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Rhodes Mark I question


Daddyg3042

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Hi,

I've got a line on one, circa 9/76, and seriously thinking about adding it to my collection. Haven't seen or touched it yet, but doing some research. Found this:

Rhodes Mark I

They say:

"Today's prices: Like new $750 Like, it's okay for its age $500 Like hell $300 "

 

To those who know...does this seem accurate?

 

Any input appreciated.

 

"May you stay...forever young."

 

 

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Those prices seem to be right. Personally, I wouldn't part with my Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase for $750, I think I paid about $1200.00 in 1979 for it, In would never sell it for less than that. Mine is in GREAT condition, "like new" is subjective, but there are only a couple of minor blemishes on the Tolex covering. The wonders of flight cases and then being stationery in my music room for years.

 

Its still a great instrument and fun to play. Of course its NO joy to move!

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I disagree on the high-end. I have a Mark II that is in "like new" condition. By "like new" I mean it has never been gigged. The tolex is perfect with the exception of a single small scuff, but absolutely no deep scratches, rips etc.. All of the Rhodes badges are prefect. It has all of the components including the plastic bag for the legs. Everything is in "like new" condition. It absolutely looks new. Now the downside, and it's a big one, is that it's a plastic action, so it's not worth much and I only paid ~$300 for it. But if it was a standard Mark I in that condition it could easily fetch $2000. A Rhodes, Wurly or Clav that haven't been gigged and have all of the components are worth $2,000, easy. But these are EXTREMELY rare.

 

Busch.

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Thanks everyone. This one is priced higher then the "like new" pricing too, but not by much-$800. That sounded reasonable to me for a cosmetically good and fully working Rhodes with all the parts.

 

After a couple days thinking about it though, while it'd be a really fun addition in so many ways, what I really need is a 76 key gigging board that's not a bear to schlep around, maintain, etc. Don't think the Rhodes fits that bill, and I wouldn't want to beat it up anyway.

 

Appreciate the feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

"May you stay...forever young."

 

 

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Location is also a significant factor in the price and not just what country you're in. I travel quite a bit and have found that prices in certain parts of the country reflect not only the local economy but the supply as well. I am astonished to sometimes find guys who act like finding a Rhodes is pure serendipity. They are still out there and plentiful if you know where to look.
Fender Rhodes (x4) / Wurlitzer 200A / NE3 61 / Motif XS6 / Korg SV-1 73
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There pretty much aren't any true "like new". They'd fetch a much higher price than $750.

 

$700 - $800 is typical for "good condition", and including all the parts except perhaps the angle braces for the back legs. This allows a few tolex tears, and a bit of obvious oxidation on the coils, a few scratches on the keys, and not particularly even registration between the keys (due to some warping of wood keys).

 

For GC, the neoprene hammer tips may be deeply dented. This can be repaired at small expense and a bit of work. Often only the lower third (the softest tips) need to be replaced.

 

For EC, most of the coils are nice and "pink", with little obvious oxidation on internal parts. Key registration is regular (even spacing between, even height) showing little key warping (or else good technician work to even it back out ... which is just as good). All parts included, except perhaps the rear leg angle braces. Hammer tips should not be deeply dented.

 

A pedal costs $150. If it's missing, deduct that. (You can get an "ugly" pedal for $60 or so, but they feel like crap under your foot. I'd spring the extra $90 to get a remanufactured one.)

 

IIRC, a set of legs (probably missing the rear leg angle braces) runs $150.

 

The rear leg angle braces, while frequently missing, are rather important. Without them, the flanges for the rear legs take more abuse than they're designed for.

 

I have all the parts for mine (1977), including angle braces and the plastic wrapper for the legs. But the hammers are deeply dented, and the coils and other interior parts show fairly obvious (but not terrible) oxidation, and a few tolex tears. I'd probably be able to get $800 for it.

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I used to own a Suitcase 73 from about 1970. It was fine for my limited keyboard playing skills, but as I occasionally tried other used Rhodes models in stores, I can tell you that the quality of action can vary quite a bit from one of these to the next. And the others here have mentioned some of the parts which could be worn. I would not want to buy one today without either playing and inspecting it myself, or getting some other assurance from a knowlegdeable and trusted source about the condition of that particular instrument.
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