used another "real" guitar for everything else.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I don't think you can do it with an effects box, as you'd have to then be modifying a guitar sound.

 

I just found this. The specs states it can emulate a banjo. I wonder how it sounds?

 

This touches on a larger issue.

 

I go to a lot of effort trying to tweaking patches to try and match the sound you hear on the original recording.

I got some feedback from our last gig that our guitarist has a "one dimensional sound". The sound that you use for RATT isn't appropriate for "She's got the Look".

 

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The Variax outputs a banjo sound that is pretty realistic, but most guitar players complain about the playability compared to their other guitars. My old guitar player only used it for banjo and acoustic sounds (which it's great for as well) and used another "real" guitar for everything else.

 

I have been considering picking up a Variax, for I already have a Line6 Live. The only guy I know who has one got the cheap model (and likes it for what it is.) I've been told that the "playability issue" is mostly because of the instrument being ergonomically NOT balanced. Apparently, the neck is heavy (?), so it is uncomfortable to wear for a period of time. Does anyone know if the more expensive model is balanced? Or, is the "playability issue" more pervasive?

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This touches on a larger issue.

 

I go to a lot of effort trying to tweaking patches to try and match the sound you hear on the original recording.

I got some feedback from our last gig that our guitarist has a "one dimensional sound". The sound that you use for RATT isn't appropriate for "She's got the Look".

 

Guitar players are lazy. No offense, but to this day I've played with two guitar players who really tweak their sounds. The rest of them have 5-6 basic sounds and all they really alter between songs is delay tempo. And usually they play approximately 70% correct riffs. Except AC/DC which they all nail. They're all great players, but if they were keyboard players they wouldn't get called more than once.

 

While I'm ranting; If a guitar player really nails a solo or a part or brings a mandolin or something people are sooo impressed. Keyboard players do so much more than that every single gig! End of rant. :deadhorse:

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People really cover Come on Eileen?
+1000000000000000000000000000000000

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I like this song. :)

 

It's kind of a novelty song with the tempo changes and all. It has an improvised counter-melody which begins in a slow tempo and gets faster and faster over an accelerando vocal backing. The chord sequence of the bridge is actually the same as the verses but transposed up by a whole tone.

 

Throughout the song, there are numerous tempo changes and key changes:

 

Key changes throughout the song include: Introduction F major, Verses C major, Chorus D major, and Bridge D major.

 

Of course, I liked The Carpenters way back when too.

 

I draw the line at The Captain & Tennille singing Muskrat Love though. :sick:

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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I like this song. :)

 

 

I do too. When it came out, nothing really sounded like it on US radio.

 

I draw the line at The Captain & Tennille singing Muskrat Love though.

I like that song too. :laugh: I think I like it better than the original by America, except for the synth-muskrat sound. Toni Tenille does the symphony pops circuit, and when I did her show they don't have synthmuskrat. :laugh:

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I liked Dexy's, too. I saw them @ the Beacon Theater during the week they played Saturday Night Live when "Come On Eileen" was a rising hit. "Searching for the Young Soul Rebels" was strong, too.

 

If the guitarist uses a Variax for the banjo and it can stand in for electric sitar, you could do another '80s one (US) hit wonder, Paul Young's cover of "Everytime You Go Away".

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We are letting the singer choose the next few songs so we can replace songs that she isn't suited for.

 

I like the song for what it is. It's not breaking any new ground musically. It's a fun pop song that people will know. I guarantee it will go over well and I enjoy playing anything that's a hit with the crowd.

 

Our drummer was on record as saying he hates the song, but at the end of practice, he admitted he had fun doing it.

 

Our general philosophy is when it's another band member's turn to pick a song, shut your mouth and play it to the best of your abilities. Once we get it down, and start playing it out, use the audience's reaction as a guide as to whether it should stick or not.

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If the guitarist uses a Variax for the banjo and it can stand in for electric sitar, you could do another '80s one (US) hit wonder, Paul Young's cover of "Everytime You Go Away".

 

And if it can cover a Mandolin, we could do The Hooters "And we danced".

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Our general philosophy is when it's another band member's turn to pick a song, shut your mouth and play it to the best of your abilities. Once we get it down, and start playing it out, use the audience's reaction as a guide as to whether it should stick or not.

 

Tell that to the Diva. :rolleyes:

 

http://thisrecording.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/mariah_carey.jpg

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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If the guitarist uses a Variax for the banjo and it can stand in for electric sitar, you could do another '80s one (US) hit wonder, Paul Young's cover of "Everytime You Go Away".

 

And if it can cover a Mandolin, we could do The Hooters "And we danced".

 

You can get the sound, but it's difficult to make it sound right because you can't voice the chords the same way since a guitar is tuned different than a mandolin. We tried this in my old band. We ended up buying a mandolin and tried teaching our singer to play the part since the rest of us were busy with other parts. He never did learn it, so our guitar player pulled it off best he could on the guitar. It never sounded right so we dumped it.

 

A word on Come On Eileen: I've played this in 3 bands now, and it generally goes over pretty well. However, I would not rate it as an "A" song on our list. We probably play it about 25% of the time. Doesn't go over as well as Love Shack, the Madonna stuff, Let's Go Crazy, etc. Seems to go over best with the slightly older crowd - great song for a high school reunion or 40th birthday party, etc. Not that it goes over bad - it still goes over pretty well, I'm just saying there are hotter songs.... it's not one of those that ALWAYS has to be in the list like some others.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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If we're ever in that situation we probably would ask our Singer to cover the mandolin as well. She claims she can handle simply guitar. I've never heard her play, but I assume she'd be able to handle the mandolin part in the hooters song if she put some work in.

 

I know what you're saying re: Eileen. It's not really a dance song, so that kinda limits it as far as being considered an 'A' song. I see it as a song to play in the 3rd set when everbody is drunk.

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We usually put those kinds of songs in our first set, because people are there, but not quite ready to go nuts on the dance floor. So you play songs they really like, but aren't necessarily going to dance to. By the end of the first set, when they're starting to warm up, then you start breaking out the dance stuff. Just enough to get them going and looking forward to set 2. Set 2 is our highest powered set - usually the first 3/4 heavy on the dance stuff, and end it out with several hair band songs. Set 3 is usually pretty strong, too - we tend to keep most people til the end of the night - which is good for the bars. If you keep 'em going, the bar sells more alcohol, and they'll want you back.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Back in the 80s, I once saw The Hooters open for Loverboy.

 

And no, I'm not proud of that.

 

Noah

 

Nor should you be. :P

 

Although my first big concert was Ozzie Osbourne, so how much crap can I really give other people about what they did in the 80s... ;)

 

--Dave

 

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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So this thread has turned into a confessional?

 

I saw the Hooters with the Outfield as a opening act.

 

My low point may have been a Jack Wagner concert. My sister was involved in his fan club, but was too young to travel to the concert by herself.

 

 

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Our general philosophy is when it's another band member's turn to pick a song, shut your mouth and play it to the best of your abilities. Once we get it down, and start playing it out, use the audience's reaction as a guide as to whether it should stick or not.

 

Tell that to the Diva. :rolleyes:

 

http://thisrecording.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/mariah_carey.jpg

Hey Tom, would you please just start a 'hot pic of the day' thread? I get tired of reading through all the musician drivel, looking for your pic posts.

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I've always dug that tune but had no idea bands covered it. I was just talking to my Wednesday band about covering "Tell Me A Bedtime Story", so I guess I'm just in a different neighborhood.

 

I'm totally confused about this post. My group does Tell Me A Bedtime Story and I don't recall needing any banjo? Herbie Hancock's Tell Me A Bedtime Story, right? Maybe i'm just not aware of another one.

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