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OT: What feels like home?


J. Dan

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OK, the Cinncinati thread, particularly regarding the Pittsburgh skyline, etc., got me thinking about this. There are certain things that sort of make you feel like you're home. With regards to the skyline, when I'm in IL for a week (working) and come home, as soon as I see the skyline including the Arch, I feel like I'm close to home. The Arch is a very distinguishable trait of the St. Louis skyline, although I'll admit overall other cities have better skylines. But still, for me, that's "Home".

 

Within my "home" of St. Louis, I live between two other landmarks that also make me feel "Home"...

 

Forest Park : A large park in the heart of the city - in fact 500 Acres larger than Central park. Includes St. Louis Zoo, History Museum, Art Museum, Science Center, 27 holes of golf, not to mention playgrounds, lakes, soccer fields, walking and biking trails, etc. It's about a 3 block walk to the south of my house.

 

The Loop: A strip of mostly local restaurants, bars, shops, etc. Originally called "The Loop", because in the old days when there were street cars (Like San Francisco), this was the end of the line and they turned around in a "Loop" to go back downtown. Of course this is now considered the heart of the city (actually Midtown) since urban sprawl has reach 40 miles in each direction. But a neat place to live with lots to do - and only a 5 or so block walk north from home.

 

Washington University: University in my neighberhood. In fact "the loop" above is often called the U-City loop - short for University City, Wash-U being that university. They own something like 15% of the housing in my neighborhood, so I have a lot of students. It's an integral part of my "Home"

 

 

So how about you?

 

Not intended as a p!ssing match on who's home city is better or what-not. I've travelled a lot and find lots of neat things all over the place. Sometimes architecture, natural resources, arts, whatever. I'm interested not as a tourist, but as a resident, what feels like HOME to you.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Nice thread idea, Dan.

 

As soon as the billboards disappear, I know I'm back in Vermont. I love to travel and tour, but it always feels so good to come back.

 

The view of the Adirondacks over lake Champlain gives me the warm fuzzies every time.

 

Even the gas stations have good coffee: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters.

 

The best club in Burlington, Nectars, feels like my second living room.

 

Lots of beautiful hippie college girls on the street: HOME! :D

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Nice thread idea, Dan.

 

As soon as the billboards disappear, I know I'm back in Vermont. I love to travel and tour, but it always feels so good to come back.

 

The view of the Adirondacks over lake Champlain gives me the warm fuzzies every time.

 

Even the gas stations have good coffee: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters.

 

The best club in Burlington, Nectars, feels like my second living room.

 

Lots of beautiful hippie college girls on the street: HOME! :D

 

That's kind of what I'm getting at - the less tangible stuff. You mention the taste of the coffee, the lack of billboards... each person, I suspect, would have different sensory perceptions of their hometown, and I am very curious as to what those are - particularly within this group.

 

Edit: Thought I'd add... I spend a lot of my "work" time (day job) in Decatur, IL... Home of ADM and Tate & Lyle. Corn Wet Milling, produce most of the world's High Fructose Corn Syrup, Ethanol, Corn & Soybean Oil, Lysene, Xanthan Gum, Glycol, Glycerin.... well, you get the idea.... anything you can possibly imagine from a kernal of corn or a soybean. Anyway, most people think it smells like ass in that town. It makes my wife sick when I come home and unpack my clothes. To me, it actually kind of smells good. Like a Brewery (if you are lucky enough to live near one). The guy that covered it before me called it "the smell of money". But it's more than that: A lot of my customers are close friends and it's kind of my "Home away from home" as I have an office there and spend one or two nights a week there. To me, I'm fond of it, to others, it makes them sick.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Oddly enough, for me it is a place that is not yet home.

 

I've called Pittsburgh home for a very long time. I came here for school, and kept coming back, leaving and coming back, leaving and coming back.... until I realized what I was doing and moved here for 'good'.

 

But recent changes have made the old girl not so attractive as she once was. I can't wait to leave.

 

And where I feel at home is in a small town on the Florida Gulf Coast called Venice. It has been bypassed by the college kids and the snowbirds, it is a small town compared to Pittsburgh but large enough to have reasonable city services, and there is just something about the area that calls to me.

 

 

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Why I like calling Rochester my home:

 

The dramatic seasonal differences. A typical hard winter hightens the anticipation of and appreciation for spring.

 

It's easy to get around town. The average morning commute is under 20 minutes. Driving a 1/2 hour means you're half way to Buffalo or Syracuse.

 

My suburb, Pittsford. Classic small town feel. Established in the late 1700s with much of the original buildings lining Main St. with small retail and restaurants. The Erie Canal runs through it. Public schools consistently rank among the best in the country.

 

Rochester has great cultural wealth for a city of modest size, especially in music: Eastman School of Music, the Rochester Philharmonic, Garth Fagan Dance, our 9 year old jazz festival that has become world class. Even the famous (or infamous) House of Guitars. Minutes from my house, there was a once a major piano factory for many manufacturers including Mason & Hamlin (now it's a mall/office space). The George Eastman House includes a major photography/film museum and archives for the works of important still photographers (Adams, Steichen, Carter-Bresson, etc.) and motion picture directors (Cecil B. DeMille, Martin Scorcese, Spike Lee).

 

Rochester is a good food town. Wegman's supermarkets are beloved (if you can love a supermarket). There are many excellent "red sauce" Italian restaurants all over town. Even the "junk food" is great. The legendary "garbage plate" at Nick Tahou's. The outstanding Dinosaur BBQ (OK, the original is in Syracuse). Sal's Birdland...1/2 chicken deep fried in 1 piece and smothered with a sweet spicy sauce (eating there once a year is my limit). Abbott's Frozen Custard is summertime on a cone.

 

The nearby Finger Lakes region is home to the best vinicultural area in the Northeast US. It's like having a little touch of Napa 30 minutes drive away.

 

 

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Nice thread idea, Dan.

 

As soon as the billboards disappear, I know I'm back in Vermont. I love to travel and tour, but it always feels so good to come back.

 

The view of the Adirondacks over lake Champlain gives me the warm fuzzies every time.

 

Even the gas stations have good coffee: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters.

 

The best club in Burlington, Nectars, feels like my second living room.

 

Lots of beautiful hippie college girls on the street: HOME! :D

 

I lived in Burlington for 4 years, so I can relate to that. Hell, I wished I still lived there honestly. Someday I'll move back.

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Today I got to do a session on a 1960 C3 and 22H. That felt like home. But seriously folks, I haven't been home to New Jersey since 1998. I don't know how I'd feel about it. We've been vacationing in the Low Country of South Carolina for the past four years, and there's something whispering in my ear that it could be home someday. Of course, I say that about Vegas and New Orleans...

9 Moog things, 3 Roland things, 2 Hammond things and a computer with stuff on it

 

 

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I might as well mention some "home-y" things about my current home for the past few years, Louisville, KY. There aren't really any strong visual markers in the Louisville skyline, like St. Louis has with the arch, or Seattle with the Needle, for example. The Aegon Center does stand out from the rest, though. If you look at a pic of the Louisville skyline, it's the one with the domed top. The whole dome is illuminated at night, so it looks pretty cool. Other than that, though, the stuff that I identify with Louisville:

 

Bardstown Road: Basically the equivalent of the Loop in St. Louis or Church St. in Burlington. It's a strip where all the cool bars, shops, and eateries are located.

 

Spaghetti Junction: This is a bad one, but identifiable nonetheless. It's a point in downtown Louisville where 3 major interstate highways converge into a clusterfuck of poor planning. It's a disaster during rush hour.

 

Waterfront Park: The name is self explanatory, really. It's a nice park right on the river downtown. During the summer they have some killer free outdoor concerts there, and it's also sort of the home base for "Thunder Over Louisville," which is the biggest annual fireworks show in the US.

 

Of course, there are other associations that aren't places, per se, like Louisville Slugger bats, bourbon, and the Kentucky Derby.

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Although I live in a MD suburb, whenever I return from traveling and see the historic DC landmarks, I know that I'm home.

 

While I enjoy visiting other places, it always feels good to come back to the pulse of my city. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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In my case here in Melbourne FL, it's the Causeways. There are 5 beach access roads in the southern part of the county, and all of them feel like home to me. Just seeing them gives me that I'm where I belong feeling.

 

For my wife it's seeing alligators, dolphins, manatees, and sand hill cranes.

 

 

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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One of the things that draws us back to Florida is the view from a local jetty, from which people are fishing, couples are walking, and some are just hanging around. The dolphins play in the water and birds are everywhere. (The home we have our eyes on is in a bird sanctuary, an eagle lives in a tree at the home next door.)

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/Florida%20sunset/jetty3jan09.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/Florida%20sunset/jetty3jan09.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0513e1.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0290e1.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0487.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0320e1.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0293e1.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/PICT0529e1.jpg

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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I work in the detroit area, and live outside of detroit. Its like the scene in the wizard of OZ leaving detroit suddenly everything is in color again once you get into the further suburbs. The further the better and more colorful!

-Greg

Motif XS8, MOXF8, Hammond XK1c, Vent

Rhodes Mark II 88 suitcase, Yamaha P255

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And where I feel at home is in a small town on the Florida Gulf Coast called Venice. It has been bypassed by the college kids and the snowbirds, it is a small town compared to Pittsburgh but large enough to have reasonable city services, and there is just something about the area that calls to me.

 

 

There's a church in Venice that I play twice a year. They offered me an MD job and I really had to give it some serious consideration. Venice is a really nice town. Hope it works out for you.

 

For me, the home question is complicated. I love Orlando and I love Vero Beach (FL's east coast equivalent to Venice, in a way.) Right now it's O-Town. Gotta gig . . .

 

 

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Nice thread

Tome home is the chaos i experience in my everyday life - with its goods and bads. The weather = even rain is smooth around this part of the world. And the old city when i got the time to walk around it. But most of all home is where my childhood is: friends, roads that i walked as a adolescent even buildings and music i used to love back then. Home is Paris, where i lived two years in my twenties. And Athens, of couse...

Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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When you have lived as many places as I have over the years (10 major cities in 3 countries), you learn to call "home" wherever you are. These days, I split my time between two very sharp contrasts in living areas. Sausalito, CA and Metro Detroit, MI.

 

The one place that has felt more like "home" to me and is where I'm most centered is Sausalito, California.

 

Nothing says "I'm home" to me quite like crossing the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco into Marin County. The beauty of the SF Bay under the bridge and the hills of Marin make for a breathtaking sight. Each day, as I come home and cross the bridge, I sigh and take a deep breath (I feel my BP lower in the process) and think some in this world have never seen anything this beautiful and I get to see this every day.

 

Other things that say "home" to me is looking out at the Bay from my home and being on the water on my sailboat.

 

Breakfast at Mama's in North Beach, a fine little taqueria under an overpass in San Rafael, Red's Java Hut for lunch on the Embarcadero, summer in September and 7 minute drive from San Francisco.

 

What''s not to love?

 

 

The GG Bridge

 

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m278/raycooke/Stuff/golden-gate-bridge-picture.jpg

 

View from my living room.

 

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m278/raycooke/Stuff/SausalitoNorth.jpg

 

More view from home.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m278/raycooke/Stuff/RJC355F12001_0929AL_1.jpg

 

Sailing on the bay.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m278/raycooke/Stuff/DSCF0203.jpg

Yamaha C7 Grand, My Hammonds: '57 B3, '54 C2, '42 BC, '40 D, '05 XK3 Pro System, Kawai MP9000, Fender Rhodes Mk I 73, Yamaha CP33, Motif ES6, Nord Electro 2, Minimoog Voyager & Model D, Korg MS10
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Those are some beautiful pictures. Spent some time in San Fran, but not in the outlying districts. The odd thing about San Francisco is that it has a very similar climate to Pittsburgh. (Much more expensive, though...)

 

I'm an Army Brat, so I grew up all over the world, from Alaska to Europe and we all have that ability to adapt to wherever we are, no doubt. And I've always been a city kid. Love cites, the buzz, the architecture, the diversity...But as I've gotten older, I seem to be more place-sensitive...or at least, I've become less tolerant of the nonsense that I see on the street every day and hear on the news every day both socially and politically... and I think that a part of it is that those climates have changed radically around here, making me much less happy to be here.

 

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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and I think that a part of it is that those climates have changed radically around here, making me much less happy to be here.

 

I'm truly sorry you feel that way Bill :(. At least you're heading off to a place that makes you happy. I'm sure the weather will be a lot nicer too! If you do ever feel homesick, I'm sure there's a Steeler bar somewhere close to you :laugh:

 

To be honest, I'm not a true Pittsburgher as I grew up in a small town about 45 minutes from the city. I did just spend the last 4 years of my life living in Oakland when I went to CMU, and I now work in Lawrenceville. Though at this point I'm back living with my parents for a bit so I can shed all of my college loan debt (should have it all paid off within the next year!)

 

I know I'm home when I get to the part of the river valley where I live, hills covered with trees and houses. When I'm in other places that have a similar sort of topography I'm reminded of home.

 

But the thing that definitely lets me know I'm home? Mom's cooking! :D

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"But the thing that definitely lets me know I'm home? Mom's cooking!"

 

Thats a tough one to beat!

 

CMU brought me here, too.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Great thread!

 

I get that "almost home" feeling the opposite of meisenhower -- for me it's coming south across the GG bridge into the City. Although I'm not really home yet when I do that, I live 45 minutes farther south. It's weird, for me how close I need to be to feel "home" depends on where I've been. If I'm coming from anywhere east of the coast range, I don't really feel home until I come over the Sunol grade and see the south end of the Bay.

 

If I'm coming from LA, the Salinas valley feels like "home". It's still two hours away, but it's the first place that truly stops seeming like either middle-of-nowhere, or Southern California.

 

And yes, if I'm up in the North Coast anywhere, then crossing the Bridge into the City definitely feels like coming "home".

 

But all of that is just about the driving. What really tells me that I am home, truly home, in the Silicon Valley is . . . tacos.

 

And no, I'm not talking about the strange crispy meat things you get at Taco Bell. I'm talking about real tacos. Homemade corn tortillas with carnitas, chile, and a little cilantro. Mmmmm.

 

--Dave

 

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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What feels like home? That Eastern North Carolina accent - often imitated. Never duplicated.

 

...and, of course, vinegar-based BBQ and the smell of freshly-harvested tobacco in the early fall.

 

...not to mention the moonshine at Christmas parties. :cool:

 

Yeah.

 

:snax:

 

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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What feels like home? That Eastern North Carolina accent - often imitated. Never duplicated.

 

...and, of course, vinegar-based BBQ and the smell of freshly-harvested tobacco in the early fall.

 

...not to mention the moonshine at Christmas parties. :cool:

 

Yeah.

 

:snax:

 

 

:thu: On the BBQ and the accent. Especially the BBQ. The moonshine somewhat, The tobacco smell, not so much.

 

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What feels like home? That Eastern North Carolina accent - often imitated. Never duplicated.

 

...and, of course, vinegar-based BBQ and the smell of freshly-harvested tobacco in the early fall.

 

...not to mention the moonshine at Christmas parties. :cool:

 

Yeah.

 

:snax:

 

 

:thu: On the BBQ and the accent. Especially the BBQ. The moonshine somewhat, The tobacco smell, not so much.

 

Oh my, Mr. Gizmo. I forgot that you live in CHAPEL HILL. Let me rephrase that...

 

 

...and, of course, vinegar-based BBQ and the smell of freshly-harvested cannibis in the early fall. :laugh:

 

 

(Of course I'm kidding. Everyone knows there is no such thing in this little college town.)

 

Right Ken?

 

RIGHT KEN? :D

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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