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cold dry weather - hand protection tip


Dave Horne

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I get dry cracks in my fingers when it gets cold and dry outside. When you're working a job you really don't want to spend the time to use hand creme as it can take a while to get absorbed. I stumbled upon using ChapStick. It works like a charm.

 

Just passing this on. As you were.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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NIce tip, Dave!!! Will try it.

 

I have taken to using fingerless gloves for colder rehearsals.....

 

 

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Out here in Colorado, the dewpoints get very low in the winter. We use "Bag Balm": comes in a "4 x 4" green tin. It's like a super concentrated form of Vaseline. The product GovernorSilver mentioned sounds similar.

 

A drummer friend used to super glue the splits/cracks in his fingers; it worked... I use 'liquid bandage': my left index finger is much happier today as a result.

 

Also have several pairs/styles of gloves. Always have 'roadie' gloves with me.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yeah, I have this problem too. I know, I know, it doesn't get very cold here. But it's all what you are used to. And when the highs are in the 50s or low 60s and the lows are in the 30s or 40s, that's cold enough for me.

 

I always wear "roadie gloves" during the load-in, even if it's hot. And I have thin cotton gloves that I try to wear anytime in the hour or two before a gig anytime it's below like 65. They are thin enough that I can even play in them in a pinch, although it's suboptimal.

 

One of the problems of living somewhere that doesn't get that cold usually, is that heating systems often suck. I played a cavernous club last weekend, and it was unusually cold for here. Place was a f'ing meat locker when we got there. And even by the very end of the night the weak-ass heater there had probably only gotten it up to 65 inside. It was probably 60 during our set. Not horrible, but certainly not what one expects indoors!

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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Last time we were in Austin over the summer, I was surprised by how many places didn't have A/C.

 

Here in Houston, we have the opposite problem. Some places run the A/C like it's a meat locker. The last gig I did I didn't notice I was set up under the vent. I was freezing and the rest of the band was sweating. I've already agreed to switch places with the bass player next time.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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The current dewpoint in Boston is -8 °F (-22 °C). It takes a bit for my sinuses to adjust to that. My guitars are not happy and I'm glad I don't have any pianos to worry about. The weather doesn't dry out my hands that badly, but certain kinds of manual labor do. My sister gave me what's probably a rather costly tube of hand cream called Ahava a few years ago. That stuff works great.

 

Cold gig? I got one that's hard to top. Outside temperature about -15 °F (-26 °C), inside temperature at show time about 40 °F (4 °C). It slowly got warmer through first set, but then the pipes burst and flooded the dance floor. That sucked. Game over.

--wmp
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Obviously it doesn't get that cold in FL, but I did freeze my butt off once when we were playing a street party at a place called Church Street Station. In January (bowl game kinda deal.) Mr. Nighttime knows what I'm talking about.

 

We set up on a rooftop with no protection from the wind. Had a couple of giant space heaters though, which didn't really help. I was playing guitar at the time, and at one point, in desperation, I turned and faced one of the heaters full on. My guitar dropped about an octave in pitch. It was the closest I ever came to sounding like Eddie Van Halen.

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My guitar dropped about an octave in pitch. It was the closest I ever came to sounding like Eddie Van Halen.
ROTFLOL

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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Cold gig? I got one that's hard to top. Outside temperature about -15 °F (-26 °C), inside temperature at show time about 40 °F (4 °C). It slowly got warmer through first set, but then the pipes burst and flooded the dance floor. That sucked. Game over.

 

Nah mayne, had you all waited long enough, the place would have turned into an ice rink. Crank up the music. :laugh:

 

Since my hands get cold real fast, I'd have to play wearing a pair of Isotoner gloves. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Good tip, Dave!

 

It is incredibly dry on the prairies and with the seasonal flu bug making it imperative to wash your hands more often it only makes matters worse.

 

I've been using Lypsyl for years on those finger cracks, along with Super/Krazy Glue for emergencies.

 

Avon makes a very good intensive care hand creme, as does Gold Bond.

____________________________________
Rod

victoria bc

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I was dating a girl once and she said her hands were cold, so I told her to put them where it was warm.

 

 

Good thing she didn't have cold feet...

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Out here in Colorado, the dewpoints get very low in the winter. We use "Bag Balm"...A drummer friend used to super glue the splits/cracks in his fingers; it worked... I use 'liquid bandage': my left index finger is much happier today as a result.

 

+2

 

Good suggestions. A lot of operating room people who scrub their hands several times a day swear by various "udder" or "bag" balm products. Check with a large animal vet supplier.

 

The liquid bandage products are also nice if you get a split or crack on a finger. Smells like ether and very flammable until they dry out, but very useful.

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

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Thanks Jake,

 

I checked out the link to the O'Keeffe's site. Going to pick up some "Working Hands" at my local Lowe's tomorrow. Bag Balm is about 80% effective for my hands/dry skin in this climate. But "Working Hands" is oil free, and works differently to draw/retain moisture; that intrigues me. Also, Bag Balm is only marginally helpful for my wife's hands: on the job she does frequent outdoor site inspections, has to take gloves off to write, etc.. That's brutal in cold temps on the windy CO plains. So we'll see if this product helps her hands too.

'Someday, we'll look back on these days and laugh; likely a maniacal laugh from our padded cells, but a laugh nonetheless' - Mr. Boffo.

 

We need a barfing cat emoticon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Real men are comfortable enough in their masculinity not to thick-headedly ignore injuries (especially injuries to crucial body parts that they smack against a solid surface a few thousand times a day for a living) for the sake of knuckle-dragging machismo. ;)

 

Thanks to Dave Horne for the Chapstick tip. I tried it tonight and it worked like a charm. I'll definitely be keeping a tube in my gig bag through the winter.

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Real men don't use the transpose button or an arpeggiator, but when it becomes so painful to play because of those dry cracks, real men take real measures. :wave:

 

I've brought hand lotion to jobs and you're rubbing your hands together for what seems an eternity to get that lotion to absorb; ChapStick (or a ChapStick-like product) is a no brainer.

 

I've known trumpet players who had injections (Novocaine?) into their lips to be able to get through jobs. That seems more damaging than it's worth, but I guess you gotta do what ya gotta do.

 

I'm not sure how I stumbled onto this ChapStick idea though, it might have been my wife's suggestion.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Another decent hand balm that is available at most pharmacies is Aquaphor. I handle boxes and envelopes all day. Talk about something that sucks the moisture out of your hands! Anyway I asked my Dr. what to use and he reccommended it. Its like a heavy vasoline and takes a few minutes to dry, but works well. I thought it was expensive at $7 bucks or so, but this tub has lasted the better part of a year.
SR guy thats finally decided to put his collection of toys to personal use (extremely G.A.S.'y) LOL
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One of the problems of living somewhere that doesn't get that cold usually, is that heating systems often suck.

--Dave

 

One of the other problems is that people think it's OK to hire a band anytime of the year for outdoor events. Every year I do a 9AM outdoor gig at the Golden Gate Bandshell on the last Sunday of November. This year it was incredibly warm but usually it is cold, wet, windy etc.

There's nothing worse than playing with cold fingers!

 

JP

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One of the problems of living somewhere that doesn't get that cold usually, is that heating systems often suck.

--Dave

 

One of the other problems is that people think it's OK to hire a band anytime of the year for outdoor events. Every year I do a 9AM outdoor gig at the Golden Gate Bandshell on the last Sunday of November. This year it was incredibly warm but usually it is cold, wet, windy etc.

There's nothing worse than playing with cold fingers!

 

JP

 

Yeah, I just got home from playing an outdoor gig. 11-3. Wasn't too bad today. It was foggy, breezy and chilly during the load-in, so I thought it was going to be miserable. But right around downbeat time the fog lifted, the clouds cleared away, and it became a beautiful sunny day. Still not that warm, but warm enough to lose the jacket and gloves, and play in a thin long-sleeved shirt.

 

We play there about once a month. Last month was brutal -- bright, cold and windy. We were all bundled up like Eskimos, and never did really get to feeling warm.

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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